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Solar energy market in South Africa to grow at a CAGR of 29.74% from 2021 to 2026: Sunny climatic conditions to drive growth – Technavio

Solar energy market in South Africa to grow at a CAGR of 29.74% from 2021 to 2026: Sunny climatic conditions to drive growth – Technavio
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NEW YORK, March 27, 2023

NEW YORK, March 27, 2023 /PRNewswire/ — The size of the solar energy mark…

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Solar energy market in South Africa to grow at a CAGR of 29.74% from 2021 to 2026: Sunny climatic conditions to drive growth - Technavio

PR Newswire

NEW YORK, March 27, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- The size of the solar energy market in South Africa is estimated to increase by 23.31 terawatt-hour units from 2021 to 2026. The market's growth momentum will accelerate at a CAGR of 29.74%. Sunny climatic conditions are driving market growth. South Africa is located in a latitude zone with higher solar radiation than other regions or countries. Government policies and high investments in solar PV projects are expected to increase the installed solar PV capacity of the country in the coming years. Such factors are expected to impact market growth during the forecast period positively. However, the high initial investment and maintenance costs for solar PV systems are challenging market growth. The generation of solar energy requires a large area for solar panels. The efficiency of solar panels can reduce due to intermittency problems, which increases the initial investment and maintenance costs. This, in turn, leads to a significant burden on household users, which limits the use of solar panels and solar cover glass for residential purposes. Such factors are expected to hinder the solar energy market growth in South Africa during the forecast period. Discover some insights about the market before buying the full report - Request a sample report

Solar energy market in South Africa – Vendor analysis
Vendor Landscape –

The solar energy market in South Africa is fragmented, with the presence of numerous international and regional players. A few prominent vendors in the market are ARTsolar Pty Ltd., Canadian Solar Inc., Enel SPA, ENGIE SA, IBC Solar AG, JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd., Renenergy South Africa Pty Ltd., Jiangsu Seraphim Solar System Co. Ltd., SunPower Corp., and Trina Solar Co. Ltd.

The competition among vendors is moderate, and their growth is dependent on R&D and innovations. Frequent changes in government policies, continuous developments in technology, and environmental regulations are driving the growth of the solar market in South Africa. The declining prices of solar PV systems and stringent regulations related to carbon emissions will further attract investors.

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Vendor offerings -

  • Canadian Solar Inc. - The company offers solar energy products under the BiHiKu7 brand. It offers solar modules, solar system kits, battery energy storage solutions, and other materials, components, and services.
  • IBC Solar AG - The company offers solar energy products under the Longi brand.
  • JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd - The company offers solar energy products under the Suntank brand.
  • ARTsolar Pty Ltd. - The company offers solar energy products under the Alpha brand. It also manufactures crystalline solar panels.
  • For details about vendors and their offerings – Request a sample report

Solar energy market in South Africa - Segmentation assessment

Segment overview
Technavio has segmented the market based on end-user (utility and rooftop) and application (grid-connected and off-grid).

  • The utility segment will account for a significant share of the market growth during the forecast period. A large number of installations of large-scale solar power plants for the generation of clean energy and reduction of carbon emissions is driving the growth of this segment. The energy can also be stored in energy storage systems when there is no sunlight. Such factors will increase the adoption of utility-scale solar power in South Africa during the forecast period.

For insights on market segments - Download a sample report

Solar energy market in South Africa Key trends

Scaling up renewables in transport will be a key trend in the solar energy market in South Africa. The country is focusing on carbon emission reduction and renewable energy to fulfill its energy requirements. For instance, Cape Town plans to procure only zero-emission vehicles by 2025. Its Electric Vehicle Framework includes leveraging EV roll-out and charging to increase the share of renewables. The city is considering mandating public EV charging stations to operate on renewable energy, which will require the electrification of transport systems. These factors, in turn, will accelerate the adoption of solar energy sources for power generation during the forecast period.

