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1,000 Days Without A Trial: Jan. 6 Prisoner Shares His Story of ‘Endurance, Perseverance, And Hope’

1,000 Days Without A Trial: Jan. 6 Prisoner Shares His Story of ‘Endurance, Perseverance, And Hope’

Authored by Patricia Tolson via The Epoch…

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1,000 Days Without A Trial: Jan. 6 Prisoner Shares His Story of 'Endurance, Perseverance, And Hope'

Authored by Patricia Tolson via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours),

Jake Lang rescued Philip Anderson from a stampede at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. (Courtesy of Jake Lang)

On Oct. 12, Jake Lang passed a milestone: 1,000 days in jail without a trial. To mark the anniversary, he wanted to share with the American people "the horrific conditions of confinement," which he says he and many of his fellow Jan. 6 prisoners have had to endure.

"During this time, I've done 20 months of solitary confinement," Mr. Lang told The Epoch Times. "For 15 months of that, I wasn't allowed to have a haircut or a shave."

This was intentional, he said, to make Jan. 6 prisoners look like "homeless vagrants" or "deranged terrorists" during video court appearances.

Jan. 6 prisoners are frequently denied family visitation, Mr. Lang said. They spend months with no sunlight. Lights in their cells remain on at night, depriving them of sleep.

His account aligns with first-hand reports from other Jan. 6 prisoners, detailed in a Congressional report in 2021.

Troublesome prisoners are subjected to "diesel therapy," where inmates are shackled together—frequently with violent gang members—for long bus or plane rides to another facility. The trips can take hours, days, or weeks. Fights are frequent. Personal belongings and discovery for their trials—family photos, exculpatory documents, and notes related to their cases—are often lost.

Family members lose track of them.

The 28-year-old Mr. Lang (full name: Edward Jacob Lang) has been charged with several counts, including an "obstruction" charge, for which he could receive a 20-year sentence. As reported by The Epoch Times, Mr. Lang has challenged this charge with the Supreme Court.

Following his arrest on Jan. 16, 2021, Mr. Lang has been shuttled from one prison to another. In New York, he was moved to three different facilities, including the MDC Brooklyn where Jeffrey Epstein was held.

Then he was taken to an airport in Newburgh, New York, put on a plane with about 200 convicted felons, and transported to Oklahoma, he said.

He was moved to Northern Neck Regional in Warsaw, Virginia, and then to the DC Jail, known to Jan. 6 prisoners as "The Gulag."

Confined to his cell for 23 hours and 15 minutes each day for three months, he was frequently physically assaulted. The first time was on Sept. 18, 2021, before a rally in the DC mall in support of Jan. 6 prisoners.

About 6 a.m., he said "around 70 officers began banging on the cell doors" of Jan. 6 inmates, ordering them to get dressed and grab their mats. They were being moved to "a more secure location," they were told.

Guards were shouting. Inmates were confused and scared.

"Some thought we were being taken outside to a firing squad," he said. "They thought they were going to kill us."

To ease their fear, he began singing the national anthem.

A guard threw him against the wall and punched him in the ribs.

They were all taken to the basement and placed in cells with no windows, no sinks, or toilets.

The ordeal lasted eight hours.

Mr. Lang was then "tossed in the hole."

"It's disgusting down there," he said. "The walls are wet. There's vermin and cockroaches, and there's a little slot in the door that they feed you through like a dog."

About 10 months later, Mr. Lang was brought back up to the pod—an independent section within the facility that holds a small number of prisoners. His fellow Jan. 6 prisoners gathered at his cell door to greet him.

"One of the guards yelled for them to get away from my door, just arbitrarily enforcing a rule that didn't exist," he explained. "He called the sergeant, who opened the door and unloaded a whole can of military-grade pepper spray directly into my eyes."

Naked and in cuffs, an emergency response team dragged him from the cell and brought him to a shower. Female guards watched, "laughing hysterically" at his pain.

