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Kessler Foundation awarded $345,000 grant by New Jersey Commission on brain injury research

EAST HANOVER, NJ, June 2, 2022 – Kessler scientists received two grants from the New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research, totaling $345,379….

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EAST HANOVER, NJ, June 2, 2022 – Kessler scientists received two grants from the New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research, totaling $345,379. Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, and Jean Lengenfelder, PhD, were awarded pilot study grants for two separate projects aimed at improving the lives of individuals with brain injury.

Credit: Kessler Foundation

EAST HANOVER, NJ, June 2, 2022 – Kessler scientists received two grants from the New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research, totaling $345,379. Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, and Jean Lengenfelder, PhD, were awarded pilot study grants for two separate projects aimed at improving the lives of individuals with brain injury.

Dr. Chiaravalloti, director, Centers for Neuropsychology, Neuroscience and Traumatic Brain Research, received a two-year grant of $169,383 for her study titled, “Examining the long-term neurological impact of COVID-19 in traumatic brain injury (TBI).” Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is a collaborating institution. Dr. Chiaravalloti and partners will examine and document the impact of COVID-19 on individuals with pre-existing, moderate-to-severe TBI as compared with previously neurologically healthy individuals.

“The risks of COVID-19 complications may be higher in individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI,” says Dr. Chiaravalloti. “In this pilot study, we will identify participants with and without TBI who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and re-evaluate their cognitive and neurological functioning with annual follow-ups. Doing so will enable us to directly compare the impact of COVID-19 in these two groups,” she explains.

Dr. Lengenfelder, assistant director, Center for Traumatic Brain Injury Research, received a two-year grant of $175,996 for her study titled, “Improving social skills for young people with brain injury,” a critically significant area for the chronic management of disease in youth with brain injury. Dr. Lengenfelder will examine whether a social skills treatment program currently used for individuals with autism spectrum disorder has the potential to improve social skills in young adults with brain injury transitioning to the workforce (ages 15-25).

Dr. Lengenfelder intends to translate the program into a virtual format and adapt the content for maximal learning. “We will evaluate the program delivery and pilot the social skills treatment with individuals with brain injury,” explains Dr. Lengenfelder, adding, “In addition we will examine changes in social skills following the program and evaluate the impact of the treatment on social functioning, employment readiness, and quality of life for young adults with brain injury. By improving their skills and abilities, we anticipate individuals with brain injury may become more independent and experience greater quality of life,” concludes Dr. Lengenfelder.

Funding: New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research grants #CBIR22PIL003 and #CBIR22PIL029

About the New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research

The New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research promotes necessary research that will result in the treatment and cure for traumatic injuries of the brain, thereby giving hope to an ever-increasing number of residents who suffer the debilitating effects of this injury. To achieve these goals the Commission will encourage and promote significant, original research projects in New Jersey emphasizing nerve regeneration as a means to a cure for brain injury through the funding of approved research projects at qualifying research institutions in the state. In addition, the Commission will establish and maintain, in conjunction with the New Jersey Department of Health, a central registry of all persons who sustain traumatic brain injuries.

About Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation, a major nonprofit organization in the field of disability, is a global leader in rehabilitation research that seeks to improve cognition, mobility, and long-term outcomes — including employment — for people with neurological disabilities caused by diseases and injuries of the brain and spinal cord. Kessler Foundation leads the nation in funding innovative programs that expand opportunities for employment for people with disabilities. For more information, visit KesslerFoundation.org

For information, contact:

Deb Hauss, senior staff writer, 973.324.8372, Dhauss@KesslerFoundation.org
Carolann Murphy, senior medical writer, Cmurphy@KesslerFoundation.org

Stay Connected with Kessler Foundation

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Government

Prevalence of gender-diverse youth in rural Appalachia exceeds previous estimates, WVU study shows

Gender-diverse youth are at an increased risk of suicide and depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the prevalence…

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Gender-diverse youth are at an increased risk of suicide and depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the prevalence of gender diversity is largely unknown—especially in rural areas, where studies of the topic are rare. 

Credit: WVU Photo/Sean Hines

Gender-diverse youth are at an increased risk of suicide and depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the prevalence of gender diversity is largely unknown—especially in rural areas, where studies of the topic are rare. 

To fill that knowledge gap, researchers at West Virginia University— along with their colleagues at the University of Washington and Boise State University — surveyed junior high and high school students in rural Appalachia about their gender identity. They asked about the students’ internal sense of being male, being female or having another identity, like nonbinary. They found that more than 7% of young people surveyed shared a gender identity that did not fully align with the sex they were assigned at birth.  

These findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

Being gender diverse, including being transgender, nonbinary or having another gender identity that doesn’t match the sex assigned at birth, is not a medical concern and is considered a normal part of human experience, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Even though gender diversity isn’t an illness, some young people who are gender diverse experience distress when their gender doesn’t align with their physical characteristics or treatment in society. This distress, called “gender dysphoria,” can be associated with higher rates of depression or even thoughts of self-harm, prior research suggests.

“We have a lot of studies that suggest gender-diverse youth are two to four times as likely to experience depression and thoughts of self-harm as their cisgender peers, or young people whose sex assigned at birth and gender identity fully align,” said WVU School of Medicine researcher Dr. Kacie Kidd, who co-authored the study. “This is an area where we need to do more research. We need to better understand how to support these young people, especially now that we are increasingly recognizing that they are here and would likely benefit from the support.”

Other study authors include Alfgeir Kristjansson, an associate professor with the WVU School of Public Health; Brandon Benton, a nurse with WVU Medicine; Gina Sequeira, of the University of Washington; and Michael Mann and Megan Smith, of Boise State University. 

Few studies have asked young people directly about their gender identity. 

A 2017 study suggested that West Virginia had the highest per capita rate of transgender youth in the country at just over 1%. 

“Prior studies have used less inclusive questions when asking young people about their identity,” said Kidd, an assistant professor of pediatrics and internal medicine. “We suspected that this underestimated the prevalence of gender-diverse youth.” 

She and her colleagues had previously asked these more inclusive questions to young people in Pittsburgh, a city in Appalachia. Nearly 10% of youth in that sample reported having a gender-diverse identity. 

“Despite the high prevalence of gender-diverse identities found in our Pittsburgh study, information about rural areas was still unknown,” Kidd said. “We suspect that many of the young people in rural Appalachia who shared their gender-diverse identities with us in this study may benefit from additional support, especially if they do not feel seen and supported at home and in their community.” 

This new study is one of many to recognize that researchers interested in gender diversity face a dearth of data when it comes to rural areas.  

It’s also one of many studies to recognize that gender-diverse individuals can face a scarcity of health care options, affirming social networks and other forms of support in those same rural areas.

For example, in a recent study led by Megan Gandy, BSW program director and assistant professor at the WVU School of Social Work, up to 61% of participants said they had to travel out of West Virginia to access gender-related care.

And another recent study conducted by Zachary Ramsey, a doctoral candidate in the WVU School of Public Health, found that rural areas could present unique barriers to sexual and gender minorities. 

Those barriers included discrimination and heteronormativity — or, the belief that a heterosexual and cisgender identity is the only “normal” one. They also included a lack of training for health care providers in handling LGBTQ concerns.

“Adolescent mental health is at a crisis point, according to the Centers for Disease Control,” Kidd said. “We have an access concern because so many young people need mental health services nationwide and we just don’t have enough mental health professionals to meet that need. It’s a growing problem and certainly gender-diverse youth are at an even greater risk.” 

In CDC data, the number of adolescents reporting poor mental health has increased, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Support from parents, schools, communities and health care providers has been associated with improved mental health outcomes, especially for gender-diverse youth.  

“Gender-diverse youth are incredible young people, and — as our study found — many of them live in rural areas,” Kidd said. “It is important that we ensure they have access to support so that they are able to thrive.”

Citation: The prevalence of gender-diverse youth in a rural Appalachian region”

Research reported in this publication was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention under Award Number U48DP006391 and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality under Award Number 5K12HS02693-03. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of CDC or AHRQ.


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Economics

NY Fed Inflation Expectations Plunge Most On Record, But There Is A Catch…

NY Fed Inflation Expectations Plunge Most On Record, But There Is A Catch…

Readers will recall that according to Jerome Powell’s own presser,…

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NY Fed Inflation Expectations Plunge Most On Record, But There Is A Catch...

Readers will recall that according to Jerome Powell's own presser, the Fed's first 75bps rate hike in more than two decades was erroneously prompted by an abnormally higher preliminary UMich 5-10 year inflation print (which was subsequently revised lower in the final number). Well, if the Fed is so data-dependent that it now react to preliminary econ data prints, then the latest data out of the NY Fed's monthly Consumer Expectations survey would suggest a rate cut may be on deck.

