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Catalytic Investment to Improve Community Health Care for Millions Across Africa

Catalytic Investment to Improve Community Health Care for Millions Across Africa
PR Newswire
GENEVA, Aug. 8, 2022

The Global Fund collaborates with the Johnson & Johnson Foundation and the Skoll Foundation to Launch the Africa Frontline First C…

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Catalytic Investment to Improve Community Health Care for Millions Across Africa

PR Newswire

The Global Fund collaborates with the Johnson & Johnson Foundation and the Skoll Foundation to Launch the Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund

  • Private sector investments to the Global Fund's Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund from the Johnson & Johnson Foundation and the Skoll Foundation totaling US$ 25 million.
  • The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria intends to further match this commitment by at least with 1:1.
  • Designed in partnership with the Africa Frontline First Initiative, the Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund (AFF-CF) will accelerate scale up of community health services in up to 10 African countries.
  • The Catalytic Fund seeks to mobilize at least $100 million to improve community health systems that are providing essential medical care for up to 130 million people.
  • Investing in frontline community health workers can generate a return of up to 10:1 when considering the improved economic, health, and social outcomes of community health workers.

GENEVA, Aug. 8, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Today the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria is announcing a crucial new catalytic fund to support community health workers across up to 10 African countries. The Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund (AFF-CF) will provide financing to accelerate and sustain the scale up of frontline community health workers, the backbone of community health services.

The Global Fund warmly welcomes the first investments to the Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund from the Johnson & Johnson Foundation and the Skoll Foundation totaling US $25 million. The Global Fund intends to match these and other investments to bolster support to and domestic financing for community health workers.

These pledges come ahead of the Global Fund's Seventh Replenishment, which aims to raise US $18 billion to fund its next three-year cycle of grants. The Global Fund estimates that the funding of US $18 billion would save 20 million lives, while strengthening health and community systems to reinforce pandemic preparedness.

"For the first time in 20 years, many countries have seen HIV, TB and malaria cases worsen and community health workers are at the forefront of fighting these diseases. This is a unique moment for leaders to join forces and invest in the people and structures that will fight pandemics, infectious diseases, and other health threats, now and in the future" said Peter Sands, Executive Director of The Global Fund.

A professionalized workforce of community health workers, who work hand in hand with communities, is key to responding to future outbreaks and making gains on longstanding priorities. The Global Fund applauds these initial pledges from the Johnson & Johnson Foundation and the Skoll Foundation, but much more financial investment is needed to unlock the full potential and to ensure people access to professionalized, trained, compensated, and integrated community health workers.

The Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund will help ensure that up to 10 African countries accelerate progress and improve health care delivered at the community level, as well as crucially ensure the women, who make up the large proportion of community health workers, are properly paid for their work. The Catalytic Fund will combine coordinated technical assistance and implementation funding, as well as investments to scale financing, employ digital tools, increase the availability of essential life-saving commodities, and better integrate community health workers within the overall health system.

"Health workers are the cornerstone of care. By training, empowering, and integrating community health workers into existing health systems it's possible to extend care and reduce the burden of disease for millions of people." said Joaquin Duato, CEO of Johnson & Johnson. "The Johnson & Johnson Foundation committed $15 million to the Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund to ensure delivery of effective, efficient, and equitable care at the frontlines."

The Global Fund Catalytic Fund approach has already shown the power of leveraging philanthropic funding. For example, support from the Children's Investment Fund Foundation for HIV self-testing has increased funding fivefold in two years and increased HIV self-test procurement from thousands to millions in the five countries where it works.

"On the frontlines of pandemic response and prevention, community health workers are critical to bringing essential healthcare to the last mile," said Don Gips, CEO of the Skoll Foundation. "The Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund brings the power of social innovators like the Financing Alliance for Health and Last Mile Health together with the strength of the Global Fund to ensure that community health workers are paid, trained, and equipped to maintain essential services and lead responses to COVID-19, Ebola, and other outbreaks."

This catalytic investment is a first step towards a broader shared ambition to scale community health, contributing to expanding universal health coverage. As part of this effort,

Africa Frontline First is collaborating with the COVID-19 Commission, which supports H.E. President Ramaphosa in his role as the African Union Champion on COVID-19. In line with the African Union's New Public Health Order, this collaboration pursues the AU's broader target of deploying 2 million community health workers by 2030.

More than 85% of community health workers in Africa, the majority of whom are women, are not paid for their work.  Experience shows that professional community health workers - who are paid, trained, and supervised - are best equipped to provide essential health services in their communities, even amid great challenges.

