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What Stocks To Buy Today? 3 Streaming Stocks To Watch

Could it be prime time for investors to tune in to these streaming stocks?
The post What Stocks To Buy Today? 3 Streaming Stocks To Watch appeared first on Stock Market News, Quotes, Charts and Financial Information | StockMarket.com.

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Are These The Best Streaming Stocks To Invest In Right Now?

Among the cyclical stocks that surged during the onset of the pandemic are streaming stocks. Nevertheless, with some of the recent correction, investors may be relooking at this section of the stock market today. For the most part, this would be thanks to a combination of factors potentially fueling growth in the sector. On one hand, you have the ongoing shift from cable TV to streaming services. This would be due to streaming services bringing more curated and cheaper packages compared to conventional TV offerings. On the other hand, as the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage worldwide, consumers would stream content more.

After considering all of this amidst the current volatility in the stock market, some investors could see an opportunity. For one thing, streaming companies continue to make strategic moves as well. We could look at the likes of Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) and Roku (NASDAQ: ROKU) for instance. Firstly, Netflix is now raising its prices in the U.S. and Canada across the board. The price increase is to ensure that it can continue to offer “quality entertainment options” for its subscribers. According to the company, Netflix customers will receive a 30 days notice before the price increase takes place. Given that it reportedly spent a whopping $17 billion on content last year, this push makes sense.

Secondly, Roku recently refreshed the user interface on its core streaming platform. Now, Roku watchers will find it easier to locate live content with the new Live TV Zone. Among other things, this feature serves to put Roku’s live offerings front and center. The likes of which also include Alphabet’s (NASDAQ: GOOGL) YouTube TV among other third-party services. As things continue to heat up in the streaming world, could one of these streaming stocks be top picks?

Top Streaming Stocks To Buy [Or Sell] This Week

FuboTV

To begin with, we will be taking a look at FuboTV. For those uninitiated, Fubo is a leading streaming firm that focuses on delivering sports-first live TV experiences. In other words, the company primarily caters to sports fans in the current cable-cutting trends. Some of which are still relying on bulky cable TV packages with countless irrelevant channels to get their sports content fix. To date, Fubo currently offers over 100 live sports, news, and entertainment networks on its platform.

Not to mention, the company is also actively working on its gaming division, Fubo Gaming. Fubo is doing so via its next-generation mobile sportsbook solution, the Fubo Sportsbook. This alongside Fubo’s plans to integrate interactive elements into its core streaming services, sets the company aside from its peers. Despite all of this, FUBO stock is currently on the decline amidst the current uncertainty in markets. Even so, would investors be wise to buy on the current dips in the company’s shares?

If anything, Fubo is not sitting idly amidst all of this. Just last week, the company made two notable announcements. For starters, Fubo’s estimates for its fourth-quarter earnings figures are in. The company expects a year-over-year quarterly revenue spike of 105% to 109%. In terms of full-year revenue, Fubo is forecasting a surge of between 138% to 140% over the same period. That’s not all, Fubo also now has the exclusive rights to stream the Premier League in Canada for the next three seasons. Seeing as it is the top soccer league in England, this would be a win for Fubo. With all this in mind, will you be adding FUBO stock to your portfolio anytime soon?

FUBO stock chart
Source: TD Ameritrade TOS

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Walt Disney

Another name to consider among streaming stocks now would be the Walt Disney.. In general, most consumers and investors alike would be familiar with this titan in the global entertainment scene. Whether it is timeless classics, household brands, or massive IPs, Disney brings plenty to the table. As it stands, DIS stock is still holding up in the past month despite the recent sell-off in stocks.

Overall, the current movement in DIS stock is not all that surprising. After all, its core tourism-related offerings were hit hard at the initial onslaught of the pandemic. In response to this, Disney pivoted hard towards building its highly successful Disney+ streaming platform. Fast forward to the current day and investors are understandably concerned about resurging coronavirus cases impacting Disney’s reopening operations again. Despite all of this, the company continues to press forward on the operational front. In fact, its latest Pixar animated movie Encanto is turning heads both in the music and video streaming spaces. This is evident as its arrival on Disney+ also comes with the film’s soundtrack becoming the top album on the U.S. Billboard 200 list over the weekend.

On top of all that, Disney CEO Bob Chapek recently revealed the company’s current plans. According to Chapek, the key focus of Disney now is the integration of all its content production operations into one segment. This ranges from movies, TV shows, and live sports to the company’s distribution operations. Aside from that, the only other segment would ideally be its in-person entertainment offerings such as Disney’s theme parks and cruises. In essence, Chapek says, “This reorganization leads us to have the creative people focusing on what they do best.” Given all of this, would DIS stock be a top buy for you?