Trends have an impact on market dynamics, which can impact businesses. Find more insights in a sample report!

What are the key data covered in this report?

  • CAGR of the market during the forecast period
  • Detailed information about factors that will drive the growth of the solar energy market in South Africa between 2022 and 2026
  • Precise estimation of the size of the solar energy market in South Africa and its contribution to the parent market
  • Accurate predictions about upcoming trends and changes in consumer behavior
  • A thorough analysis of the market's competitive landscape and detailed information about vendors
  • Comprehensive analysis of factors that will challenge the growth vendors

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Solar Energy Market Scope in South Africa

Report Coverage

Details

Forecast period

2022-2026

Growth momentum & CAGR

Accelerate at a CAGR of 29.74%

Market growth 2022-2026

23.31 terawatt-hour units

Market structure

Fragmented

YoY growth 2021-2022 (%)

24.80

Competitive landscape

Leading vendors, market positioning of vendors, competitive strategies, and industry risks

Key companies profiled

ARTsolar Pty Ltd., Canadian Solar Inc., Enel SPA, ENGIE SA, IBC Solar AG, JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd., Renenergy South Africa Pty Ltd., Jiangsu Seraphim Solar System Co. Ltd., SunPower Corp., and Trina Solar Co. Ltd.

Market dynamics

Parent market analysis, market growth inducers and obstacles, fast-growing and slow-growing segment analysis, COVID-19 impact and recovery analysis and future consumer dynamics, and market condition analysis for the forecast period

Customization purview

If our report has not included the data that you are looking for, you can reach out to our analysts and get segments customized.

Browse for Technavio utilities market reports

Table of contents

1. Executive Summary 

  1.1 Market Overview 

  Exhibit 01:  Key Finding 1

  Exhibit 02:  Key Finding 2

  Exhibit 03:  Key Finding 5

  Exhibit 04:  Key Finding 6

  Exhibit 05:  Key Finding 7

2. Market Landscape 

  2.1 Market ecosystem 

  Exhibit 06:  Parent market

  Exhibit 07:  Market characteristics

  2.2 Value chain analysis 

  Exhibit 08:  Value chain analysis: Renewable electricity

  2.2.1 Inputs

  2.2.2 Electricity generation

  2.2.3 Electricity transmission

  2.2.4 Electricity distribution

  2.2.5 End-users

  2.2.6 Innovations

3. Market Sizing 

  3.1 Market definition

  Exhibit 09:  Offerings of vendors included in the market definition

  3.2 Market segment analysis 

  Exhibit 10:  Market segments

  3.3 Market size 2021 

  3.4 Market outlook: Forecast for 2021 - 2026 

  3.4.1 Estimating growth rates for emerging and high-growth markets

  3.4.2 Estimating growth rates for mature markets

  Exhibit 11:  Global - Market size and forecast 2021 - 2026 (TWh)

  Exhibit 12:  Global market: Year-over-year growth 2021 - 2026 (%)

4. Five Forces Analysis 

  4.1 Five Forces Summary 

  Exhibit 13:  Five forces analysis 2021 & 2026

  4.2 Bargaining power of buyers 

  Exhibit 14:  Bargaining power of buyers

  4.3 Bargaining power of suppliers 

  Exhibit 15: Bargaining power of suppliers

  4.4 Threat of new entrants 

  Exhibit 16:  Threat of new entrants

  4.5 Threat of substitutes 

  Exhibit 17: Threat of substitutes

  4.6 Threat of rivalry 

  Exhibit 18: Threat of rivalry

  4.7 Market condition 

  Exhibit 19:  Market condition - Five forces 2021

5. Market Segmentation by Application 

  5.1 Market segments

  The segments covered in this chapter are:

  • Grid-connected
  • Off-grid

  Exhibit 20:  Application - Market share 2021-2026 (%)

  5.2 Comparison by Application 

  Exhibit 21:  Comparison by Application

  5.3 Grid-connected - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 

  Exhibit 22:  Grid-connected - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 (TWh)