"In Liberia and around the world, we have seen the power of community health workers to deliver essential care in rural and remote communities - and to maintain that care during crises like the Ebola epidemic and the COVID-19 pandemic," said Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Nobel Peace Prize recipient and former President of Liberia. "The Africa Frontline First Catalytic Fund is a unique opportunity to invest in those health workers and catalyze real change, creating a healthier and safer world for all."

The Global Fund is a worldwide movement to defeat HIV, TB and malaria and ensure a healthier, safer, more equitable future for all. We raise and invest more than US$4 billion a year to fight the deadliest infectious diseases, challenge the injustice which fuels them and strengthen health systems in more than 100 of the hardest hit countries. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have invested an additional US$4.3 billion to fight the new pandemic and reinforce systems for health. We unite world leaders, communities, civil society, health workers and the private sector to find solutions that have the most impact, and we take them to scale worldwide. Since 2002, the Global Fund has saved 44 million lives.

Africa Frontline First is a collaborative effort by the Financing Alliance for Health, Last Mile Health, the Community Health Acceleration Partnership, and Community Health Impact Coalition under the championship of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

Information on the work of the Global Fund is available at www.theglobalfund.org
Information on Africa Frontline First is available at  www.africafrontlinefirst.org

Follow the Global Fund on Twitter: http://twitter.com/globalfund
Follow Africa Frontline First on Twitter: https://twitter.com/frontline1st

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SOURCE The Global Fund

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Economics

Why WWE could be a good stock to buy/hold in October

World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. (NYSE:WWE) remains in defensive mode as the stock market crumbles. A year-to-date return of 37.40% makes the stock one…

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World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. (NYSE:WWE) remains in defensive mode as the stock market crumbles. A year-to-date return of 37.40% makes the stock one to hold for value preservation. This article finds WWE a good stock to trade when keenness and proper risk management are exercised.

WWE, as it is popularly known, is an integrated media and entertainment entity. It’s known for wrestling promotion, but related fields of film and American football widen its scope. 

Just like other entertainment companies, WWE was grounded by the Covid-19 disruption. As recovery began, the stock has never looked back. It has acted as a true momentum stock while maintaining an uptrend since the beginning of the year. There are clear fundamentals too.

In its second quarter, the company’s net revenue rose 24% to $328.2 million or £309.6 million. The revenue was above $322.4 million or £304.15 estimates. The earnings per share increased from $0.42 to $0.59. The company projects “strong revenue growth” in the third quarter. The raised guidance reflects rising content monetization, local media rights fees, and international ticket sales increases. 

WWE touches the bottom of the ascending channel

Source – TradingView

On the daily chart, momentum is weak on WWE as it corrected to $67. However, we can see that WWE is still maintaining the upside channel. 

Should you buy WWE

WWE has maintained momentum and recovers each time it hits the bottom of the ascending channel. The stock is a buy at the current level, preferably after recovering above the 50-day MA. Short-term traders can exit at the top of the ascending channel.

The post Why WWE could be a good stock to buy/hold in October appeared first on Invezz.

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Economics

Cities With Good Neighbors Have Lower-Than-Average Home Values

New York’s Rochester was identified took the top spot as the most neighborly city in the country.

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New York's Rochester was identified took the top spot as the most neighborly city in the country.

Many want the kind of neighbor who will stop by with fresh-baked cookies, offer gardening tips and take out the mail while they're away — a thing that, if you live in an urban mecca like New York, is just as likely as finding a spacious apartment that's available and within budget.

In honor of National Neighbor Day on Sept. 28, self-storage company Neighbor.com identified Rochester in the Finger Lakes region of New York state as the most neighborly city in the country.

The study analyzed both big and small cities through factors such as resident happiness levels and number of people volunteering their time to the community.

"It's not a surprise that Rochester is the most neighborly city this year, it's made this list each year," Joseph Woodbury, CEO and co-founder of Neighbor.com, said of the findings. "Oftentimes, we connect hospitality with small cities, but you’ll find that people in large cities are just as likely to go out of their way to help one another."

Correlation Between Neighborliness and Home Values

While Federal Reserve economic data pegs the median price of homes sold in 2022 at $428,000, the median list price identified by Realtor.com for Rochester is $150,000. 

Madison, Wis., and Provo, Utah followed Rochester as the most "neighborly" cities in the U.S. and have respective median list prices of $360,000 and $495,000.

Along with Provo, California's Oxnard breaks the list's mold with its high real estate prices — amid proximity to the beach (the city is about 60 miles from Los Angeles) and quaint Victoria architecture, the city has a median list price of $794,500.

Getty Images

Other cities on the list generally fall below the national average for a standard single-family home. Grand Rapids in Michigan has a median list price of $307,500 while that number is only $175,000 in Milwaukee, Wis.

Harrisburg, Pa., and Des Moines, Iowa are two other neighborly cities with respective list prices of $215,000 and $227,500. 

