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How Significant Are Recent Changes To Psychedelics Access In Canada? ‘It Can’t Be Understated’ Says Numinus CEO

Numinus Wellness (TSX: NUMI) has stood out in the sector for its diligent support of amendments to Health Canada’s longstanding Special Access Program. After changes to the program were made last week, The Dales Report sat down with CEO Payton Nyquvest…

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Numinus Wellness (TSX: NUMI) has stood out in the sector for its diligent support of amendments to Health Canada’s longstanding Special Access Program. After changes to the program were made last week, The Dales Report sat down with CEO Payton Nyquvest to discuss their significance.

The Special Access Program, or SAP, is a longstanding program run by Canada’s federal health agency that provides patients in need with emergency access to drugs or therapies that have represented significant benefit but may not be accessible to patients for a variety of reasons. This includes drugs that have yet to go through the full clinical trial process, as well as drugs that may not be available in Canada.

“Any data that shows a positive result through a phase two or phase three study (which, with psychedelics, there are quite a few) gives unlimited amounts of Canadians access to those drugs or therapies,” said Nyquvest. “So, it’s a huge advancement… I don’t think it can be understated.”

The CEO said one thing he was pleasantly surprised to see within the document that detailed the amendments was how many times psychedelics were mentioned by Health Canada. He also said that most of the feedback provided to the agency regarding its proposed amendments was positive. 

“People are paying to the research…There’s a massive need at the moment. The stigma around psychedelics has come down quite a lot. People are reading the data and recognizing that this could be a potentially massive tool to address this issue we have around mental health.”

Could Health Canada be moving more quickly on the issue of psychedelics now that mental health has been collectively exacerbated by the seemingly never-ending Covid-19 pandemic? Nyquvest said based on what the healthcare system is facing, there is absolutely a greater need for solutions.

“From a micro standpoint, our therapists are busier than they’ve ever been. People are in a bad spot. We see it on the front line. We continue to see a huge amount of inbound interest around psychedelic therapy as well – our inbox is very busy,” he said.

“On a more macro standpoint, most recently, we see the overdose numbers coming out of British Columbia and out of Canada. Overdose numbers are higher than they’ve ever been, suicide rates are high, depression is skyrocketing. We’re in a bad spot; there’s no question about it.”

The SAP was created to help people “in dire need.” Moving forward, Nyquvest said that criteria for patients with mental health considerations should be clarified so that patients aren’t made to try ineffective frontline treatments before they are considered for special access.

“What are the criteria for someone to be in a state where they are in dire need? For psychedelic therapy, we think that needs to be prioritized. We shouldn’t have to guinea-pig someone through three different SSRI treatments if they are in a dire state,” he said. 

While Canadians could previously apply for medical use exemptions for psychedelics through Section 56 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the SAP is accessed by a physician on behalf of their patient and has a turnaround time of 48 hours—a big difference from the long and tedious CDSA exemption process.

Obviously, these changes are huge for patients seeking access, but what do they mean for businesses like Numinus? “The big question is always, how are companies going to generate revenue? With the SAP, it’s a revenue-generating activity, so we’re starting to see these therapies in market,” he said. 

“What’s exciting for us is we’ve been ready for over a year to facilitate requests for the SAP. What that also gives us the ability to do is put together better functioning models to hold psychedelic therapy.”

Nyquvest said that for companies that are ready, the SAP presents a significant opportunity. 

“It’s not just, ‘we’re going to pop up a location and start giving people MDMA or psilocybin,’” he said. “For us as a company, with the licensing we have to be able to import and export and potentially bring products into market, and then the physical locations to carry out therapy, we answer a lot of questions and help Health Canada a lot with putting together these models. It’s a big opportunity for us, and most importantly, an opportunity to start helping people.”

Watch the rest of the interview to learn more about how Numinus has prepared itself for the new and improved SAP, and how it stands to benefit.

The post How Significant Are Recent Changes To Psychedelics Access In Canada? ‘It Can’t Be Understated’ Says Numinus CEO appeared first on The Dales Report.

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Zinc Outlook 2022: Analysts Expect Small Refined Deficit

Click here to read the previous zinc outlook. After an uncertain 2020, zinc rose steadily in 2021, hitting a 14 year high in the second half of the year.The power crisis and increasing demand for the base metal as strict COVID-19-related lockdown restrict

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Click here to read the previous zinc outlook.

After an uncertain 2020, zinc rose steadily in 2021, hitting a 14 year high in the second half of the year.

