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Loblaw donates over 1.5M pounds of surplus food through Second Harvest Food Rescue App

  TORONTO – Second Harvest, Canada’s largest food rescue organization, announced today that Loblaw Companies Limited has reached a major milestone: using the Second Harvest Food Rescue App, the company has donated 1,545,995 pounds of food through…

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TORONTO – Second Harvest, Canada’s largest food rescue organization, announced today that Loblaw Companies Limited has reached a major milestone: using the Second Harvest Food Rescue App, the company has donated 1,545,995 pounds of food through its stores in communities across Canada to date, including over 700,000 pounds in the last eight months alone, preventing the release of 7,152,422 pounds of CO2e emissions, while providing food for millions of meals for families and individuals in need. A Second Harvest supporter for 36 years, Loblaw has also committed $1 million to on-board the app in its banner stores and distribution centres nation-wide by 2024.

The Second Harvest Food Rescue App allows food businesses of any kind to donate their surplus directly to non-profits in their communities, like shelters, food banks and meal programs. Second Harvest launched the app across Ontario in October 2018 and expanded to lower mainland British Columbia in June 2019 with the support of Loblaw. When the pandemic hit in March 2020 the resulting urgent need for food led Second Harvest to make the app accessible to food businesses and non-profits in every province and territory.

“Loblaw’s leadership in adopting our food rescue app from its launch has been a crucial element to its success and we are proud to join with them in celebrating this incredible milestone,” said Lori Nikkel, CEO of Second Harvest. “Loblaw has been a key supporter of Second Harvest since 1985 and has been with us every step of the way as we work towards a zero-waste future where food can fulfill its purpose as a source of health and builder of human potential.”

To date, 848 grocery stores and Shoppers Drug Mart locations have registered on the food rescue app. The company will continue to expand across the country, on-boarding stores in Atlantic Canada and Quebec to the app through the fall of 2021 with continued expansion across the country in 2022.

“As Canada’s largest food retailer, growing our longstanding partnership with the nation’s largest food rescue organization is critical to our shared goal of reducing food waste, its associated environmental impact, and providing those in need with healthy food options,” said Tonya Lagrasta, Senior Director of Corporate Social Responsibility, Loblaw Companies Limited. “The immediate results we’re seeing with the expansion of the app to donate surplus food across our national store network are very encouraging and we look forward to the continued impact we’ll be able to achieve alongside Second Harvest.”

When surplus food ends up in landfill, it generates 56.5 million metric tonnes of CO2e emissions every year. While this good, healthy food is lost, 1 in 7 Canadian families struggles to put food on the table – a number exacerbated by the pandemic.

Second Harvest is the largest food rescue organization in Canada and a global thought leader in food recovery. Working across the supply chain – from farm to retail – we capture surplus perishable food before it ends up in landfill negatively impacting our environment. The Second Harvest Food Rescue App connects businesses with surplus food to local non-profits, ensuring good food gets to people. With the global pandemic, Second Harvest is leading the Food Rescue Canadian Alliance (FRCA), bringing together government, industry, Indigenous communities and the non-profit sector to ensure food reaches the most vulnerable members of our communities, from coast to coast to coast.

Loblaw Companies Limited is the nation’s largest retailer, providing Canadians with grocery, pharmacy, health and beauty, apparel, general merchandise, financial services, and wireless mobile products and services. Loblaw’s purpose – Live Life Well® – promotes the needs and wellbeing of Canadians, who make one billion transactions annually in the company’s stores. With more than 2,400 corporate, franchised and associate-owned locations, Loblaw, its franchisees, and associate-owners employ almost 200,000 full- and part-time employees, making it one of Canada’s largest private sector employers.

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Economics

FT-IGM US Macroeconomists Survey for December

The FT-IGM US Macroeconomists survey is out (it was conducted over the weekend). The results are summarized here, and an FT article here (gated). Here’s some of the results. For GDP, assuming Q4 is as predicted in the November Survey of Professional…

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The FT-IGM US Macroeconomists survey is out (it was conducted over the weekend). The results are summarized here, and an FT article here (gated). Here’s some of the results.