  Exhibit 23:  Grid-connected - Year-over-year growth 2021-2026 (%)

  5.4 Off-grid - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 

  Exhibit 24:  Off-grid - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 (TWh)

  Exhibit 25:  Off-grid - Year-over-year growth 2021-2026 (%)

  5.5 Market opportunity by Application 

  Exhibit 26:  Market opportunity by Application

6. Market Segmentation by End-user 

  6.1 Market segments

  The segments covered in this chapter are:

  • Utility
  • Rooftop

  Exhibit 27:  End-user - Market share 2021-2026 (%)

  6.2 Comparison by End-user 

  Exhibit 28:  Comparison by End-user

  6.3 Utility - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 

  Exhibit 29:  Utility - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 (TWh)

  Exhibit 30:  Utility - Year-over-year growth 2021-2026 (%)

  6.4 Rooftop - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 

  Exhibit 31:  Rooftop - Market size and forecast 2021-2026 (TWh)

  Exhibit 32:  Rooftop - Year-over-year growth 2021-2026 (%)

  6.5 Market opportunity by End-user 

  Exhibit 33:  Market opportunity by End-user

7. Customer landscape 

  Technavio's customer landscape matrix comparing Drivers or price sensitivity, Adoption lifecycle, importance in customer price basket, Adoption rate and Key purchase criteria

  7.1 Overview

  Exhibit 34:  Customer landscape

8. Drivers, Challenges, and Trends 

  8.1 Market drivers 

  8.1.1 Sunny climatic conditions

  8.1.2 Rising adoption of renewable energy source

  8.1.3 Rising government initiative

  8.2 Market challenges 

  8.2.1 High initial investment and maintenance cost for solar PV systems

  ?8.2.2 Increasing number of alternative energy sources

  8.2.3 Intermittency in solar power generation

  Exhibit 35:  Impact of drivers and challenges

  8.3 Market trends 

  8.3.1 Scaling up renewables in transport

  8.3.2 Declining cost of solar PV panels 

  8.3.3 Increasing adoption of microgrids

9. Vendor Landscape 

  9.1 Overview

  Exhibit 36:  Vendor landscape

  9.2 Landscape disruption 

  Exhibit 37:  Landscape disruption

  Exhibit 38:  Industry risks

10. Vendor Analysis 

  10.1 Vendors covered 

  Exhibit 44:  Vendors covered

  10.2 Market positioning of vendors 

  Exhibit 45: Market positioning of vendors

  10.3 ARTsolar Pty Ltd. 

  Exhibit 41:  ARTsolar Pty Ltd. - Overview

  Exhibit 42:  ARTsolar Pty Ltd. - Product and service

  Exhibit 43:  ARTsolar Pty Ltd. - Key offerings

  10.4 Canadian Solar Inc. 

  Exhibit 44:  Canadian Solar Inc. - Overview

  Exhibit 45:  Canadian Solar Inc. - Business segments

  Exhibit 46:  Canadian Solar Inc. - Key offerings

  Exhibit 47:  Canadian Solar Inc. - Segment focus

  10.5 Enel SPA

  Exhibit 48:  Enel SPA - Overview

  Exhibit 49:  Enel SPA - Business segments

  Exhibit 50:  Enel SPA - Key offerings

  10.6 ENGIE SA 

  Exhibit 51:  ENGIE SA - Overview

  Exhibit 52:  ENGIE SA - Business segments

  Exhibit 53:  ENGIE SA - Key offerings

  Exhibit 54:  ENGIE SA - Segment focus

  10.7 IBC Solar AG 

  Exhibit 55:  IBC Solar AG - Overview

  Exhibit 56:  IBC Solar AG - Product and service

  Exhibit 57:  IBC Solar AG - Key offerings

  10.8 Jiangsu Seraphim Solar System Co. Ltd. 

  Exhibit 58:  Jiangsu Seraphim Solar System Co. Ltd. - Overview

  Exhibit 59:  Jiangsu Seraphim Solar System Co. Ltd. - Business segments

  Exhibit 60:  Jiangsu Seraphim Solar System Co. Ltd. - Key offerings

  10.9 JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd. 

  Exhibit 61:  JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd. - Overview

  Exhibit 62:  JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd. - Business segments