The power crisis and increasing demand for the base metal as strict COVID-19-related lockdown restrictions were lifted supported prices for zinc during the 12 month period.

As the new year begins, the Investing News Network (INN) caught up with analysts to find out what’s ahead for zinc supply, demand and prices. Read on to learn what they had to say.


Zinc outlook 2022: 2021 in review


Zinc prices kicked off 2021 above the US$2,800 per tonne mark after rallying for most of the second half of 2020. A recovery in the steel sector helped the base metal throughout the first half of 2021 as COVID-19 lockdown measures eased, supporting demand for zinc.

Commenting on the main trends seen in the market in 2021, Helen O’Cleary of CRU Group told INN zinc’s demand recovery was stronger than expected in the US and Europe, but lagged in Asia excluding China.

In October, zinc prices hit their highest level in 14 years, hovering around the US$3,800 mark on the back of the power crisis and costs associated with carbon emissions.

“Zinc’s price outperformed expectations in 2021 on the back of strong demand and smelter disruption, particularly in Q4, when European smelters started to cut back due to record high energy prices,” O’Cleary said.

One of the world’s top zinc smelters, Nyrstar (EBR:NYR), said back in October that it was planning to cut production at its European smelter operations. Mining giant Glencore (LSE:GLEN,OTC Pink:GLCNF) also said it was adjusting production to reduce exposure to peak power pricing periods during the day.

Speaking with INN, Carlos Sanchez of CPM Group said zinc has been in recovery since prices bottomed out in 2020, helped in part by vaccination efforts globally and also by supply disruptions around the world.

“The most recent issue is the concern about high energy input costs into smelters in Europe — that's been pushing prices higher recently,” he said. Even though prices could not sustain that level until the end of the year, zinc remained above US$3,500 on the last trading day of 2021.

Zinc outlook 2022: Supply and demand


As mentioned, demand for base metals took an upward turn in 2021 as the world economy recovered on the back of stimulus plans and as vaccination rollouts took place in many parts of the world.

Looking at what’s ahead for zinc demand in 2022, CRU is expecting Chinese demand growth to slow to 1.1 percent year-on-year as the effects of stimulus wane.

“In the world ex-China we expect demand to grow by 2.4 percent, with the ongoing auto sector recovery partially offsetting the construction sector slowdown in Europe and the US,” O’Cleary said.

CPM is also expecting zinc demand to remain healthy in 2022, both inside and outside of China, including demand from developing countries. “One thing that remains uncertain is what will happen with COVID,” Sanchez said.

Moving onto the supply side of the picture, the analyst expects that if everything remains status quo, disruptions are unlikely to happen.

“There are going to be some blips here and there, but there have been some labor issues in Peru; yes, there's been some energy problems in Europe and China, but that's a fact in zinc output and in demand to an extent,” Sanchez said. “But really the catalyst that we don't know, and how it can affect prices, is how COVID will impact industries.”

For her part, O’Cleary is expecting most disruptions to happen in the first quarter, with CRU currently having a disruption allowance of 55,000 tonnes for that period.

“But this may well tip over into Q2,” she said. CRU is expecting mine supply to grow by 5.1 percent year-on-year in 2022, and for the concentrates market to register a 190,000 tonne surplus.

Meanwhile, smelter output is forecast to grow by less than 1 percent year-on-year in 2022, according to the firm, which is currently forecasting a small refined zinc deficit in 2022.

“Should smelter disruption exceed our 55,000 tonne allowance the deficit could grow,” O’Cleary said. “But high prices and a tight Chinese market could lead to further releases of refined zinc from the State Reserve Bureau stockpile, which could push the market towards balance or even a small surplus.”

Similarly, CPM is expecting the market to shift into a deficit in 2022. “That's due to the strong demand, recovering economies of COVID and its financial economic effects,” Sanchez said.

Zinc outlook 2022: What’s ahead


Commenting on how zinc might perform next year, O’Cleary said prices are likely to remain high in Q1 due to the threat of further energy-related cutbacks in Europe during the winter heating season.

O’Cleary suggested investors keep an eye on high prices and inflation, as they could hamper zinc demand growth.

Similarly, CPM expects prices to stay above current levels and to average around US$3,400 for the year. “I wouldn't be surprised to see zinc top US$4,000,” Sanchez said. “But at the same time, I don't think it holds above there; you'd have to have really strong fundamentals for that to happen, stronger than what's happening now.”

The CPM director suggested zinc investors should keep an eye on COVID-19 developments and be quick movers, taking a position whether it's short or long.

