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Hertz Foundation announces 2022 Hertz fellows

The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation today announced the recipients of the prestigious 2022 Hertz Fellowships in applied science, mathematics and engineering….

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The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation today announced the recipients of the prestigious 2022 Hertz Fellowships in applied science, mathematics and engineering.

Credit: Fannie and John Hertz Foundation

The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation today announced the recipients of the prestigious 2022 Hertz Fellowships in applied science, mathematics and engineering.

This year’s fellowships will fund 13 remarkable doctoral students who demonstrate extraordinary potential to become foremost leaders in their fields and tackle the most significant challenges facing the nation and the world. The fellowship will directly support researchers interested in defending the nation’s digital infrastructure against cyberthreats, developing more efficient electronics that can help reduce dependence on fossil fuels, and creating biomedical devices to aid rehabilitation and cancer diagnostics.

“To remain a global leader in science and technology, our nation requires enterprising minds capable of inventing creative solutions to real problems,” said Robbee Baker Kosak, president of the Hertz Foundation. “We’re thrilled to be able to support these promising innovators and fuel their research at such a pivotal time in their careers.”

Since 1963, the Hertz Foundation has granted fellowships empowering the nation’s most promising young minds in science and technology. Hertz Fellows receive five years of funding, valued up to $250,000, which offers flexibility from the traditional constraints of graduate training and the independence needed to pursue research that best advances our security and economic vitality.

In addition to receiving financial support, Hertz Fellows join a multigenerational, intellectual community of peers, which offers a unique engine for professional development and collaboration. Hertz Fellows have access to lifelong programming, such as mentoring, events, and networking, which has led them to form research collaborations, commercialize technology, and create and invest in early-stage companies together, among other opportunities.

Among the past recipients of the Hertz Fellowship are Nobel laureate John Mather, a NASA astrophysicist and project scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope; Kim Budil, director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Nathan Myhrvold, founder and CEO of Intellectual Ventures, founding director of Microsoft Research, and former chief technology officer at Microsoft; Kathleen Fisher, deputy office director for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Information Innovation Office; and neuroscientist Ed Boyden of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who is developing optogenetic technologies to understand and treat brain conditions such as Parkinson’s disease. 

The Hertz Foundation is dedicated to expanding and accelerating the U.S. pipeline of scientific and technical leadership. Through a rigorous and time-tested selection process, led by Hertz Fellow Philip Welkhoff, director of the malaria program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the fellowship selection committee sought out candidates demonstrating deep, interconnecting knowledge and the extraordinary creativity necessary to tackle problems that others can’t solve.

“John Hertz’s vision was that as new challenges arise, a vibrant and innovative cadre of researchers in the applied sciences was essential for facing and overcoming them,” said Welkhoff. “This cohort of Hertz Fellows embodies these values in so many unique and individual ways. I am delighted to welcome them into the Hertz community and to see what they achieve in the decades ahead.”

The 2022 class joins a community of fellows comprising some of the nation’s most noted science and technology leaders, whose transformative research and innovation impact our lives every day. Hertz Fellows have increased the accessibility of ultrasounds with the invention of a low-cost handheld device and helped prove the big-bang theory of the universe. They are using machine learning to investigate disparities in COVID-19 testing and develop collaborative research tools. They have saved lives with a simple test that reveals fake pharmaceuticals, are influencing companies to institute environmentally sound practices, and are developing aircraft powered by hydrogen fuel cells for energy-efficient, lower-cost transportation.

Over the foundation’s 59-year history of awarding fellowships, more than 1,200 Hertz Fellows have established a remarkable track record of accomplishments. Their ranks include two Nobel laureates; recipients of eight Breakthrough Prizes and three MacArthur Foundation “genius awards”; and winners of the Turing Award, the Fields Medal, the National Medal of Technology and the National Medal of Science. In addition, 48 are members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, and 32 are fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Hertz Fellows hold over 3,000 patents, have founded more than 375 companies, and have created hundreds of thousands of science and technology jobs.

Introducing the 2022 Hertz Fellows

Fellows are listed with their graduate university affiliations and fields of interest.

Roderick Bayliss III
University of California, Berkeley
Power Electronics

Roderick Bayliss wants to design more efficient and power-dense electronics, a step toward reducing the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. Currently a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, Bayliss has already carried out work developing novel types of power converters — devices that change the current, voltage or frequency of electrical energy — and inductors, which store energy. He received both his bachelor’s degree and his master’s degree in electrical engineering from MIT.

