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Marine Vet Sues Walmart After Pharmacist Refused To Fill His Ivermectin Prescription

Marine Vet Sues Walmart After Pharmacist Refused To Fill His Ivermectin Prescription

Authored by Debra Heine via AmGreatness.com,

Walmart is facing a new lawsuit after a pharmacist in Albert Lea, Minnesota, refused to fill a prescription…

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Marine Vet Sues Walmart After Pharmacist Refused To Fill His Ivermectin Prescription

Authored by Debra Heine via AmGreatness.com,

Walmart is facing a new lawsuit after a pharmacist in Albert Lea, Minnesota, refused to fill a prescription for ivermectin to treat a Marine vet and his wife, both of whom were suffering with COVID-19.

The Marine, Bill Salier, shared his story the “Steve Deace Show” on BlazeTV Monday.  Salier told Deace that out of desperation, he ended up purchasing the “pony paste” from the feed supply store, and they both almost immediately got better.

Salier, 53, told Deace that he began feeling sick on Oct. 1, and tested positive for COVID-19 a few days later. After his diagnosis, Salier said he attempted to receive monoclonal antibody treatments through the Minnesota Resource Allocation, but his requests were ignored.

“We never so much as heard a word back, not even in acknowledgement that the requests had been put in,” he said.

Salier said he then went to a clinic that had one monoclonal treatment, but they were saving it for a more severe case. He said he asked for ivermectin, but the clinic refused to treat him with it because the FDA has not cleared the use of the drug for treatment of COVID.

Generally, doctors in the U.S. have followed the government’s recommendations on ivermectin, and have shunned it as a treatment for COVID-19 patients.

Groups like the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance and America’s Frontline Doctors, on the other hand, have championed the Nobel-prize winning drug as an effective at treatment for COVID-19.

With Deace’s help, Salier said he found a doctor who would treat him and his wife. After a teleconference call, he said, the doctor prescribed ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine, and some other drugs for them to take. The doctor said that Salier’s case had deteriorated to the point where he would have to be hospitalized within 48 hours without a serious intervention.

Salier said his prescription was sent to his local Walmart in Albert Lea, Minnesota, but the pharmacist refused to fill it.

This pharmacist contacted my wife, telling her that he would not fill it. My wife stated that he did not have the right to stand between our physician’s prescription and the patent, he asserted that he did have that right and he refused to do so,” Salier said.

The Marine vet said that their physician later called the Walmart pharmacy to insist that the script be filled, but the pharmacist refused, and hung up on him.

“We were faced with either continuing to suffer and quite possibly ending up in the hospital where you have—I don’t know—a 50/50 chance of coming out,”  he told Deace, explaining that they were forced to turn to their local farm store, and purchase the horse paste, which is the same compound as the human pharmaceutical (with a few non-toxic additives like apple flavoring), but dosed for horses.

“I was forced with this decision and I was either going to lay there, suffer, and be at life’s peril of losing my time with my family, or I was going to eat that horse paste. And down the hatch it went,” Salier said. His wife, he added, “was forced into the same option.”

Salier told Deace that “within eight hours” he was feeling better.

“I started to feel the turnaround in my body,” he said, adding, “it turned her (his wife) around within six hours.”

People who resort to using the veterinary version of the drug generally know to convert the dosage to one that is appropriate for human consumption. Horse medication that contains Ivermectin and additional deworming agents are reportedly not safe for human consumption in any dosage.

Salier confirmed to American Greatness that he and his wife reduced the dosage, and took the pony paste for a week. He added that they were finally able to get a prescription through a pharmacy in Florida, but because demand was so high, they didn’t get the prescription until today.

“In the end, the option was forced on us by the refusal to fill the prescription,” he said.

“We had to gamble on the pony paste or gamble that I would survive what I was going through. We prayed, and put the paste in the applesauce, and down the hatch,” he added. “I thank God for that decision.”

After being forced to take livestock medicine to treat his COVID, the Marine is on the warpath.

“If you ever wanted to find out what it is to punch a Marine in the face and what type of response you’re gonna get, well, America, you’re about to see the type of response that you get. Because if you take on me and my family, and you stand between our physician and the health care that they have prescribed to me as a life-saving thing — in my opinion that is what it did — then you have got a fight on your hands and I am coming for that fight,” he told Deace.

Salier reiterated to American Greatness why he felt called to fight the giant corporation.

“I believe with all my heart that when our liberties and decisions for our own lives are stripped from us, our answer must be NO,” he said. “I will not stand for this.”

Salier has partnered with We the Patriots USA, a nonprofit organization that defends civil liberties, to raise money for his federal lawsuit against the pharmacist and Walmart.

Brian Festa, an attorney with We the Patriots USA, told Deace that it was “abhorrent” for the Walmart pharmacist to “play God” with the Saliers’ lives.