Looking ahead, FocusEconomics analysts see prices for zinc cooling markedly next year before falling further in 2023, as output gradually improves and new mines come online.

“Moreover, fading logistical disruptions and easing energy prices will exert additional downward pressure, although solid demand for steel will continue to support prices,” they said in their December report, adding that pandemic-related uncertainty is clouding the zinc outlook.

Panelists recently polled by the firm see prices averaging US$2,827 in Q4 2022, and US$2,651 in Q4 2023.

Don’t forget to follow us @INN_Resource for real-time news updates.

Securities Disclosure: I, Priscila Barrera, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.

Editorial Disclosure: The Investing News Network does not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the information reported in the interviews it conducts. The opinions expressed in these interviews do not reflect the opinions of the Investing News Network and do not constitute investment advice. All readers are encouraged to perform their own due diligence.

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Taylor Wimpey share price up 3% as housebuilder promises to return more cash to investors

The Taylor Wimpey share price has risen by 3.3% today, reversing some of the…
The post Taylor Wimpey share price up 3% as housebuilder promises to return more cash to investors first appeared on Trading and Investment News.

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The Taylor Wimpey share price has risen by 3.3% today, reversing some of the losses taken over a bad start to the year that has seen the housebuilder’s valuation decline by over 10%, after the company today promised investors it would return more cash to them over coming months. The windfall comes as a result of what Taylor Wimpey described as an “excellent” 2021.

Demand for larger properties, especially houses with gardens, has leapt as a result of the pandemic. As well families spending more time at home desiring more space, buyers were further encouraged to take the leap by the stamp duty holiday that ran from 2020 until late last year, offering savings of up to £15,000. Rock bottom interest rates and fierce competition between providers also led to cheaper mortgages which helped maximise selling prices.

taylor wimpey plc

The combination of favourable headwinds means the homebuilder expects to now realise an operating profit of £820 million for 2021 from the sale of a little under 14,000 homes. That represents a growth of 47% in the number of new-built properties delivered compared to 2020, when construction work and administrative processes were delayed by Covid-19 disruption.

As a result, Taylor Wimpey finished last year with a bank balance of £837 million. It will now, it says, see how much cash is left once it has paid out its dividend and planned for expenses over the rest of the year. Any “excess cash” surplus will be returned to shareholders, most likely through a major share buyback. The company will confirm details alongside its full-year results, due to be reported in March.

Taylor Wimpey is worth around £6 billion and is a member of the FTSE 100. It has existed in its present format since 2007 when created out of a merger between the housebuilders George Wimpey and Taylor Woodrow. The deal was legendarily struck by current chief executive Pete Redfern at a service station on the M40.

Despite sector concerns over how much it will cost to replace dangerous cladding used on buildings over the past 20 years and now banned as a result of the Grenfell Tower scandal, Taylor Wimpey has repeatedly stated it is confident the £165 million it has set aside to cover related expenses will suffice. It has been challenged on the sum but still considers it a “reasonable estimate”.

If the cladding provision does prove sufficient, that should leave plenty of cash for redistribution to investors through a major share buyback over 2022.

The post Taylor Wimpey share price up 3% as housebuilder promises to return more cash to investors first appeared on Trading and Investment News.

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Zinc Outlook 2022: Small Refined Zinc Deficit Ahead

Click here to read the previous zinc outlook. Following an uncertain 2020, zinc prices steadily rose throughout 2021 to hit a 14 year high in the second half of the year.The power crisis and an increasing demand for the base metal as the strict lockdown..

Published

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Click here to read the previous zinc outlook.

Following an uncertain 2020, zinc prices steadily rose throughout 2021 to hit a 14 year high in the second half of the year.

The power crisis and an increasing demand for the base metal as the strict lockdown restrictions were lifted supported prices during the 12 month period.

As the new year begins, the Investing News Network (INN) caught up with analysts to find out what’s ahead for zinc supply, demand and prices.


Zinc outlook 2022: 2021 in review


Prices kicked off the year above the US$2,800 per tonne mark after rallying for most of the second half of 2020. The recovery in the steel sector helped the base metal throughout the first half of 2021 as COVID-19 lockdown measures eased, supporting demand for zinc.

Commenting on the main trends seen in the market in 2021, Helen O’Cleary of CRU Group told INN zinc’s demand recovery was stronger than expected in the US and Europe but lagged in Asia excluding China.

In October, zinc prices hit their highest level in 14 years, hovering around the US$3,800 mark on the back of the power crisis and cost associated with carbon emissions.

