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Canadian government grants your business might qualify for

  With the changes in the economy, many business owners are struggling to get a foothold on what they need to do to ensure their business is stable now and into the future. As a business coach, I’ve seen some tremendous transformations when businesses…

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With the changes in the economy, many business owners are struggling to get a foothold on what they need to do to ensure their business is stable now and into the future.

As a business coach, I’ve seen some tremendous transformations when businesses have had the opportunity to hire outside help to guide them towards increased profitability and less stress.

To support businesses, our team has come up with 24 grants that your business might qualify for in helping you take it to the next level.

FEDERAL GRANTS

Canada Job GrantThe Canada Job Grant (CJG) is a federal government funding program designed to reduce the costs of providing third-party skills training to new and existing employees. Launched in 2014, the Canada Job Grant allocates upwards of $194 million annually to support the upskilling of new and existing employees so they can learn new skills and become more valuable to their organizations.

Canada Small Business Financing ProgramThis is part of the Canada Small Business Financing Act and was created to help support business growth through business loans with competitive interest rates. Up to $1-million is available for business expansion activities, including the acquisition of a building, leasehold improvements, purchasing new or used equipment, and software components.

Strategic Innovation FundThe SIF is a federal government program uniquely targeted at Canada’s industrial and technology sectors. It offers financial contributions (both repayable and non-repayable) valued at up to 50 per cent of project costs, with the purpose of promoting investment into the types of activities that drive sustained productivity and economic benefits.

BRITISH COLUMBIA BUSINESS GRANTS

Canada-B.C. Job GrantThe B.C. Employer Training Grant program (ETG) supports skills training to address provincial labour market shortages. Reimbursement amounts vary between 60 and 100 per cent, depending on the training stream. Employers are eligible to receive up to $300,000 per fiscal year (April 1 to March 31).

Foundational Training Stream (government of Canada through the Canada-B.C. workforce development agreement): This stream supports unemployed and low-skilled British Columbians to gain essential, transferable and certified skills, in order to obtain good-paying jobs and increase job security. Under the Foundational Training Stream, employers may receive 100 per cent of eligible training costs, up to a maximum of $10,000 per participant per fiscal year.

Workforce Training stream (government of Canada through the Canada-B.C. workforce development agreement): This stream supports training relevant to the immediate needs of the business and the participant’s job. Under the Workforce Training Stream, employers may receive 60 per cent of eligible training costs, up to a maximum of $5,000 per participant per fiscal year.

Technical Training StreamThis stream supports employers to train current or new employees in technical skills in response to technological advancements. Under the Technical Training Stream, employers may receive 80 per cent of eligible training costs, up to a maximum of $10,000 per participant per fiscal year.

BUSINESS GRANTS NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA

 Competitive consulting grantThe Competitiveness Consulting Rebate program provides a rebate to small and medium-sized businesses engaged in manufacturing, innovative technologies, resource processing, transportation, distribution and their first-line suppliers for external business consulting projects. Projects must focus on increased productivity, new or incremental revenues, profitability and/or job creation.

COVID-19 Recovery ProgramThis program is designed to help businesses reduce the barrier to accessing professional expertise and recover the costs of third-party consulting projects. These types of projects must focus on ways to sustain businesses during the current economic downturn. The Small Business Recovery Consulting Rebate will reimburse small and medium sized businesses (operators) for contracted consulting services.

Northern Industries Innovation FundThe NIIF program provides incremental funding to support innovation projects that increase the competitiveness of local businesses in traditional industries across northern B.C. The program is also intended to support economic diversification and/or viability of businesses to mitigate the economic impact of the pine beetle epidemic. NIIF supports applied research and development, new or improved products and services, and testing of innovative equipment or technologies to support capital investment decisions

Marketing InitiativesThe Marketing Initiatives program provides funding to support new marketing campaigns or projects that position a community or region to take advantage of opportunities that support economic vitality and diversification. These marketing projects must be new initiatives that stand alone from existing marketing activities.