He wasn't given soap, so the oil ran down his body to his groin where the burning became excruciating. In his cell, the burning oil transferred to his mattress. He woke from nightmares thinking he was on fire.

When he was thrown back in "the hole," he went on a 12-day hunger strike that cost him 30 pounds.

Negotiations for ending his hunger strike included a haircut, family visitation, and a Congressional investigation into the deaths of Ashli Babbitt and Rosanne Boyland.

He was then moved to Alexandria Regional Jail and placed in solitary.

After reporting his treatment to the press, he was sent to a federal penitentiary in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.

After more press interviews, he was moved to Rappahannock Regional Jail in Stafford, Virginia.

One month and multiple interviews later, he was back at Northern Neck. A week later he was once again at Lewisburg, and then landed back at the DC jail, where he has been for the past six months.

"Friday, October 13th marked my 1,000th day in prison. But God's grace has supplied me and the rest of the January 6 prisoners with strength, endurance, perseverance, and hope, knowing that we will have vindication from this political persecution. One day, from all over the country, more than 200 of us will emerge from these prisons and gulags. We will be redeemed and restored and all of the things they've done to us will all be washed away."

Mr. Lang's trial had been set to begin Oct. 10, but was postponed pending an indication on his Supreme Court petition.

Tyler Durden Thu, 10/19/2023 - 22:00

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Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

During the company’s last earnings call in November, recently appointed CEO Stewart Glendinning…

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Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

During the company’s last earnings call in November, recently appointed CEO Stewart Glendinning acknowledged the company made some missteps: Among other factors, there was a misalignment between its assortment and customer demand, Retail Dive's Nate Delesline reports.

An Express storefront at King of Prussia mall in Pennsylvania. The retailer said this week that it plans to initiate an international brand expansion starting next year

Express took a hit during the pandemic as its core offering — business casual — fell out of favor as work-from-home surged.

“Unfortunately, my previous assessment of Express’ fragile financial situation leading to a possible bankruptcy due to declining revenue, gross margin profits and ballooning debt of $280 million is a foregone conclusion,” Shawn Grain Carter, a retail industry consultant and professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology at the State University, said in an email to Retail Dive. “With high-interest rates, the retail company must decide between the ‘lesser of two evils.’ Moreover, until they fix the waning consumer demand for their merchandise and elevate the brand and product mix, financial wizardry will not resolve their retail woes.”

Over the past several years, the company has undergone a number of changes as it works to improve its performance. Last January, WHP Global closed on a strategic partnership with Express. The two entities formed an intellectual property joint venture under which WHP contributed $235 million for a 60% stake, while Express retained the remaining 40%. The two entities in November announced plans to expand Express internationally, including in Indonesia and Paraguay, and grow its presence in Central America and Mexico. 

And after the New York Stock Exchange warned of a potential delisting in late March, Express executed a 1-for-20 reverse stock split, which decreased outstanding shares to 3.7 million from 74.9 million. That stock split enabled Express to regain listing compliance with the New York Stock Exchange. Around the same time, Express said it planned to cut 150 jobs by the end of the third quarter.

The company also expanded its portfolio last year through a deal with WHP to acquire Bonobos from Walmart for $75 million. That acquisition helped guide the retailer to a 5% year-over-year uptick in Q3 net sales to $454.1 million from $434.1 million a year earlier. However, comparable sales for Express stores and e-commerce fell 4% and net loss grew to $36.8 million from $34.4 million in the year-ago period. Inventory was also up 14% for the quarter, rising to nearly $481 million from $422.7 million a year earlier. 

“Express has the right building blocks in place with a strong portfolio of brands, a high-potential partnership with WHP and a premier omnichannel platform,” Glendinning said in the earnings announcement. “Our efforts to unlock our full potential and improve our performance are already underway.”