“Zinc’s price outperformed expectations in 2021 on the back of strong demand and smelter disruption, particularly in Q4 when European smelters started to cut back due to record high energy prices,” O’Cleary said.

One of the world’s top zinc smelters, Nyrstar (EBR:NYR), said in October it was planning to cut production at its European smelter operations. Mining giant Glencore (LSE:GLEN) also said it was adjusting production to reduce exposure to peak power pricing periods during the day.

Speaking with INN about zinc’s performance, Carlos Sanchez of CPM Group said zinc has been in recovery since prices bottomed out in 2020, helped in part by vaccination globally and also by supply disruptions around the world.

“The most recent issue is the concern about high energy input costs into smelters in Europe — that's been pushing prices higher recently,” he said.

Even though prices could not sustain that level until the end of the year, prices remained above US$3,500 on the last trading day of 2021.

Zinc outlook 2022: Supply and demand


As mentioned, demand for base metals saw an upward turn in 2021 as the world economy recovered on the back of stimulus plans and as vaccination rollouts took place in many parts of the world.

Looking at what’s ahead for demand in 2022, CRU is expecting Chinese demand growth to slow to 1.1 percent year-on-year as the effects of stimulus wane.

“In the world ex. China we expect demand to grow by 2.4 percent, with the ongoing auto sector recovery partially offsetting the construction sector slowdown in Europe and the US,” O’Cleary said.

CPM is also expecting demand to remain healthy in 2022, both in China and outside of China, including demand from developing countries.

“One thing that remains uncertain is what will happen with COVID,” Sanchez said.

Moving onto the supply side of the picture, the analyst expects that if everything remains status quo, disruptions are unlikely to happen.

“There are going to be some blips here and there, but there have been some labor issues in Peru, yes, there's been some energy problems in Europe and China, but that's a fact in zinc output and in demand to an extent,” Sanchez said. “But really the catalysts that we don't know, and how it can affect prices is how COVID will impact industries.”

For her part, O’Cleary is expecting most disruptions in Q1, with CRU currently having a disruption allowance of 55,000 tonnes for that period.

“But this may well tip over into Q2,” she said. CRU is expecting mine supply to grow by 5.10 percent year-on-year in 2022 and for the concentrates market to register a 190,000 tonnes surplus.

Meanwhile, smelter output is forecast to grow by less than 1 percent year-on-year in 2022, according to the firm, which is currently forecasting a small refined zinc deficit in 2022.

“Should smelter disruption exceed our 55,000 t allowance the deficit could grow,” O’Cleary said. “But high prices and a tight Chinese market could lead to further releases of refined zinc from the State Reserves Bureau stockpile, which could push the market towards balance or even a small surplus.”

Similarly, CPM Group is also expecting the market to shift into a deficit in 2022.

“That's due to the strong demand, recovering economies of COVID and its financial economic effects,” Sanchez said.

Zinc outlook 2022: What’s ahead


Commenting on how prices might perform next year, O’Cleary said prices are likely to remain high in Q1 due to the threat of further energy-related cutbacks in Europe during the winter heating season.

O’Cleary suggested investors to keep an eye on high prices and inflation, as these factors could hamper zinc demand growth.

Similarly, CPM Group is expecting prices to remain above current levels and to average around US$3,400 for the year.

“I wouldn't be surprised to see zinc top US$4,000,” Sanchez said. “But at the same time, I don't think it holds above there; you'd have to have really strong fundamentals for that to happen, stronger than what's happening now.”

The CPM director suggested zinc investors should keep an eye on COVID developments and be quick movers, taking a position whether it's short or long.

Looking ahead, for FocusEconomics analysts, prices for zinc are seen cooling markedly next year before falling further in 2023, as output gradually improves and new mines come online.

“Moreover, fading logistical disruptions and easing energy prices will exert additional downward pressure, although solid demand for steel will continue to support prices,” they said in their December report, adding that pandemic-related uncertainty clouds the outlook.

Panelists recently polled by the firm see prices averaging US$2,827 per metric tonne in Q4 2022 and US$2,651 per metric tonne in Q4 2023.

Don’t forget to follow us @INN_Resource for real-time news updates.

Securities Disclosure: I, Priscila Barrera, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.

Editorial Disclosure: The Investing News Network does not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the information reported in the interviews it conducts. The opinions expressed in these interviews do not reflect the opinions of the Investing News Network and do not constitute investment advice. All readers are encouraged to perform their own due diligence.

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