  Exhibit 63:  JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd. - Key offerings

  10.10 Renenergy South Africa Pty Ltd. 

  Exhibit 64:  Renenergy South Africa Pty Ltd. - Overview

  Exhibit 65:  Renenergy South Africa Pty Ltd. - Product and service

  Exhibit 66:  Renenergy South Africa Pty Ltd. - Key offerings

  10.11 SunPower Corp. 

  Exhibit 67:  SunPower Corp. - Overview

  Exhibit 68:  SunPower Corp. - Business segments

  Exhibit 69:  SunPower Corp. - Key offerings

  Exhibit 70:  SunPower Corp. - Segment focus

  10.12 Trina Solar Co. Ltd. 

  Exhibit 71:  Trina Solar Co. Ltd. - Overview

  Exhibit 72:  Trina Solar Co. Ltd. - Business segments

  Exhibit 73:  Trina Solar Co. Ltd. - Key offerings

  Exhibit 74:  Trina Solar Co. Ltd. - Segment focus

11. Appendix 

  11.1 Scope of the report 

  11.1.1 Market definition

  11.1.2 Objectives

  11.1.3 Notes and caveats

  11.2 Currency conversion rates for US$ 

  Exhibit 75:  Currency conversion rates for US$

  11.3 Research Methodology 

  Exhibit 76:  Research Methodology

  Exhibit 77:  Validation techniques employed for market sizing

  Exhibit 78:  Information sources

  11.4 List of abbreviations 

  Exhibit 79:  List of abbreviations

About Us
Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. Their research and analysis focus on emerging market trends and provide actionable insights to help businesses identify market opportunities and develop effective strategies to optimize their market positions. With over 500 specialized analysts, Technavio's report library consists of more than 17,000 reports and counting, covering 800 technologies, spanning across 50 countries. Their client base consists of enterprises of all sizes, including more than 100 Fortune 500 companies. This growing client base relies on Technavio's comprehensive coverage, extensive research, and actionable market insights to identify opportunities in existing and potential markets and assess their competitive positions within changing market scenarios.

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UK: +44 203 893 3200
Email: media@technavio.com
Website: www.technavio.com/

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Metaverse investments: Opportunities and risks of the trillion-dollar VR market

What are the best metaverse projects that investors should keep on their radar? Cointelegraph Research Metaverse Ranking Awards the top projects

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What are the best metaverse projects that investors should keep on their radar? Cointelegraph Research Metaverse Ranking Awards the top projects

The metaverse continues to expand, with industry giants and upcoming players racing to seize a slice of the potentially trillion-dollar pie. Close to $2 billion was invested in blockchain-based metaverse deals in 2022, according to Cointelegraph Research’s VC database

A 2022 report by McKinsey estimated the metaverse industry to potentially generate up to $5 trillion in revenue by 2030, an estimate overtaken by Citi's forecast of $8 to $13 trillion. These estimations reflect significant growth from the global metaverse market of $65.5 billion recorded in 2022. To realize these optimistic forecasts, the metaverse industry would need to sustain an impressive 85% compound average growth rate.

VC metaverse funding in 2022. Source: Source: Cointelegraph Research.

Investors will never guess which metaverse won Cointelegraph’s 2023 Ranking of Metaverses. This blockchain-based metaverse has over $61 million in value locked in its smart contracts and over 8,000 monthly users. To learn more about the project that enables true ownership of in-game assets and has a deflationary token model, read the report now. 

Download the report on the Cointelegraph Research Terminal.