Nikhil Bhattasali
New York University
Neuroscience, Artificial Intelligence

Nikhil Bhattasali is interested in understanding biological intelligence to build better artificial intelligence. Inspired by animal nervous systems, he assembles computational models that can control embodied agents and robots. Currently a NeuroAI Scholar at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Bhattasali conducts highly interdisciplinary research combining machine learning, systems neuroscience and computer science. Bhattasali received both his bachelor’s degree in symbolic systems and his master’s degree in computer science from Stanford University. He will be joining the doctorate program in computer science at New York University in fall 2022. 

Alexander Cohen
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Mathematics

Alexander Cohen studies how waves interfere with each other — a topic of mathematics that has far-reaching implications across computer science, physics and number theory. Cohen is a first-year graduate student at MIT, and he graduated from Yale University in 2021 with a dual bachelor’s and master’s degree in mathematics. He was awarded a Goldwater Scholarship for his work and an honorable mention for the Morgan Prize — one of the highest undergraduate honors in mathematics.

Wenjie Gong
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Physics

Wenjie Gong is interested in the intersection between quantum information and physical systems. Her goal is to develop scalable, stable and noiseless quantum devices that can push technology past the classical era. Gong is currently finishing her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Harvard University, where she has already made significant inroads into understanding quantum phenomena in the fundamental constituents of matter. She will begin her doctorate in quantum information theory at MIT in fall 2022.

Jonah Herzog-Arbeitman
Princeton University
Physics

Jonah Herzog-Arbeitman is a condensed matter physicist working toward the discovery of new states of matter and the development of quantum materials. He hopes to tackle high-temperature superconductivity — the challenge of keeping superconductors stable at anything other than extreme cold temperatures. Herzog-Arbeitman studied physics, math and poetry as an undergraduate at Princeton University. Now a first-year graduate student at Princeton University, he is active in mentorship programs that demystify academia and the path to a career in research.

David Li 
Stanford University
Bioengineering

David Li aims to develop transformative technologies that enable new biological insights, approaches and therapies. Throughout his undergraduate career at MIT, Li worked on tools for gene editing, directed evolution and COVID-19 diagnostics. Li will spend time abroad in the U.K. as a Marshall Scholar, studying the structure of amyloid filaments at the MRC Lab of Molecular Biology through Cambridge University before pursuing a doctorate in bioengineering at Stanford University. He received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT in 2022.

Daniel Longenecker
Princeton University
Physics

Daniel Longenecker studies scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory and string theory at Princeton University, where he is a first-year graduate student. His goal is to contribute to the reformulation of quantum field theory by discovering new principles and mathematical structures. During his time as an undergraduate at Cornell University, where he received his bachelor’s in physics and physics education in 2021, Longenecker discovered a new connection between string theory and mathematical linguistics.

Scott Barrow Moroch
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Physics

Scott Moroch is an experimental physicist pursuing research at the intersection of atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Using tabletop experiments, Moroch hopes to shed new light on the standard model of particle physics. He is currently a graduate student at MIT and received his undergraduate degree in physics from the University of Maryland in 2021. 

Vivek Nair
University of California, Berkeley
Computer Science

Vivek Nair develops cutting-edge cryptographic techniques to defend digital infrastructure against sophisticated cyberthreats. Currently a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley and a researcher at Cornell’s Initiative for Cryptocurrencies and Contracts, Nair is also the founder of Multifactor.com and holds multiple patents for secure user authentication technologies. He was the youngest-ever recipient of bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

Syamantak Payra
Stanford University
Engineering

Syamantak Payra is a scientist and engineer who is passionate about creating new biomedical devices to solve unmet health care needs. A senior at MIT, Payra has created digital fibers for electronic garments that can assist in diagnosing illnesses and has contributed to next-generation space suit prototypes that could better protect astronauts on spacewalks, among many other projects. He will begin his doctorate at Stanford University in fall 2022.

Shuvom Sadhuka
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Computational Biology

Shuvom Sadhuka wants to apply mathematical algorithmic principles to the biological sciences to help create more efficient, private and robust tools for analyzing biological — especially genomic — data. In particular, he hopes to leverage ideas from algorithmic privacy, machine learning and data structures to create safe and efficient methods to accelerate biomedical research. He will receive his bachelor’s degree in computer science and statistics in spring 2022 from Harvard University and plans to pursue a graduate degree in computer science at MIT.

Emily Trimm
Stanford University
Biophysics, Medicine

An MD-PhD student in biophysics at Stanford University, Emily Trimm is interested in combining genomics with innovative biophysical techniques to address some of the biggest unanswered questions in human disease. Her current research uses multiomic data from high-altitude species, such as guinea pigs, alpine ibex and snow leopards, to study how the cells lining veins and arteries respond to physical force. She received her bachelor’s degree in physics and biophysics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2018.