For GDP, assuming Q4 is as predicted in the November Survey of Professional Forecasters, we have the following picture.

Figure 1: GDP (black), potential GDP (gray), November Survey of Professional Forecasters (red), November SPF subtracting 1.5ppts in Q1, 05ppts in Q2 (blue), FT-IGM December survey (sky blue squares), all on log scale. FT-IGM GDP level assumes 2021Q4 growth rate equals SPF November forecast. NBER defined recession dates peak-to-trough shaded gray. Source: BEA 2021Q3 2nd release, Philadelphia Fed November SPF, FT-IGM December survey, and author’s calculations.

In the figure above, I’ve used the SPF forecast of 4.6% SAAR in 2021Q4; the Atlanta Fed’s nowcast as of yesterday (12/7) was 8.6% SAAR. A new nowcast comes out tomorrow.

Interestingly, q4/q4 median forecasted growth equals that implied by the Survey of Professional Forecasters November survey (which was taken nearly a month before news of the omicron variant came out).

The q4/q4 forecast distribution for 2022 is skewed, with the 90th percentile at 5% growth, the 10th percentile at 2.5%, and median at 3.5%. I show the corresponding implied levels of GDP (once again assuming 2021Q4 growth equals the SPF ).

Figure 2: GDP (black), November Survey of Professional Forecasters (red), FT-IGM December survey (sky blue squares), 90th percentile and 10th percentile implied levels (light blue +), my median forecast (green triangle), all on log scale. FT-IGM GDP level assumes 2021Q4 growth rate equals SPF November forecast. NBER defined recession dates peak-to-trough shaded gray. Source: BEA 2021Q3 2nd release, Philadelphia Fed November SPF, FT-IGM December survey, and author’s calculations.

On unemployment, the median forecast is for a deceleration in recovery,

Figure 3: Unemployment rate (black), November Survey of Professional Forecasters (red), FT-IGM December survey (sky blue square), 90th percentile and 10th percentile implied levels (light blue +), my median forecast (green triangle). NBER defined recession dates peak-to-trough shaded gray. Source: BEA 2021Q3 2nd release, Philadelphia Fed November SPF, FT-IGM December survey, and author’s calculations.

The survey respondents also think that the participation rate will take a long time to return to pre-pandemic levels.

Source: FT-IGM, December 2021 survey.

On inflation, the median is higher than the November SPF mean estimate for 2022 of 2.3% (and Goldman Sachs’ current estimate).

Source: FT-IGM, December 2021 survey.

The entire survey results are here.

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Over 170 companies delisted from major U.S. stock exchanges in 12 months

  Over the years, United States-based exchanges have remained an attractive destination for most companies aiming to go public. With businesses jostling to join the trading platforms, the exchanges have also delisted a significant number of companies….

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Over the years, United States-based exchanges have remained an attractive destination for most companies aiming to go public. With businesses jostling to join the trading platforms, the exchanges have also delisted a significant number of companies.

According to data acquired by Finbold, a total of 179 companies have been delisted from the major United States exchanges between 2020 and 2021. In 2021, the number of companies on Nasdaq and the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) stands at 6,000, dropping 2.89% from last year’s figure of 6,179. In 2019, the listed companies stood at 5,454.

NYSE recorded the highest delisting with companies on the platform, dropping 15.28% year-over-year from 2,873 to 2,434. Elsewhere, Nasdaq listed companies grew 7.86% from 3,306 to 3,566. Data on the number of listed companies on NASDAQ and NYSE is provided by The World Federation of Exchanges.

The delisting of the companies is potentially guided by basic factors such as violating listing regulations and failing to meet minimum financial standards like the inability to maintain a minimum share price, financial ratios, and sales levels. Additionally, some companies might opt for voluntary delisting motivated by the desire to trade on other exchanges.