Stronger than ever

Yet, the metaverse landscape is not without its difficulties. Market cap losses have plagued industry leaders, with Meta, formerly known as Facebook, losing 77% of its market cap equivalent to $800 billion between late 2021 and 2022. As a result, Meta’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, plans to eliminate 21,000 jobs in 2023.

Despite setbacks, industry titans like Microsoft, Apple, Nvidia, and Qualcomm are all developing their metaverse strategies. Apple's entry into the metaverse is highly anticipated with its AR/VR headset launch slated for June 2023. Similarly, gaming firms like Epic and Roblox utilized the pandemic lockdown to their advantage, successfully launching metaverse concerts that reached millions worldwide.

In 2022, mergers, acquisitions, and financing in the metaverse realm rose from $13 billion in 2021 to over $120 billion, bolstered by Microsoft's $69 billion acquisition of Activision. This deal had a 7.6x EV/Sales multiple and a 20.2x EV/EBITDA multiple. Although valuation multiples are expected to decrease in line with higher interest rates, investment activities remain robust.

Metaverse marketing efforts. Source: Cointelegraph Research.

Top blockchain metaverse projects are also attracting significant capital. Leading blockchain metaverses measured by market cap include The Sandbox ($1.02 billion), Decentraland ($905 million), and Axie Infinity ($830 million). Year to date (YTD) performance of The Sandbox is 44%. Decentraland’s YTD is 62%. Neither of them surpasses Bitcoin’s YTD retu of 68%.

For investors seeking exposure to the metaverse, ETFs like the Fidelity Metaverse ETF (FMET) and Roundhill Ball Metaverse ETF (METV) offer viable options. However, the new Cointelegraph Research study reveals that a majority of token transactions in metaverse projects result from speculation rather than actual in-metaverse usage, a trend that calls for cautious investment.

The Cointelegraph Research team

Cointelegraph’s Research department comprises some of the best talents in the blockchain industry. The research team comprises subject matter experts from across the fields of finance, economics and technology to bring the premier source for industry reports and insightful analysis to the market. The team utilizes APIs from a variety of sources in order to provide accurate, useful information and analyses.

The opinions expressed in the article are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual or on any specific security or investment product.

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How a neighborhood-focused Baltimore initiative is employing patience, partnership, and resident leadership to drive long-term change

At the corner of North and Cecil Avenues in Central Baltimore sits the newly constructed home of a community-based organization, Roberta’s House, which…

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By Darius Graham

At the corner of North and Cecil Avenues in Central Baltimore sits the newly constructed home of a community-based organization, Roberta’s House, which provides mental health and grief counseling services to residents who may not otherwise get these much-needed services. The building represents a transformational investment designed to bring new life to a vacant block that was previously occupied by rowhomes.

When construction on Roberta’s House broke ground in 2018, the two sides of Cecil Avenue at this corner were divided, both physically and symbolically. The juxtaposition of abandoned rowhomes on one side and hope rising from the ground on the other side, sparked a thought among staff at Baltimore’s Weinberg Foundation: What if this building were to be the start of a ripple of redevelopment and opportunity in the neighborhood?

And so, the revitalization of this one building on this one corner would soon become part of something bigger—a philanthropic-funded effort to improve the health and life trajectory of Central Baltimore residents. This piece tells the story of lessons from the Greenmount Life, Opportunity, and Wellness (GLOW) Initiative, a new effort to concentrate financial and social investment in select neighborhoods that have long experienced underinvestment.

Developing a hyper-local strategy rooted in strength

Created in 1990, The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation had been funding Baltimore-based nonprofits for 30 years when, beginning in 2018 and following many conversations with stakeholders, the foundation adopted a hyperlocal, place-based strategy (while continuing to provide grants across the Baltimore region). The premise was that by focusing some of the foundation’s financial and social capital in a compact geographic area, it could drive positive outcomes in an even more targeted way. Out of this decision came GLOW.