DIS stock chart
Source: TD Ameritrade TOS

[Read More] Best Meme Stocks To Buy Today? 3 To Watch

Spotify

Following that, we have Spotify. All in all, the company is mostly known for its audio streaming services. By Spotify’s estimates, it currently serves a community of over 381 million monthly active users. Over 45% of them consist of premium subscribers. For a sense of scale, the company operates in 184 markets across the globe. Through its leading audio content library, Spotify users have access to over 70 million songs and podcasts titles.

Now, with SPOT stock trading well above its pre-pandemic levels, investors may be wondering if it still has room to run. While that remains to be seen, Spotify does not seem to be slowing down anytime soon. Just last month, the company acquired Whooshkaa, a podcast tech firm. In detail, the Australian firm is a one-stop platform for hosting, managing, distributing, monetizing, and promoting podcasts.

Commenting on the acquisition is Spotify Chief Content & Advertising Business Officer, Dawn Ostroff. Ostroff notes, “With Whooshkaa, we will strengthen our efforts to help audio publishers of all kinds grow their podcast business and scale our ability to help advertisers reach their audiences.” With Spotify venturing deeper into emerging digital audio markets, I could see investors eyeing SPOT stock in the long run.

SPOT stock chart
Source: TD Ameritrade TOS

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Economics

What Do Consumers Think Will Happen to Inflation?

This post provides an update on two earlier blog posts (here and here) in which we discuss how consumers’ views about future inflation have evolved in…

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This post provides an update on two earlier blog posts (here and here) in which we discuss how consumers’ views about future inflation have evolved in a continually changing economic environment. Using data from the New York Fed’s Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE), we show that while short-term inflation expectations have continued to trend upward, medium-term inflation expectations appear to have reached a plateau over the past few months, and longer-term inflation expectations have remained remarkably stable. Not surprisingly given recent movements in consumer prices, we find that most respondents agree that inflation will remain high over the next year. In contrast, and somewhat surprisingly, there is a divergence in consumers’ medium-term inflation expectations, in the sense that we observe a simultaneous increase in both the share of respondents who expect high inflation and the share of respondents who expect low inflation (and even deflation) three years from now. Finally, we show that individual consumers have become more uncertain about what inflation will be in the near future. However, in contrast to the pre-pandemic period, they tend to express less uncertainty about inflation further in the future.

The SCE is a monthly, internet-based survey produced by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York since June 2013. It is a twelve-month rotating panel (respondents are asked to take the survey for twelve consecutive months) of roughly 1,300 nationally representative U.S. household heads. Since the inception of the SCE, we have been eliciting consumers’ inflation expectations at the short- and medium-term horizons on a monthly basis. The short-term horizon corresponds to the year-ahead (with the survey question phrased as “over the next 12 months”), while the medium-term horizon corresponds to the three-year-ahead one-year rate of inflation (“0ver the 12-month period between M+24 and M+36,” where M is the month in which the respondent takes the survey). So, for instance, a respondent taking the survey in April 2022 is asked about inflation “over the 12-month period between April 2024 and April 2025.” Recently, we have on occasion elicited longer-term inflation expectations, by asking respondents to report their expected five-year-ahead one-year rate of inflation (“over the 12-month period between M+48 and M+60”). For each horizon, SCE respondents are asked to report their density forecasts by stating the percent chance that the rate of inflation will fall within pre-specified bins. These density forecasts are used to calculate the two measures that we focus on in this blog: the individual inflation expectation (the mean of a respondent’s density forecast), and the individual inflation uncertainty (measured as the interquartile range of a respondent’s density forecast).

The Median Consumer Expects Inflation to Fade over the Next Few Years

SCE respondents think the current high inflation environment will not fade over the next twelve months, but that it will taper off in the next three years and not persist beyond that. The chart below shows the monthly median individual inflation expectation at each horizon since January 2020. As can be seen here, inflation expectations in January 2020 were similar to the average readings during 2018-19 and are therefore representative of the period directly before the COVID-19 pandemic. Short- and medium-term inflation expectations increased slightly and at a similar pace during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the spring of 2021, as readings of actual inflation started to surge, short-term and, to a lesser extent, medium-term inflation expectations started to increase at a faster rate, reaching levels not seen previously in the nearly ten years since the inception of the SCE. Note that, unlike one-year-ahead inflation expectations which are still on an increasing trajectory, three-year-ahead inflation expectations have leveled off in recent months and even started decreasing slightly after reaching a peak of 4.2 percent in September and October 2021. Looking now at the few data points we have for the longer horizon, five-year-ahead inflation expectations have been remarkably stable in recent months and substantially lower than short- and medium-term inflation expectations.