GRANTS FOR WAGE SUBSIDIES

Industrial Research Assistance Program Youth Employment ProgramThis federal program helps your business create business or technology jobs for highly-skilled youth. It will pay a part of wage-related costs so you can hire young talent to work on innovation-related projects.

Venture for Canada partner opportunitiesFrom short-term support to full-time hires, this program offers a wide of programs at various costs commitment levels. It provides students and recent grads with the entrepreneurial skills today’s Canadian startups and SMEs need.

Career Ready Program – TECHNATIONFor employers within the technology sector (or related projects).

Innovate B.C. – Tech Co-op GrantsGet up to $20,000 per year in funding to hire co-op students through the Tech Co-op Grant, which is available for technology-based companies looking to grow or a non-tech company, organization or non-profit hiring for a tech role.

New Ventures B.C. – Innovator Skills Initiative GrantGet up to $10,000 per year in funding to hire students through WIL programs (not including co-op), such as internships and work placements. Eligible employers are tech companies or tech-focused non-profits hiring for a business or tech role, or a business or non-profit hiring for a tech role.

Mitacs AccelerateMitacs Accelerate pairs businesses with masters and PhD interns to overcome innovation challenges. Interns complete research and develop tools, models, technology, or solutions to support the host business’ challenges.

GRANTS FOR RESEARCH

IRAP accelerated review process (ARP): The Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) offers Canadian small business grants for any company committed to internal research and development. One such program is called IRAP Accelerated Review Process (ARP), which covers as much as $50,000 towards a wide array of different projects so long as they are aimed at solving an internal technical challenge.

GRANTS FOR INDIGENOUS ENTREPRENEURS

Economic development fundParticipating First Nations can access this economic development fund that supports environmentally sound and sustainable economic development activities throughout the Great Bear Rainforest and Haida Gwaii.

Aboriginal Entrepreneurship ProgramThe Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Program (AEP) seeks to increase the number of viable businesses in Canada owned and controlled by Indigenous people. The AEP funds a broad range of entrepreneurial pursuits and aims to build capacity, reduce barriers and increase access to capital, by forging partnerships that will increase economic opportunities for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people.

Money for Indigenous Tourism Businesses in Northern Canada: If you’re working on a project to enhance tourism experiences in your region or helping the community attract more visitors, you could get a maximum $100,000 non-repayable contribution for up to 50 per cent of your project’s costs or a maximum $500,000 repayable contribution for up to 75 per cent of the costs. If you’re also a non-profit, the contribution is most likely non-repayable.

More advice for your business community

OTHER GRANTS

Canada-Alberta Job Grant (CAJG): The Canada-Alberta Job Grant (CAJG) is an Alberta government funding program that offers training grants to employers. Through the program, companies may receive non-repayable funding from the government to purchase third-party business training programs, including training for in-demand skillsets. Training is expected to improve the employability and value employees can provide; including new hires in these training sessions can also maximize your funding potential.

The Canada-Ontario Job Grant (COJG): The COJG is an Ontario government funding program that offers training grants to employers. Through the program, companies may receive non-repayable funding from the government to purchase third-party business training programs, including training for in-demand skillsets. Training is expected to improve the employability and value employees can provide; including new hires in these training sessions can also maximize your funding potential.

By Dave Fuller

Dave Fuller, MBA, is an award-winning business coach and a partner with Pivotleader Inc. Did we miss something? Email dave@pivotleader.com. 

Courtesy of Troy Media.

 

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Biden Suffers Worst Approval Ratings Plunge Of Any President Since World War II 

Biden Suffers Worst Approval Ratings Plunge Of Any President Since World War II 

President Biden’s job approval rating has fallen the most since the start of his term than any other president since World War II. 

A new Gallup poll was…

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Biden Suffers Worst Approval Ratings Plunge Of Any President Since World War II 

President Biden's job approval rating has fallen the most since the start of his term than any other president since World War II. 