He pointed out that even the FDA acknowledges there are times when it is appropriate for health care providers to prescribe repurposed drugs.  It’s actually a fairly common practice.

“So, this is talking about off-label usage. This has been done for years,” Festa said.

“We’re talking about a drug, ivermectin, that was part of a treatment protocol that won the Nobel Prize in 2015 as an anti-parasitic for malaria. This is FDA-approved, it’s been used for decades as an anti-parasitic, and now you’re suddenly telling us in 2021 that it’s unsafe because it’s being used for off-label usage? Which again, is so common in the practice of medicine.”

Festa added that the pharmacist “had absolutely no right to tell Bill and his wife that he was not going to fill this prescription” and that Walmart should be held accountable for denying the Saliers access to a potentially lifesaving drug.

'We the Patriots USA' announced on its website on Tuesday that it had raised enough money to proceed with the lawsuit.

“Thanks to the incredible generosity of our supporters and the listeners on The Steve Deace Show, we are proud to announce that we have fully funded a lawsuit on behalf of Bill Salier, a retired Marine who was refused ivermectin at a Walmart pharmacy in Minnesota when he fell seriously ill with the covid bioweapon.” the group stated. 

“We fully support Bill in his fight against the covid fascists, and that’s why We The Patriots USA committed $25,000 to Bill’s lawsuit even before we launched yesterday’s fundraising campaign. After all, Bill served his country honorably in the U.S. Marine Corps. It’s time we fought for him!”

Tyler Durden Wed, 10/20/2021 - 23:30

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Shkreli’s former company pays $40m in price-gouging settlement

A pharma company formerly led by ‘pharma bro’ Martin Shkreli has settled a long-running lawsuit with the US
The post Shkreli’s former company pays $40m in price-gouging settlement appeared first on .

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A pharma company formerly led by ‘pharma bro’ Martin Shkreli has settled a long-running lawsuit with the US federal government over massive price increases for an off-patent drug treatment for people with an HIV-related disease.

Vyera Pharma – known as Turing Pharma when the scandal first emerged several years ago – will pay $40 million in settlement of the charges that it raised the price of Daraprim (pyrimethamine) for toxoplasmosis, a life-threatening parasitic infection that affects people with HIV, by around 4,000%.

Shkreli himself is already serving a seven-year prison term for securities fraud, and will have to answer the same accusations in a trial that is due to start next week.

He had been dubbed “the most hated man in America” for his arrogant and defiant posturing whilst acting as chief executive of Turing after the company’s decision to raise the price of the drug hit headlines around the world.

At the moment Shkreli is scheduled for release in October 2022, after an attempt last year to secure an early release to fight the coronavirus epidemic – branded as “delusional” by the judge who considered the request – was turned down.

The Vyera agreement was revealed in a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) statement yesterday , which said that Shkreli masterminded the scheme to fleece patients dependent on Daraprim.

His company not only raised the price from $17.50 to $750 per tablet – leaving some patients forced to pay up to $16,000 in out-of-pocket co-pays – but also “concocted an elaborate web of restrictions to illegally block competitors from producing a cheaper option,” it said.

The order bans Shkreli’s associate Kevin Mulleady – Vyera’s former CEO – from working in the pharma industry for seven years, and requires Vyera and its Swiss parent Phoenixus to pay $10 million upfront in relief to victims, with another $30 million payable over the next 10 years “if the companies’ financial condition improves.”

The companies are also required to make Daraprim available to any potential generic competitor at list price.

Vyera had previously said the FTC’s actions were “without merit” and it denied claims that it  prevented additional potential competitors from entering the market. It has now agreed not to participate in any activity that might mirror the actions laid out in the FTC’s complaint.

“Today’s action puts money back in the pockets of drug patients fleeced by a monopolistic scheme,” said FTC chair Lina Khan.

“This strong relief sets a new standard and puts corporate leaders on notice that they will face severe consequences for ripping off the public by wantonly monopolising markets,” she added.

The post Shkreli’s former company pays $40m in price-gouging settlement appeared first on .

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Life Sciences Expansions Take Off as 2021 Wraps Up

Several life sciences companies and life science-focused real estate firms announced expansion plans as 2021 comes to an end.

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Life Sciences Expansions Take Off as 2021 Wraps Up

Several life sciences companies and life science-focused real estate firms have announced expansion plans as 2021 comes to an end. Here’s a look.

Novavax to Expand Maryland Campus

Novavax, on the cusp of getting its COVID-19 vaccine authorized in numerous countries around the world, is expanding its footprint in Gaithersburg, Md., where it is headquartered. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is expected to authorize the company’s vaccine soon, and so is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Czechia has already ordered 370,000 doses, with deliveries expected at the beginning of 2022. The company also has a deal with Fujifilm Diosynth Biotechnologies to manufacture millions of doses of the Novavax vaccines at its facilities in Billingham, U.K., with a £400 million investment in expansion.