Anonymous
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Physics

About the Hertz Foundation

The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation identifies the nation’s most promising innovators in science and technology and empowers them to pursue solutions to our toughest challenges. Launched in 1963, the Hertz Fellowship is the most prestigious fellowship program in the U.S., fueling more than 1,200 leaders, disruptors and creators who apply their remarkable talents where they’re needed most — from our national security to the future of health care. Hertz Fellows hold 3,000+ patents, have founded 375+ companies, and have received 200+ major national and international awards, including two Nobel Prizes, eight Breakthrough Prizes, the National Medal of Technology, the Fields Medal and the Turing Award. Learn more at HertzFoundation.org.


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Cruise Line Drops Pre-Cruise Covid Testing Rule

The major cruise lines walk a delicate line. They need to take the actual steps required to keep their passengers safe and they also need to be aware of…

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The major cruise lines walk a delicate line. They need to take the actual steps required to keep their passengers safe and they also need to be aware of how things look to the outside public. It's a mix of practical covid policy balanced with covid theater.

You have to do the right thing -- and Royal Caribbean International (RCL) - Get Royal Caribbean Group Report, Carnival Cruise Lines (CCL) - Get Carnival Corporation Report, and Norwegian Cruise Lines (NCLH) - Get Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. Report have been doing that with very meticulous protocols-- but you also have to show the general public you're taking the pandemic seriously. The cruise industry has been under the microscope of both public perception and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) since covid first appeared.

That's not because you're likely to get infected on a cruise ship than at a concert, sporting event, theme park, restaurant, or any other crowded space. It's because when you get sick at one of those locations nobody can pinpoint the source of your infection

Cruises last from 3 days to 7 days or even longer and that means that some people will get covid onboard and that will be blamed on the cruise industry. To mitigate that Carnival, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian have rigid protocols in place that require passengers 12 and over to be vaccinated as well as pre-cruise covid tests taken no more than two days before your cruise leaves.

Once cruise line has dropped that testing requirement (at least on a few sailings) and that could lead Royal Caribbean, Carnival, and Norwegian to follow. 

Sina Schuldt/picture alliance via Getty

Holland America Drops Some Covid Testing

As the largest cruise lines sailing from the U.S., Royal Caribbean, Carnival, and Norwegian don't want to be the first to make major covid policy changes. They acted more or less in tandem when it came to loosening, then dropping mask rules and have generally followed the lead of the CDC, even when that agency's rules became optional.

Now, Holland America cruise line has dropped pre-cruise covid testing on a handful of cruises. It's a minor move, but it does provide cover and precedent for Royal Caribbean, Carnival, and Norwegian to eventually do the same.

"Holland America Line becomes the first US-based cruise line to remove testing for select cruises. Unfortunately for those taking a cruise from the United States, the new protocols are only in place for certain cruises onboard the company’s latest ship, the Rotterdam, in Europe," Cruisehive reported.

The current CDC guidelines do recommend pre-cruise testing, but the cruise lines into following those rules. By picking cruises sailing out of Europe, Holland America avoids picking a fight with the federal agency just yet, but it will be able to gather data as to whether the pre-cruise testing actually helps.

Holland America has not changed its vaccination requirements for those cruises which mirror the 12-and-up rule used by Royal Caribbean, Carnival, and Norwegian.

Some guests have called for the end of the testing requirement because they believe it's more theater than precaution because people can test and then contract covid while traveling to their cruise.

The Current Cruise Protocols Work

Royal Caribbean President Michael Bayley does expect changes to come in his cruise line's covid protocols, and he talked about them during Royal Caribbean's recent President's Cruise, the Royal Caribbean Blog reported.

"I think pre cruise testing is going to be around for another couple of months," Bayley told passengers during a question and answer session. "We obviously want it to go back to normal, but we're incredibly cognizant of our responsibilities to keep our crew, the communities and our guests safe."

People do still get covid onboard despite the crew being 100% vaccinated and all passengers 12 and over being vaccinated, but the protocols have worked well when it comes to preventing serious illness.

Bayley said that the CDC shared some information with him in a call.

"The cruise industry sailing out of the US ports over the past 12 months and how many people have been hospitalized with Covid and how many deaths occurred from Covid from people who'd sailed on the industry's ships, which is in the millions," he said, "And the number of people who died from COVID who'd sailed on ships over the past year was two."

That success may be why the major cruise lines are reluctant to make changes. The current rules, even if they're partially for show, have been incredibly effective.

"Two is terrible. But but but against the context of everything we've seen, that's it's truly been a remarkable success." he added.