The apparel retailer in late November lowered its full-year 2023 guidance, now expecting net sales to be between $1.84 billion and $1.87 billion, with Bonobos driving $150 million in net sales. 

Finally, on Friday, Bloomberg reported that at least one lender to Express has approached the retailer to put aside a pool of money for expenses tied to a potential future bankruptcy filing.

A demand to set aside so-called cash reserves, if enforced, could push Express into Chapter 11 as it would eat into limited liquidity available for necessary payments to vendors, landlords and other parties.

Creditors have been growing increasingly antsy and considering whether to push the company to file for bankruptcy, Bloomberg previously reported.

Express, which is burning through a short supply of cash as it attempts to fix troubled operations, is looking to avoid any move to fund reserves for as long as possible, other people familiar with the matter said. The retailer lost over $150 million in three quarters through late October as it faced an escalating competitive threat from fast-fashion rivals.

Tyler Durden Fri, 02/23/2024 - 18:00

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Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

During the company’s last earnings call in November, recently appointed CEO Stewart Glendinning…

Published

on

Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

During the company’s last earnings call in November, recently appointed CEO Stewart Glendinning acknowledged the company made some missteps: Among other factors, there was a misalignment between its assortment and customer demand, Retail Dive's Nate Delesline reports.

An Express storefront at King of Prussia mall in Pennsylvania. The retailer said this week that it plans to initiate an international brand expansion starting next year

Express took a hit during the pandemic as its core offering — business casual — fell out of favor as work-from-home surged.

“Unfortunately, my previous assessment of Express’ fragile financial situation leading to a possible bankruptcy due to declining revenue, gross margin profits and ballooning debt of $280 million is a foregone conclusion,” Shawn Grain Carter, a retail industry consultant and professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology at the State University, said in an email to Retail Dive. “With high-interest rates, the retail company must decide between the ‘lesser of two evils.’ Moreover, until they fix the waning consumer demand for their merchandise and elevate the brand and product mix, financial wizardry will not resolve their retail woes.”

Over the past several years, the company has undergone a number of changes as it works to improve its performance. Last January, WHP Global closed on a strategic partnership with Express. The two entities formed an intellectual property joint venture under which WHP contributed $235 million for a 60% stake, while Express retained the remaining 40%. The two entities in November announced plans to expand Express internationally, including in Indonesia and Paraguay, and grow its presence in Central America and Mexico. 

And after the New York Stock Exchange warned of a potential delisting in late March, Express executed a 1-for-20 reverse stock split, which decreased outstanding shares to 3.7 million from 74.9 million. That stock split enabled Express to regain listing compliance with the New York Stock Exchange. Around the same time, Express said it planned to cut 150 jobs by the end of the third quarter.

The company also expanded its portfolio last year through a deal with WHP to acquire Bonobos from Walmart for $75 million. That acquisition helped guide the retailer to a 5% year-over-year uptick in Q3 net sales to $454.1 million from $434.1 million a year earlier. However, comparable sales for Express stores and e-commerce fell 4% and net loss grew to $36.8 million from $34.4 million in the year-ago period. Inventory was also up 14% for the quarter, rising to nearly $481 million from $422.7 million a year earlier. 

“Express has the right building blocks in place with a strong portfolio of brands, a high-potential partnership with WHP and a premier omnichannel platform,” Glendinning said in the earnings announcement. “Our efforts to unlock our full potential and improve our performance are already underway.”

The apparel retailer in late November lowered its full-year 2023 guidance, now expecting net sales to be between $1.84 billion and $1.87 billion, with Bonobos driving $150 million in net sales. 

Finally, on Friday, Bloomberg reported that at least one lender to Express has approached the retailer to put aside a pool of money for expenses tied to a potential future bankruptcy filing.

A demand to set aside so-called cash reserves, if enforced, could push Express into Chapter 11 as it would eat into limited liquidity available for necessary payments to vendors, landlords and other parties.