A new Gallup poll was released Friday, polling Americans between Oct. 1-19 shows Biden's approval rating plunged from 56% in Q1 to 44.7% in Q3, a whopping 11.3 percentage points that any president hasn't seen in over 75 years. 

"Biden began his term with relatively solid approval ratings, ranging between 54% and 57% from January through June. His approval dropped to 50% in July and 49% in August as coronavirus infections surged in the U.S. The chaotic U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in late August, which included the deaths of more than a dozen U.S. military personnel in a terrorist attack at the Kabul airport, was likely the reason Biden's September job approval rating fell further to 43%," Gallup said. 

We noted in June that Gallup data showed Biden's "honeymoon period" was over and said if the president cannot "tame inflation" could result in further rating declines. And, oh boy, were we right...

Biden also faces an increasing disillusionment among Americans that he can't fix the border crisis, snarled supply chains, high gas prices, soaring inflation, consumer goods shortages, and the coronavirus pandemic, among a whole list of other things. 

His ratings suggest no improvement in Democrat support, declining support among Independents, and only 4% of Republicans polled approve of the job he's done - that figure is likely to go to zero if things don't turn around for the president. 

The 88% partisan gap in job approval is extraordinarily high considering Biden campaigned on "unity." During his inauguration, he said: 

"We can join forces, stop the shouting and lower the temperature. For without unity there is no peace, only bitterness and fury. No progress, only exhausting outrage. No nation, only a state of chaos. This is our historic moment of crisis and challenge, and unity is the path forward."

While Democrats are desperately trying to salvage their $3.5 trillion Build Back Better infrastructure plan, Americans are increasingly becoming confused about what exactly that means and how that will affect them. Repbulicans have requested the president to fix broken supply chain before more social spending. 

Souring support suggests Democrats could be on track to lose big in next year's midterms. 

Tyler Durden Sat, 10/23/2021 - 14:00

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Government

Fauci Funded ‘Cruel’ Puppy Experiments Where Sand Flies ‘Eat Them Alive’; Vocal Cords Severed

Fauci Funded ‘Cruel’ Puppy Experiments Where Sand Flies ‘Eat Them Alive’; Vocal Cords Severed

While recent attention has been focused on Dr. Anthony Fauci’s National Institutes of Health funding the genetic manipulation of bat coronaviruses..

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Fauci Funded 'Cruel' Puppy Experiments Where Sand Flies 'Eat Them Alive'; Vocal Cords Severed

While recent attention has been focused on Dr. Anthony Fauci's National Institutes of Health funding the genetic manipulation of bat coronaviruses in the same town as the bat coronavirus pandemic emerged, a bipartisan group of lawmakers have demanded answers over 'sick' experiments on drugged puppies, according to The Hill.

"Our investigators show that Fauci’s NIH division shipped part of a $375,800 grant to a lab in Tunisia to drug beagles and lock their heads in mesh cages filled with hungry sand flies so that the insects could eat them alive," writes nonprofit organization the White Coat Waste Project. "They also locked beagles alone in cages in the desert overnight for nine consecutive nights to use them as bait to attract infectious sand flies."

As The Hill's Christian Spencer writes:

The White Coat Waste Project, the nonprofit organization that first pointed out that U.S. taxpayers were being used to fund the controversial Wuhan Institute of Virology, have now turned its sights on Anthony Fauci on another animal-testing-related matter — infecting dozens of beagles with disease-causing parasites to test an experimental drug on them.

House members, most of whom are Republicans, want Fauci to explain himself in response to allegations brought on by the White Coat Waste Project that involve drugging puppies.

According to the White Coat Waste Project, the Food and Drug Administration does not require drugs to be tested on dogs, so the group is asking why the need for such testing. 