We knew that one of the most important factors in getting GLOW off the ground was choosing the right area on which to focus our efforts. Several factors led to our selection of four Central Baltimore neighborhoods, Midway, Barclay, Harwood, and Greenmount West, including:

  • Need: Many residents of our target neighborhoods had limited economic opportunity and poor health. Midway, for example, had the highest unemployment rate of any neighborhood in the city, the sixth lowest life expectancy, and one of the city’s highest concentrations of children living in poverty.
  • Concurrent investment: While Baltimore City, despite decades of disinvestment, had designated the area as one of its “Impact Investment Areas,” other major developments, including a large nonprofit makerspace, were already underway or forthcoming in the area. Meanwhile, a coalition of funders had also recently launched the Central Baltimore Future Fund to catalyze commercial redevelopment. We recognized that GLOW would be more successful if it aligned with those efforts.
  • Partners: The area also is home to four public schools and many nonprofits, including Central Baltimore Partnership (CBP), a nonprofit collaborative of over 100 organizations dedicated to the revitalization of Central Baltimore neighborhoods. These partners already had meaningful relationships and capacity that if brought together could help achieve more positive outcomes for the neighborhoods around GLOW’s goals.

With all of this in mind, Weinberg Foundation saw an opportunity to improve Central Baltimore’s economic and public health outcomes by working with CBP to physically transform the four neighborhoods, while placing special emphasis on health and educational outcomes for their residents. In this way, the Foundation was able to tap into existing organizational infrastructure—essentially building from strength instead of building from scratch.

Strong and glowing: From an idea to implementation

The central purpose of GLOW is to mobilize and coordinate an array of organizations to improve the health and life trajectory of Central Baltimore residents by improving access to, and utilization of, primary health care, nutritious food, and enriching educational or career opportunities for youth. While the long-term goal is to make an impact on key indicators like unemployment and life expectancy, we know that those will take years. In the interim, we are squarely focused on supporting the initiative as a platform for aligning multiple organizations, sourcing and advancing residents’ goals and desire, lifting up residents as leaders, and attracting additional resources to the neighborhood.

We’ve had some early wins. For example, GLOW has established a network of more than 30 service providers, including a national organization it recruited to the neighborhood, which will connect 125 families with housing, employment, financial, and supportive services that help increase economic mobility. Other wins include expanding paid summer youth opportunities in the neighborhood by partnering with Banner Neighborhoods to operate a YouthWorks site, and catalyzing the development of several key capital projects including an outdoor education and community health hub along with a teaching kitchen. Along the way, we’ve also learned a lot of lessons relevant for any equity-focused place-based initiative, including:

  1. The lead organization for a place-based initiative—CBP in the case of GLOW—must be adept at navigating a range of efforts and stakeholders. Specifically, it must be capable of both strategic and tactical efforts and have trust and relationships with a range of stakeholders, including funders, government leaders, and residents. The organization must focus on strategy at all levels and not get bogged down in the day-to-day of providing services and activities in the neighborhood.
  2. Genuine partnership means more than ‘partners on paper’. Partnership, like collaboration, is a term that gets used a lot and can mean different things to different people. With GLOW, we have found that true partnership requires more than regular meetings or information sharing. It demands building trusting relationships rooted in an “if you win, I win” mentality instead of in the scarcity mindset that often pervades the nonprofit sector, especially when it comes to working with foundations. It means jointly applying for funding, being clear about expectations and roles, and navigating conflict.
  3. Community leadership is as important as community engagement. For place-based initiatives like GLOW, it’s critical that residents not just be engaged in typical ways like surveys or public meetings. Instead, residents should have genuine leadership and decision-making authority— meaning equal or greater representation on the committee overseeing the initiative, with compensation for their time and insights.
  4. Planning takes time and resources. Place-based initiatives require coordinating across city agencies, nonprofit organizations, and resident leaders—as well as including visible wins in early months to build trust and buy-in with residents and partners. This took us two years and required flexibility as the COVID-19 pandemic extended timelines and shifted our attention. Even under normal circumstances planning requires significant staff time to thoughtfully engage residents and stakeholders in small group and one-on-one conversations.
  5. Patience is essential. Place-based initiatives require a long-term commitment due to the nature of developing the infrastructure across sectors to create systemic, long-term change. Phases include understanding the challenges and opportunities in the community, building the infrastructure across multiple partners, and capacity building for anchor institutions—all before achieving neighborhood-level outcomes.