Creditors have been growing increasingly antsy and considering whether to push the company to file for bankruptcy, Bloomberg previously reported.

Express, which is burning through a short supply of cash as it attempts to fix troubled operations, is looking to avoid any move to fund reserves for as long as possible, other people familiar with the matter said. The retailer lost over $150 million in three quarters through late October as it faced an escalating competitive threat from fast-fashion rivals.

Tyler Durden Fri, 02/23/2024 - 18:00

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Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

During the company’s last earnings call in November, recently appointed CEO Stewart Glendinning…

Published

on

Apparel Retailer Express Moving Toward Bankruptcy

During the company’s last earnings call in November, recently appointed CEO Stewart Glendinning acknowledged the company made some missteps: Among other factors, there was a misalignment between its assortment and customer demand, Retail Dive's Nate Delesline reports.

An Express storefront at King of Prussia mall in Pennsylvania. The retailer said this week that it plans to initiate an international brand expansion starting next year

Express took a hit during the pandemic as its core offering — business casual — fell out of favor as work-from-home surged.

“Unfortunately, my previous assessment of Express’ fragile financial situation leading to a possible bankruptcy due to declining revenue, gross margin profits and ballooning debt of $280 million is a foregone conclusion,” Shawn Grain Carter, a retail industry consultant and professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology at the State University, said in an email to Retail Dive. “With high-interest rates, the retail company must decide between the ‘lesser of two evils.’ Moreover, until they fix the waning consumer demand for their merchandise and elevate the brand and product mix, financial wizardry will not resolve their retail woes.”

Over the past several years, the company has undergone a number of changes as it works to improve its performance. Last January, WHP Global closed on a strategic partnership with Express. The two entities formed an intellectual property joint venture under which WHP contributed $235 million for a 60% stake, while Express retained the remaining 40%. The two entities in November announced plans to expand Express internationally, including in Indonesia and Paraguay, and grow its presence in Central America and Mexico. 

And after the New York Stock Exchange warned of a potential delisting in late March, Express executed a 1-for-20 reverse stock split, which decreased outstanding shares to 3.7 million from 74.9 million. That stock split enabled Express to regain listing compliance with the New York Stock Exchange. Around the same time, Express said it planned to cut 150 jobs by the end of the third quarter.

The company also expanded its portfolio last year through a deal with WHP to acquire Bonobos from Walmart for $75 million. That acquisition helped guide the retailer to a 5% year-over-year uptick in Q3 net sales to $454.1 million from $434.1 million a year earlier. However, comparable sales for Express stores and e-commerce fell 4% and net loss grew to $36.8 million from $34.4 million in the year-ago period. Inventory was also up 14% for the quarter, rising to nearly $481 million from $422.7 million a year earlier. 

“Express has the right building blocks in place with a strong portfolio of brands, a high-potential partnership with WHP and a premier omnichannel platform,” Glendinning said in the earnings announcement. “Our efforts to unlock our full potential and improve our performance are already underway.”

The apparel retailer in late November lowered its full-year 2023 guidance, now expecting net sales to be between $1.84 billion and $1.87 billion, with Bonobos driving $150 million in net sales. 

Finally, on Friday, Bloomberg reported that at least one lender to Express has approached the retailer to put aside a pool of money for expenses tied to a potential future bankruptcy filing.

A demand to set aside so-called cash reserves, if enforced, could push Express into Chapter 11 as it would eat into limited liquidity available for necessary payments to vendors, landlords and other parties.

Creditors have been growing increasingly antsy and considering whether to push the company to file for bankruptcy, Bloomberg previously reported.

Express, which is burning through a short supply of cash as it attempts to fix troubled operations, is looking to avoid any move to fund reserves for as long as possible, other people familiar with the matter said. The retailer lost over $150 million in three quarters through late October as it faced an escalating competitive threat from fast-fashion rivals.

Tyler Durden Fri, 02/23/2024 - 18:00

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