White Coat Waste claims that 44 beagle puppies were used in a Tunisia, North Africa, laboratory, and some of the dogs had their vocal cords removed, allegedly so scientists could work without incessant barking. -The Hill

The concerned lawmakers are led by Rep. Nancy Mace (R-SC), who said in a letter to the NIH that cordectomies are "cruel" and a "reprehensible misuse of taxpayer funds." Mace is joined by reps Cindy Axne (D-Iowa), Cliff Bentz (R-Ore.), Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.), Rick Crawford (R-Ark.), Brian Fitzpatrick (R-Pa.), Scott Franklin (R-Fla.), Andrew Garbarino (R-N.Y.), Carlos Gimenez (R-Fla.), Jimmy Gomez (D-Calif.), Josh Gottheimer (D-N.J.), Fred Keller (R-Pa.), Ted Lieu (D-Calif.), Lisa McClain (R-Mich.), Nicole Malliotakis (R-N.Y.), Brian Mast (R-Fla.), Scott Perry (R-Pa.), Bill Posey (R-Fla.), Mike Quigley (D-Ill.), Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.), Maria E. Salazar (R-Fla.), Terri Sewell (D-Ala.), Daniel Webster (R-Fla.) and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.) via The Hill.

How will Fauci spin this?

Tyler Durden Sat, 10/23/2021 - 15:00

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COVID-19 pandemic shifted patient attitudes about colorectal cancer screening

Key takeaways Credit: American College of Surgeons Key takeaways A survey of adults eligible for colorectal cancer screening patterns found a preference for at-home fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) versus colonoscopy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey.

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Key takeaways

Credit: American College of Surgeons

Key takeaways

  • A survey of adults eligible for colorectal cancer screening patterns found a preference for at-home fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) versus colonoscopy during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Survey respondents reported less use of colonoscopy during the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic levels, with factors related to both COVID-19 infection concerns and the financial strain of having copays.
  • FOBT shows potential as an alternative to screening colonoscopy to improve access to colorectal cancer screening in the context of COVID-19 safety and economic concerns.

CHICAGO: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients’ willingness to keep appointments for non-COVID-19 illnesses has been well documented, but a team of researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University report that for people hesitant to come into the hospital or an outpatient center to get a colonoscopy, home-administered fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) may provide a useful workaround tool. About 30 percent more survey respondents completed home-based test during the pandemic than before.

Kristine Kenning, MD, MS, presented findings from a survey of adults age-eligible for screening at the virtual American College of Surgeons (ACS) Clinical Congress 2021. “The key message from our findings is that barriers to screening have increased during the pandemic, and we have to find a way to work with the community to increase those rates,” said Dr. Kenning, chief general surgery resident at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Medicine, Richmond. “Our study found that people are compliant with, and willing to do, home-based fecal occult blood testing. This test provides a very important way for us to increase screening for colorectal cancer.”

The American College of Gastroenterology clinical guidelines recommend colonoscopy for colorectal cancer evaluation and following a positive FOBT with a colonoscopy.1 About 148,000 cases of colorectal cancers are newly diagnosed in the United States each year, the American Cancer Society reports, and they account for 53,000 deaths.2

About the survey

The cross-sectional survey involved 765 people age 50 years and older. Dr. Kenning and colleagues found that their respondents reported a higher completion of stool tests pre-COVID than the American Cancer Society reported,2 32 percent vs. 11 percent. During the pandemic, 50 percent of respondents said they completed the FOBT. By contrast, 44 percent of survey respondents who said they had colon screening during the pandemic underwent a colonoscopy. This practice appears to demonstrate substitution of stool-based testing for colonoscopy, Dr. Kenning noted. 

“Our study looked at attitudes toward colorectal cancer screening and how they were impacted during the pandemic, both related to concerns about the pandemic as well as to economic impacts,” senior author Emily B. Rivet, MD, MBA, FACS, said. “What we learned is that fecal occult blood testing was seen by patients as a viable alternative to conventional screening colonoscopy.” Dr. Rivet is an associate professor in the department of surgery, division of colorectal surgery, and an affiliated professor of internal medicine at VCU School of Medicine.