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Visualizing A Decade Of Population Growth And Decline In US Counties

Visualizing A Decade Of Population Growth And Decline In US Counties

There are a number of factors that determine how much a region’s population…

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Visualizing A Decade Of Population Growth And Decline In US Counties

There are a number of factors that determine how much a region’s population changes.

If an area sees a high number of migrants, along with a strong birth rate and low death rate, then its population is bound to increase over time. On the flip side, as Visual Capitalists Nick Routley details below, if more people are leaving the area than coming in, and the region’s birth rate is low, then its population will likely decline.

Which areas in the United States are seeing the most growth, and which places are seeing their populations dwindle?

This map, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, shows a decade of population movement across U.S. counties, painting a detailed picture of U.S. population growth between 2010 and 2020.

Counties With The Biggest Population Growth from 2010-2020

To calculate population estimates for each county, the U.S. Census Bureau does the following calculations:

      A county’s base population → plus births → minus deaths → plus migration = new population estimate

From 2010 to 2020, Maricopa County in Arizona saw the highest increase in its population estimate. Over a decade, the county gained 753,898 residents. Below are the counties that saw the biggest increases in population:

Phoenix and surrounding areas grew faster than any other major city in the country. The region’s sunny climate and amenities are popular with retirees, but another draw is housing affordability. Families from more expensive markets—California in particular—are moving to the city in droves. This is a trend that spilled over into the pandemic era as more people moved into remote and hybrid work situations.

Texas counties saw a lot of growth as well, with five of the top 10 gainers located in the state of Texas. A big draw for Texas is its relatively affordable housing market. In 2021, average home prices in the state stood at $172,500$53,310 below the national average.

Counties With The Biggest Population Drops from 2010-2020

On the opposite end of the spectrum, here’s a look at the top 10 counties that saw the biggest declines in their populations over the decade:

The largest drops happened in counties along the Great Lakes, including Cook County (which includes the city of Chicago) and Wayne County (which includes the city of Detroit).

For many of these counties, particularly those in America’s “Rust Belt”, population drops over this period were a continuation of decades-long trends. Wayne County is an extreme example of this trend. From 1970 to 2020, the area lost one-third of its population.

U.S. Population Growth in Percentage Terms (2010-2020)

While the map above is great at showing where the greatest number of Americans migrated, it downplays big changes in counties with smaller populations.

For example, McKenzie County in North Dakota, with a 2020 population of just 15,242, was the fastest-growing U.S. county over the past decade. The county’s 138% increase was driven primarily by the Bakken oil boom in the area. High-growth counties in Texas also grew as new sources of energy were extracted in rural areas.

The nation’s counties are evenly divided between population increase and decline, and clear patterns emerge.

Pandemic Population Changes

More recent population changes reflect longer-term trends. During the COVID-19 pandemic, many of the counties that saw the strongest population increases were located in high-growth states like Florida and Texas.

Below are the 20 counties that grew the most from 2020 to 2021.

Many of these counties are located next to large cities, reflecting a shift to the suburbs and larger living spaces. However, as COVID-19 restrictions ease, and the pandemic housing boom tapers off due to rising interest rates, it remains to be seen whether the suburban shift will continue, or if people begin to migrate back to city centers.

Tyler Durden Sat, 07/02/2022 - 21:00

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Tesla EV deliveries fall nearly 18% in second quarter following China factory shutdown

Tesla delivered 254,695 electric vehicles globally in the second quarter, a nearly 18% drop from the previous period as supply chain constraints, China’s…

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Tesla delivered 254,695 electric vehicles globally in the second quarter, a nearly 18% drop from the previous period as supply chain constraints, China’s extended COVID-19 lockdown and challenges around opening factories in Berlin and Austin took their toll on the company.

This is the first time in two years that Tesla deliveries, which were 310,048 in the first period this year, have fallen quarter over quarter. Tesla deliveries were up 26.5% from the second quarter last year.

The quarter-over-quarter reduction is in line with a broader supply chain problem in the industry. It also illustrates the importance of Tesla’s Shanghai factory to its business. Tesla shuttered its Shanghai factory multiple times in March due to rising COVID-19 cases that prompted a government shutdown.

Image Credits: Tesla/screenshot

The company said Saturday it produced 258,580 EVs, a 15% reduction from the previous quarter when it made 305,407 vehicles.

Like in other quarters over the past two years, most of the produced and delivered vehicles were Model 3 and Model Ys. Only 16,411 of the produced vehicles were the older Model S and Model X vehicles.

Tesla said in its released that June 2022 was the highest vehicle production month in Tesla’s history. Despite that milestone, the EV maker as well as other companies in the industry, have struggled to keep apace with demand as supply chain problems persist.

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