Inflation Expectations at the Longer Horizon Are Stable and Much Lower

Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations.

Consumers’ Medium-Term Inflation Expectations Have Become More Divergent

At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, respondents disagreed about what impact the pandemic would have on short-term inflation, but most of them now believe inflation will be high over the next year. The chart below shows the distribution of individual inflation expectations across respondents in a given month. The left panel shows the share of respondents with low inflation expectations in a given month (that is, with an individual inflation expectation below 0 percent, which corresponds to deflation). The right panel shows the share of respondents with high inflation expectations (that is, with an individual inflation expectation above 4 percent). Starting with the short-term horizon, the chart shows that at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the spring of 2020, there was a sharp increase in the share of respondents who expected deflation (left panel) and, simultaneously, an increase in the share of respondents who expected high inflation (right panel). Hence, consumers’ short-term inflation expectations became more divergent at the onset of the pandemic, with some consumers expecting COVID-19 to be an inflationary supply shock over the subsequent twelve months, and other consumers expecting COVID-19 to be a large deflationary demand shock. Starting in the second half of 2020, the share of respondents with low short-term expectations declined, while the share of the respondents with high short-term expectations continued to increase, consistent with the overall increase in short-term inflation expectations discussed in the previous paragraph.

The divergence in inflation beliefs we observed for short-term expectations at the onset of the pandemic has shifted to medium-term expectations during the past eight months. The chart below shows little change in the share of respondents with extreme (high or low) medium-term inflation beliefs at the onset of the pandemic. This suggests that consumers initially thought the pandemic would not have a strong persistent effect on inflation. After the fall of 2020, the share of respondents who expect high inflation in the medium-term started to increase steadily (see right panel). However, the rate of increase over the past year was slower than at the short-term horizon. Furthermore, after reaching a plateau last fall, the share of respondents who expect high inflation has declined slightly in the past few months. Perhaps more surprisingly, the left panel of the chart below shows that the share of respondents who expect deflation in the medium-term started to increase sharply in the fall of last year, moving from about 10 percent in August 2020 to nearly 20 percent in March and April 2022.

Although we caution against drawing strong conclusions from only a few data points, it seems that the distribution of longer-term inflation expectations has shifted to the left (toward lower inflation outcomes) in recent months. The chart below indicates that the recent increase in the share of respondents with low inflation expectations is similar at the medium- and longer-term horizons. In contrast, the share of respondents who expect high inflation five years from now is substantially lower than at the short- and medium-term horizons and it has remained mostly stable over the past eight months.

The Distribution of Longer-Term Inflation Expectations Has Shifted toward Lower Inflation Outcomes

Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations.
Note: An inflation expectation below 0 percent (as in the left panel) corresponds to deflation.

Individual Consumers Have Become More Uncertain about Future Inflation

Finally, we find that consumers have become more uncertain about future inflation, especially at shorter horizons. The final chart shows the median of individual inflation uncertainty across respondents in a given month. As can be seen in this staff study, inflation uncertainty exhibited two main patterns prior to the pandemic. First, inflation uncertainty at both the short- and medium-term horizons had been declining slowly and steadily since the start of the SCE in 2013. Second, SCE respondents almost always expressed more uncertainty for three-year-ahead inflation than for one-year-ahead inflation, perhaps reflecting the fact that predicting inflation further into the future tends to be more difficult. The chart below shows a complete reversal of these two trends after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a pandemic in March 2020: inflation uncertainty at both horizons has since increased steadily to record levels, and short-term inflation uncertainty has generally been higher than medium-term inflation uncertainty. The few observations we have for longer-term inflation uncertainty seem to confirm these trends. Indeed, five-year-ahead inflation uncertainty has increased over the past eight months, but has remained substantially lower than at the one- and three-year horizons.

Inflation Uncertainty Is Lower at a Longer-Term Horizon

Chart: Inflation Uncertainty Is Lower at a Longer-Term Horizon
Source: Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE).
Note: The SCE measures disagreement across respondents as the difference between the 75th and 25th percentile of inflation expectations.