Four Corners Acquired 150,000-Square-Foot Complex in Belmont, Calif.

Four Corners Properties acquired a 150,000-square-foot office building in Belmont, Calif., called the Shoreway Innovation Center. The seller was Westlake Group. Westlake bought it in 2016 for $61 million. The company plans to expand its use for life sciences, noting that 82% of it is currently leased to a mix of tenants with an average of less than three years lease term remaining.

“Shoreway Innovation Center offers the opportunity to bring office and life sciences space to a market where tenant demand is far outpacing available supply,” said Mike Taquino, executive vice president of CBRE’s Northern California Capital Markets team.

Genentech Leases Building Under Construction in South San Francisco

Source: BioSpace

Boston Properties and Alexandria Real Estate Equities are leasing a building under construction in South San Francisco to Genentech. It will be the first phase of a life sciences campus. The building is at 751 Gateway and is 229,000 square feet. The campus will be called Gateway Commons and is a joint venture between the two real estate firms. They expect initial occupancy toward the end of 2024. Genentech has been headquartered in South San Francisco for forty years, with a large corporate headquarters made up of 4.7 million square feet of five neighborhood hubs. The new site is about one mile’s distance from their main campus.

Mispro Biotech to Open New Facility in North Carolina in Early 2022

Mispro Biotech Services plans to open a new facility in Research Triangle Park (RTP), N.C., in early 2022. Mispro is a leading contract vivarium organization (CVO). The new facility, a full-service vivarium research facility, will be central to one of RTP’s biopark campuses.

“Since we first opened our doors here in 2013, we have seen incredible growth in the RTP cluster,” said Philippe Lamarre, chief executive officer of Mispro. “The time was right to expand into a new facility with more space and modern amenities where we can support the influx of biotechs who are seeking in vivo lab space.”

Laura Gunter, president of NCBIO, representing the life sciences industry in North Carolina, noted, “Mispro has become a cornerstone of the Triangle ecosystem as contract research and support companies are finding increased favor. Biotechs of all sizes and therapeutic disciplines are focusing more on their core competencies, which is opening the door to innovation like Mispro’s contract vivarium option. We are pleased to see their decision to expand here and support more North Carolina companies.”

BioSpace source:

https://www.biospace.com/article/life-science-companies-announce-expansion-plans-as-they-wrap-up-2021

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U.S. FDA authorizes use of AstraZeneca COVID-19 antibody cocktail

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on December 8 authorized the use of AstraZeneca’s antibody cocktail to prevent Covid-19 infections in individuals with weak immune systems or a history of severe side effects from coronavirus vaccines.

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U.S. FDA authorizes use of AstraZeneca COVID-19 antibody cocktail

(Reuters) – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday authorized the use of AstraZeneca’s (AZN.L) antibody cocktail to prevent COVID-19 infections in individuals with weak immune systems or a history of severe side effects from coronavirus vaccines.

The antibody cocktail, Evusheld, is only authorized for adults and adolescents who are not currently infected with the novel coronavirus and have not recently been exposed to an infected individual, the regulator said.

The logo for AstraZeneca is seen outside its North America headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., March 22, 2021. REUTERS/Rachel Wisniewski/File Photo

The authorization for the therapy, made up of two monoclonal antibodies tixagevimab and cilgavimab, marks a significant step for AstraZeneca, whose widely used COVID-19 vaccine is yet to be approved by U.S. authorities.

AstraZeneca last month had agreed to supply the U.S. government with 700,000 doses of Evusheld, which had earlier shown to cut the risk of people developing any COVID-19 symptoms by 77% in a late-stage trial.

While vaccines rely on an intact immune system to develop targeted antibodies and infection-fighting cells, Evusheld contains lab-made antibodies designed to linger in the body for months to contain the virus in case of an infection.

AstraZeneca’s therapy, given in two sequential injections, is designed to last several months to a year.

Although vaccines currently provide the best defense against COVID-19, certain immune compromised individuals or those who have a history of severe adverse reactions to a vaccine need an alternative prevention option, said Patrizia Cavazzoni, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

However, the FDA added that pre-exposure prevention with Evusheld is not a substitute for vaccination in individuals for whom COVID-19 vaccination is recommended.

Monoclonal antibodies aim to stop COVID-19 from worsening during early, milder stages. Drugmakers such as Eli Lilly (LLY.N), Regeneron (REGN.O), and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK.L) with partner Vir (VIR.O) make similar therapies.

Reporting by Manas Mishra and Bhanvi Satija in Bengaluru; Editing by Shounak Dasgupta

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

 

Reuters source:

https://www.reuters.com/business/healthcare-pharmaceuticals/us-fda-authorizes-astrazenecas-covid-19-antibody-drug-2021-12-08

 

 

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