With these lessons in mind, we are continuing to invest in and build GLOW so it can serve as a platform for convening resident and stakeholders to drive change in Central Baltimore for many years to come. By focusing on strategy, building true partnerships, centering residents as leaders, investing in planning, and operating with a sense of flexibility and patience, we believe other funders and community-based organizations can build similar initiatives to help transform underinvested neighborhoods.

Photo credit: Banner Neighborhoods, Inc.

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Insilico Medicine Founder and CEO Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD presents at Jefferies Global Healthcare Conference

Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, founder and CEO of Insilico Medicine (“Insilico”), a generative artificial intelligence (AI)-driven drug discovery company,…

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Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, founder and CEO of Insilico Medicine (“Insilico”), a generative artificial intelligence (AI)-driven drug discovery company, will present on the latest company milestones at the Jefferies Global Healthcare Conference on June 8, 4:30pm ET at the Marriott Marquis in New York City. The conference brings together hundreds of public and private healthcare companies and thousands of executives, as well as institutional investors, private equity investors, and VCs discussing trends and investment opportunities in healthcare in the US.

Credit: Insilico Medicine

Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, founder and CEO of Insilico Medicine (“Insilico”), a generative artificial intelligence (AI)-driven drug discovery company, will present on the latest company milestones at the Jefferies Global Healthcare Conference on June 8, 4:30pm ET at the Marriott Marquis in New York City. The conference brings together hundreds of public and private healthcare companies and thousands of executives, as well as institutional investors, private equity investors, and VCs discussing trends and investment opportunities in healthcare in the US.

Zhavoronkov will share updates on Insilico’s rapidly progressing pipeline of novel therapeutics available for partnering and licensing, and showcase its new AI-driven fully robotic target discovery and validation platform, and end-to-end drug discovery platform, Pharma.AI, which includes target identification (PandaOmics), drug design (Chemistry42), and clinical trial outcome prediction (InClinico). The platform has produced three drugs that have reached clinical trials. Insilico’s lead drug for the devastating chronic lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), the first AI-discovered and AI-designed drug to advance to clinical trials, will soon be entering Phase 2 trials with patients. Insilico’s generative AI-designed drug for COVID-19 and related variants has been approved for clinical trials and has a number of design advantages over existing COVID-19 drugs. Most recently, the company announced that its USP1 synthetic lethality inhibitor received FDA IND approval for the treatment of solid tumors. 

There are 31 drugs in Insilico’s pipeline available for partnering and licensing for indications including cancer, fibrosis, and central nervous system diseases, and the Company has nominated 12 preclinical candidates in the past two years, most recently a potentially best-in-class preclinical candidate targeting ENPP1 for cancer immunotherapy and the potential treatment of Hypophosphatasia (HPP).

Insilico has partnered with leading pharma companies, including Fosun Pharma and Sanofi, to accelerate their programs. The Company has raised over $400m in funding to date from notable biotech and tech investors.

 

About Insilico Medicine

Insilico Medicine, a clinical-stage end-to-end artificial intelligence (AI)-driven drug discovery company, connects biology, chemistry, and clinical trials analysis using next-generation AI systems. The company has developed AI platforms that utilize deep generative models, reinforcement learning, transformers, and other modern machine learning techniques to discover novel targets and design novel molecular structures with desired properties. Insilico Medicine is delivering breakthrough solutions to discover and develop innovative drugs for cancer, fibrosis, immunity, central nervous system (CNS) diseases, and aging-related diseases.

For more information, visit www.insilico.com

 


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