Good neighbors have long been a hallmark of smaller cities with a quieter way of life — metropolises like New York and Los Angeles have very high property values, they are not exactly known for being "friendly" or "welcoming."

With a median list price of $495,000, North Carolina's Raleigh is the largest city to make the list.

Those who think New Yorkers are unfriendly need only to look outside the five boroughs — with a median list price of $334,000, Poughkeepsie also made the list for its neighborliness.

Search For the Next Big Real Estate City

As sleepy towns that paint a TV image of "neighborliness" tend to have lower demand, they may not offer the kind of real estate growth potential that many investors are specifically looking for. 

But exceptions do exist — many small cities are currently in the midst of a real estate boon and, subsequently, an explosion in real estate values.

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According to the study's authors, many homebuyers looking to move have specifically started looking for "friendlier" cities after the pandemic and are driving up demand for formerly quiet places.

Realtor.com identified Utah's Salt Lake City, Idaho's Boise and Washington state's Spokane as 2022's fastest-growing real estate markets.

"Being neighborly goes beyond a friendly wave while driving down the street or offering to water plants while on vacation," Woodbury said. "To be neighborly is opening yourself up to building relationships and ultimately a community that is rooted in compassion, trust, and care."

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Economics

Here’s Why Your Boss May Reject Your Business Travel Request

People are taking vacations again, but a once dominant travel sector is struggling to recover.

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People are taking vacations again, but a once dominant travel sector is struggling to recover.

Now that vaccines are readily available and President Joe Biden has declared that the pandemic is officially over, people are flying again. But they’re really not happy about it.

The research firm J.D. Power found that last year, when the airline industry first started to cautiously rebound, consumer satisfaction with airports reached an all-time high. But this was very likely both because of a relatively smaller sample size and that so many people were happy to fly again that they were willing to overlook a lot of what has become headache-inducing about modern airfare travel.

J.D. Power  (JD) - Get JD.com Inc. Report has found that this year, global passenger levels are nearly back up to 91% of pre-pandemic levels. 

Customer satisfaction has dropped sharply, 25 points on a 1,000-point scale, to 777, as more people have returned to airports, for reasons ranging from an increase in flight cancellations and delays to inflation-driven increases in the cost of airport food.

But while airlines are aware that customers aren’t happy, and that the Biden Administration might try to right the ship with proposals that airlines likely won’t care for, at least people are flying again.

But an additional survey by J.D. Power has revealed that while people are flying again, traveling for business (be it for in-person meetings or industry conferences), has been lagging behind and recovering at nearly the rate of traveling for pleasure. 

Is Traveling for Business on the Way Out?

J.D. Power’s research has found that many travelers doubt that travel levels will increase dramatically from where they are now, and that “a strong majority of executives believe their companies will spend less in the next six months compared to the same period in 2019, for instance, due to things like fewer trips overall or fewer employees sent when there is a trip scheduled,” according to their data.

Overall, business travel has returned to “about 81% of 2019 levels,” notes Managing Director Michael Taylor. “83% was our prediction for this quarter, we’ll see how well we did in a few weeks and add a predication for Q4.”

J.D. Power

Fears of recession and the rising costs of air tickets from inflation play a factor in the decline of business travel. But overall, the main reason is that many of us have gotten so used to working at home that two-thirds of employees would rather find a new job than go back to the pre-pandemic status quo. If employees feel they can get work done from home and don’t feel like braving traffic to return to the office, why would they feel they need to get on a plane?

So have services like Zoom (ZM) - Get Zoom Video Communications Inc. Report and Slack made the business trip redundant? Taylor has his doubts.

“But will people be meeting exclusively in the 'Metaverse' rather than in person? I do not think that will happen,” he says. “There is too much information to be gathered in face-to-face meetings, spoken and unspoken, to be replaced completely by virtual ‘reality.’”

Getty Images

So is This It for Business Travel?

Back in the heady pre-pandemic days three years ago, airlines could rely on the extra income from people whose jobs entailed a great deal of travel, and who had come to the realization that if they were going to spend a chunk of their lives on the road, they could splurge to make it a more comfortable experience. 

But if airlines want this sector to return, Taylor thinks it’s their duty to make it a more appealing option, because frequent delays and other headaches are enough to make anyone stick to Zoom.

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Airlines, Taylor says, must “create more of a “living room” experience for travelers, one that “makes travelers feel valued as patrons of the airlines, and makes people feel like individuals rather than cattle.”

Because while it’s hard to argue with the convenience, Taylor insists there is still something to be said for the occasional in-person meeting. 

“Millenia of evolution in mankind has created an awareness that can’t be described with words on a page or pixels on a screen,” he says. “People will still find advantages in meeting in-person rather than online.”

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