To conclude, the results presented in this blog post provide fresh evidence that consumers still do not expect the current spell of high inflation to persist long into the future. While median one-year-ahead inflation expectations have continued to rise over the past six months, three-year-ahead expectations have declined slightly, and five-year-ahead inflation expectations have remained remarkably stable and at a level well below recent inflation readings. However, there is now a divergence in consumers’ medium-term inflation expectations: a larger share of consumers expects high inflation three years from now, while simultaneously a growing share of consumers expects low inflation and even deflation. Finally, we have shown that consumers have become increasingly uncertain about future inflation, especially at shorter horizons. We are now conducting new research aimed at better understanding the factors driving these changes in consumer beliefs.

Olivier Armantier is head of Consumer Behavior Studies in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Research and Statistics Group.

Fatima Boumahdi is a senior research analyst in the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group.

Gizem Kosar is a research economist in Consumer Behavior Studies in the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group.

Jason Somerville is a research economist in Consumer Behavior Studies in the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group.

Giorgio Topa is an economic research advisor in Labor and Product Market Studies in the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group

Wilbert van der Klaauw is an economic research advisor on Household and Public Policy in the Bank’s Research and Statistics Group.

John C. Williams is the president and chief executive officer of the Bank. 


Disclaimer
The views expressed in this post are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the authors.

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Economics

US Economy Still On Track For Moderate Rebound In Q2

Despite rising headwinds for the global economy, US output remains set to rebound in the second quarter, based on recent estimates from several sources….

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Despite rising headwinds for the global economy, US output remains set to rebound in the second quarter, based on recent estimates from several sources.

Economic growth is expected to recover with a 2.6% increase in GDP (seasonally adjusted annual rate) for the April-through-June period via the median of several Q2 nowcasts compiled by CapitalSpectator.com. The growth rate is unchanged from the previous estimate published last week and marks a robust bounce from the 1.4% contraction reported for Q1.

The projected Q2 rebound aligns with a new forecast released yesterday by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, which paints a relatively upbeat outlook for the US economy. “In CBO’s projections, the current economic expansion continues, and economic output grows rapidly over the next year. Consumer spending increases, driven by strong gains in spending on services.”

Despite the apparent resilience for the US economy, headwinds are building for global economic activity, warned the head of the World Bank on Wednesday. Speaking at a US business conference, David Malpass says it difficult to “see how we avoid a recession.” He cites several factors, including rising prices for food and fertilizer due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and a series of coronavirus lockdowns in China.

In fact, China’s leaders are increasingly worried about the country’s outlook and convened an emergency meeting yesterday to address decelerating growth. The goal, state media reports, is to promote new measures to stabilize the economy.

For the US, recent economic data suggests that recession risk for the immediate future is still low. Nonetheless, some economists are forecasting rising odds of a downturn for 2023.

“A recession is pretty likely” next year, former Federal Reserve vice chair Alan Blinder tells CNBC. “I don’t mean 89% probability, but maybe 50 to 60% probability,” he said, although any downturn will be mild, he advises.

Gus Faucher, chief economist at PNC Financial Services Group, also thinks the US will sidestep a recession this year, but the risks rise for 2023. “The likelihood of recession this year is pretty low,” he predicts, but “it gets dicier in 2023 and 2024.”


How is recession risk evolving? Monitor the outlook with a subscription to:
The US Business Cycle Risk Report


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Economics

JA Worldwide Inducts 2022 Laureates into the Global Business Hall of Fame

JA Worldwide Inducts 2022 Laureates into the Global Business Hall of Fame
PR Newswire
BOSTON, May 26, 2022

BOSTON , May 26, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Global Business Hall of Fame, presented by JA Worldwide, features entrepreneurs and business leader…

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JA Worldwide Inducts 2022 Laureates into the Global Business Hall of Fame

PR Newswire

BOSTON , May 26, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Global Business Hall of Fame, presented by JA Worldwide, features entrepreneurs and business leaders spanning the last two centuries. From the inventor of blue jeans to the co-founder of one of the world's leading biotech companies, visitors to our digital showcase find inspiring influencers to kindle their entrepreneurial spirit.

About the Global Business Hall of Fame

The Global Business Hall of Fame is not only reflective of JA's global reach, the diversity of JA students in 115 countries, and a wide range of global industries, but also prioritizes nominees who are working toward the Global Goals for Sustainable Development (SDGs), reinforcing to young people that they have the power to be a force for global good.