Furthermore, the delisting on U.S. major exchanges might be due to the emergence of new alternative markets, especially in Asia. China and Hong Kong markets have become more appealing, with regulators making local listings more attractive. Over the years, exchanges in the region have strived to emerge as key players amid dominance by U.S. equity markets. As per a previous report, the U.S. controls 56% of the global stock market value.

A significant portion of the delisted companies also stems from the regulatory perspective pitting U.S. agencies and their Chinese counterparts. For instance, China Mobile Ltd, China Unicom, and China Telecom Corp announced their delisting from NYSE, citing investment restrictions dating from 2020.

Worth noting is that the delisting of firms was initiated due to strict measures put in place by the Trump administration. The current administration has left the regulations in place while proposing additional regulations. For instance, a recent regulation update by the Securities Exchange Commission requiring US-listed Chinese companies to disclose their ownership structure has led to the exit of cab-hailing company Didi from the NYSE.

Impact of pandemic on the listing of companies

The delisting also comes in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic that resulted in economic turmoil. With the shutdown of the economy, most companies entered into bankruptcies as the stock market crashed to historical lows.

Lower stock prices translate to less wealth for businesses, pension funds, and individual investors, and listed companies could not get the much-needed funding for their normal operations.

At the same time, the focus on more companies going public over the last year can be highlighted by firms on the Nasdaq exchange. Worth noting is that in 2020, there was tremendous growth in special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs), mainly driven by the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. With the uncertainty of raising money through the traditional means, SPACs found a perfect role to inject more funds into capital-starving companies to go public.

From the data, foreign companies listing in the United States have grown steadily, with the business aiming to leverage the benefits of operating in the country. Notably, listing on U.S. exchanges guarantees companies liquidity and high potential to raise capital. Furthermore, listing on either NYSE or Nasdaq comes with the needed credibility to attract more investors. The companies are generally viewed as a home for established, respected, and successful global companies.

In general, over the past year, factors like the pandemic have altered the face of stock exchanges to some point threatening the continued dominance of major U.S. exchanges. Tensions between the US and China are contributing to the crisis which will eventually impact the number of listed companies.

 

Courtesy of Finbold.

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Economics

Stock futures open flat as Omicron concerns ease

Dow futures edged up 0.02%, while contracts on the Nasdaq Composite inched up 0.10%…
The post Stock futures open flat as Omicron concerns ease first appeared on Trading and Investment News.

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Dow futures edged up 0.02%, while contracts on the Nasdaq Composite inched up 0.10%

Stock futures opened relatively flat on Wednesday evening, though sustaining gains posted by a three-day recovery rally that was led by cooled investor concerns around the Omicron variant of the coronavirus.

Dow futures edged up 0.02%, while contracts on the tech-focused Nasdaq Composite inched up 0.10%. All major indexes closed up, with the S&P 500 adding 14.46 points to end the session at 4,701.21, just 0.5% short of the trading session on Nov. 24, a day before the latest COVID-19 variant was announced by the World Health Organization (WHO).

The moves were supported by eased virus fears after Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech reported that early lab studies show a third dose of their coronavirus vaccine mitigates the Omicron variant.

The vaccine makers had indicated the initial two doses may not be enough to protect against infection from Omicron. Shares of Pfizer (PFE) traded 0.62% lower on Wednesday, closing at $51.40.

With virus concerns diminishing, investors are pivoting their attention back to economic data, awaiting Consumer Price Index (CPI) figures on Friday to assess the extent inflationary pressures will persist.

If the Omicron variant was to lead to a resurgence in goods spending at the expense of services or to further complicate supply disruptions, there could be a clear inflationary impact, too, HSBC economist James Pomeroy wrote earlier this week in a research note to clients.

He stated: The inflation news in the past few weeks has been decidedly mixed — with upside surprises in both the U.S. and eurozone being offset by the possibility of some of the supply chain issues starting to alleviate, while energy prices have fallen sharply in recent days.

The post Stock futures open flat as Omicron concerns ease first appeared on Trading and Investment News.

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