Patient concerns about copays

Notably, a greater percentage of respondents indicated being unemployed during the pandemic than the year prior: 7.4 vs. 2.6 percent. In addition, 41 percent of respondents expressed concerns about copays; 57.6 percent of those respondents said this was a factor for delaying screening. Dr. Kenning noted that she is working with Carrie Miller, PhD, MPH, the principal investigator of the larger survey, on a follow-up assessment of the pandemic-related impact on attitudes toward colorectal cancer screening. Dr. Miller is post-doctoral fellow with VCU’s department of health behavior and policy.

Other screening delays

Copays were not the only deterrent to getting scheduled colorectal screenings during the pandemic, the study found. Almost two-thirds of respondents—65.9 percent—confirmed concerns about COVID-19 exposure when scheduling colonoscopies; and 59 percent of them said this caused them to delay their screening. 

To address those concerns, respondents endorsed that being offered protective equipment (gloves and masks), visits to smaller offices, or weekend screening appointments would increase their likelihood of following through with the colonoscopy; respectively, 30.7 percent for each of the two former factors and 19.7 percent for weekend screening. However, 48.1 percent of respondents said they were willing to do an at-home FOBT as an alternative to colonoscopy, among whom 93 percent indicated they would be willing to undergo a follow-up colonoscopy if the FOBT was positive. 

Lessons learned from the pandemic

“Even pre-pandemic, the rates for colorectal screening in the United States were very far from 100 percent, so I think the lessons that we are learning from this pandemic and working with patients to find alternatives to what the conventional approaches have been in the past are going to be applicable to care moving forward. This approach applies even if we do eventually enter a post-pandemic state, which is, of course, what we are all hoping for,” Dr. Rivet said.

Dr. Kenning said the survey results show that there is still much work to do to improve colorectal screening. “Colorectal cancer screening has decreased significantly during the pandemic and still hasn’t improved to the rate that it was before,” Dr. Kenning said. “Making sure that we’re offering all of the options to patients is very important so that, whatever form of screening they’re comfortable with, they’ll start down that pathway in order to get the screening they need.”

The survey results also underscore the need to tailor colorectal cancer screening to each patient’s concerns and needs, Dr. Rivet said. “It’s important to have a conversation about all of these different alternatives and what the different positives and negatives are,” she said.

Study coauthors are Dr. Miller and Bernard F. Fuemmeler, PhD, MPH, also with the department of health behavior and policy at VCU; and Jaime L. Bohl, MD, FACS, with the department of surgery at VCU.

“FACS” designates that a surgeon is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.

The study authors have no relevant financial relationships to disclose. The survey was funded as part of a larger survey led by Dr. Miller on colorectal cancer and funded, in part, through support of an institutional training grant awarded by the National Cancer Institute (T32CA093423).

Citation: Kenning K. et al, COVID-19 Pandemic Impact on Colorectal Cancer Screening. Scientific Forum Presentation. American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress 2021.

______________ 

  1. Shaukat A, Kahi C, Burke CA, Rabeneck L, Sauer BG, Rex DK. ACG Clinical Guidelines: Colorectal Cancer Screening 2021. Amerc J Gastroenterol. 2021;116(3):458-479. doi: 10.14309/ajg.0000000000001122
  2. American Cancer Society. Colorectal Cancer Facts & Figures 2020-2022. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2020:22. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/content/dam/cancer-org/research/cancer-facts-and-statistics/colorectal-cancer-facts-and-figures/colorectal-cancer-facts-and-figures-2020-2022.pdf 

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About the American College of Surgeons
The American College of Surgeons is a scientific and educational organization of surgeons that was founded in 1913 to raise the standards of surgical practice and improve the quality of care for all surgical patients. The College is dedicated to the ethical and competent practice of surgery. Its achievements have significantly influenced the course of scientific surgery in America and have established it as an important advocate for all surgical patients. The College has more than 84,000 members and is the largest organization of surgeons in the world. For more information, visit www.facs.org.


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