In addition, nominees for new laureates are grouped into two categories:

  • Leader: An executive-level professional who inspires others, the Leader's contributions have advanced the landscape of business with a focus on improving lives. As a result, the Leader has led companies and initiatives toward the Global Goals and is a role model who exhibits social values, inclusivity, and a global point of view. The Leader is likely to have led ventures with a large scope of responsibility, resources, and talent.
  • Innovator: Under 40 years of age, entrepreneurial in spirit, and community focused, the Innovator is changing the landscape globally or has recently emerged on the global stage. The Innovator is an inspiration, full of energy, passionate about work, courageous, and a promoter of change and innovation on behalf of the global good.

Each of our new laureates joins a digital exhibit with immersive, aspirational content, redesigned this year—thanks to the support of Delta Air Lines—to look and feel like a hall-of -fame exhibition. The Global Business Hall of Fame inspires young people through laureate stories and achievements.

The Global Business Hall of Fame 2022 Laureates

We're pleased to announce our 2022 laureates:

  • Bethlehem Tilahun Alemu (Leader/Ethiopia): When Bethlehem saw skilled artisans in her community living with chronic unemployment, she built a company that would showcase their skills and provide well-paying, sustainable jobs. Today, she is founder and Executive Director of soleRebels, Africa's fastest-growing footwear company. She has approached her other startups—The Republic of Leather, Garden of Coffee, Made by Ethiopia, Selam Bank, GIZA digital, NoodFoods, and TeffTastic—with the same goal: provide employment and economic prosperity in her community, while dispelling the myth that Ethiopians and Africans don't know how to create their own prosperity.
  • Alisée De Tonnac (Innovator/Switzerland): Alisée is CEO and co-founder of Seedstars World, the largest global competition for startups in emerging and fast-growing startup ecosystems, which connects entrepreneurs with investors and grants. Alisée has managed competitions in more than 85 cities and has a physical presence in 15 strategic co-working hubs around the world. As a result, more than 40,000 entrepreneurs from emerging markets have taken part in Seedstars' events and programs, fundraising more than US$250 million and creating more than 2,500 jobs. After the outbreak of COVID-19, Alisée also launched #SeedstarsCares, an initiative that facilitates discussions and forums via webinars, podcasts, and videos about the pandemic and other important world issues.
  • Marcos Galperin (Leader/Argentina): As founder and CEO of Mercado Libre, the largest ecommerce and fintech ecosystem in Latin America, Marcos has empowered the Latin American entrepreneurial community by leveling the playing field between large companies, small businesses, and entrepreneurs. Under Marcos's leadership, Mercado Libre seeks to foster entrepreneurship through educational initiatives that encourage financial literacy and inclusion and support entrepreneurs whose projects contribute to environmental, social, and economic goals, which the company calls "triple impact entrepreneurs." Through Mercado Libre, Marcos has brought decent work and economic growth to 18 countries in the Americas, enabling more than one million families to make their livelihoods by operating in the platform.
  • Audrey Cheng (Innovator/Kenya): Audrey is co-founder, former CEO, and board member of Moringa School, a learning accelerator headquartered in Kenya that teaches skills to African youth that increase their employability potential and launch their careers. Moringa School provides digital education—including a technology bootcamp—that gives rising developers and data scientists the skills they need to enter the booming tech workforce. Today, the school also offers scholarships to low-income students and women in an effort to even the socioeconomic and gender imbalance in tech. As a natural outgrowth of the school, Audrey co-founded LendHer Capital, which funds Kenyan, female-led businesses.
  • The Global Business Hall of Fame nomination process is designed to engage diverse stakeholders from around the world and to ensure protocols are followed in the selection of laureates. To ensure fairness and transparency, the annual process involves checking performed by PwC, the Global Process Integrity Partner of the Global Business Hall of Fame. PwC oversees JA Worldwide's processes for entry evaluation, manages the committee selection of finalists, and provides a platform for the Voting Jury.

About JA Worldwide
As one of the world's largest and most-impactful youth-serving NGOs, JA Worldwide delivers hands on, immersive learning in work readiness, financial health, entrepreneurship, sustainability, STEM, economics, citizenship, ethics, and more. Reaching more than 12 million young people each year through nearly half a million teachers and business volunteers, JA Worldwide is one of few organizations with the scale, experience, and passion to build a brighter future for the next generation of innovators, entrepreneurs, and leaders. Visit us at jaworldwide.org.

Contact
Tere Stouffer
Chief Marketing Office
JA Worldwide
+1-212-641-0747
tere.stouffer@jaworldwide.org

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