Today at 11am ET, the NY Fed released its latest Consumer Expectations survey which showed a record drop in short-, medium- and longer-term inflation expectations: specifically, inflation expectations at the 1-year horizon decreased to 6.22% in July - the lowest since February - from the previous month’s 6.78%, the biggest monthly drop on record as expectations about year-ahead price increases for gas and food fell sharply. At the same time, median three-year-ahead inflation expectations also declined, from 3.62% to 3.18%, lowest since April 2021.

"Both decreases were broad based across income groups, but largest among respondents with annual household incomes under $50k and respondents with no more than a high school education," the report noted.

Finally, the median five-year ahead inflation expectations, surveyed intermittently since the beginning of this year, fell from 2.8% to 2.3%. After being stable at 3.0% during the first three months of the year, the series has been trending down since. Disagreement across respondents in their five-year ahead inflation expectations remained unchanged in July.

The Median inflation uncertainty—or the uncertainty expressed regarding future inflation outcomes—declined slightly at both the one- and three-year-ahead horizons. Uncertainty at the five-year-ahead horizon decreased more substantially.

Putting the move in context, while the NY Fed's 3 Year inflation expectations overshot most other forward inflation trackers, it also has tumbled the most in recent months.

 

Separately, home price growth expectations and year-ahead spending growth expectations continued to pull back from recent series highs. Households’ income growth expectations improved. Some more details:

  • Median expected change in home prices one year from now fell to 3.46% from 4.38%, its third consecutive decrease and its lowest reading of the series since November 2020. The decline was broad based across education and income groups and across census regions, but was largest in the Northeast census region.
  • Decrease in expected gas price growth second largest on record in available data going back to 2013; decline in food price growth expectations largest since series began; Over the next year consumers expect gasoline prices to rise 1.46%; food prices to rise 6.66%; medical costs to rise 9.2%; the price of a college education to rise 8.43%; rent prices to rise 9.91%
  • Expectations about year-ahead price changes decreased sharply by 4.2 percentage points for gas (to 1.5%) and by 2.5 percentage points for food (to 6.7%). The decrease in expected gas price growth was the second largest in the series, just below the 4.5 percentage point decline in April of this year. The decline in food price growth expectations was the largest observed since the beginning of the series in June 2013. There were smaller declines in expectations about year-ahead changes in rent (from 10.3% to 9.9%), medical care (from 9.5% to 9.2%), and college education (from 8.7% to 8.4%).

The red arrow on the chart below shows just how remarkable the collapse in gas price expectations is: while we are confident the survey organizers phrased this question on purpose in a way to make the Biden admin look good, we doubt they expected that the result would be respondents calling for a mid-2023 depression!

Aside from inflation, survey respondents had the following expectations about the...

Labor market:

  • Median one-year-ahead expected earnings growth remained unchanged at 3.0% in July for the seventh consecutive month.
  • Mean unemployment expectations—or the mean probability that the U.S. unemployment rate will be higher one year from now—decreased by 0.2 percentage point to 40.2%.
  • The mean perceived probability of losing one’s job in the next 12 months declined slightly to 11.8% from 11.9%, remaining well below its pre-pandemic reading of 13.8% in February 2020. The mean probability of leaving one’s job voluntarily in the next 12 months rose to 19.5% from 18.6% in June. The series has moved within a narrow 18.6% to 20.4% range over the past year.
  • The mean perceived probability of finding a job in the next three months (if one’s current job was lost) declined to 55.9% from 56.8%, moving slightly below its trailing 12-month average of 56.5%.

A quick aside here to point out just how ludicrous the survey now is thanks to today's responses which on one hand see a collapse in inflation expectations... and also at the same time the majority sees the unemployment rate dropping from here to new all time lows (as just 40% see higher unemployment).

Yes, we know that survey respondents don't really do Econ 101, but one would at least have hoped that the survey organizers would avoid a situation where they have two mutually impossible outcomes!

Household Finance

  • The median expected growth in household income increased by 0.2 percentage point in July to 3.4%, a new series high. The increase was most pronounced for respondents without a college education and with lower (below $50k) annual household incomes.
  • Median year-ahead nominal household spending growth expectations fell by 1.5 percentage points to 6.9% in July, well below its series high of 9.0% in May, but remains above its trailing 12-month average of 6.4%. The decline, the largest in this series, was broad-based across age, education, and income groups.
  • Perceptions of credit access compared to a year ago continued to deteriorate in July, with the share of respondents finding it harder to obtain credit now than a year ago reaching a series high. Expectations about future credit availability improved slightly.
  • The average perceived probability of missing a minimum debt payment over the next three months decreased by 0.5 percentage point to 10.8%, remaining below its pre-pandemic level of 11.4% in February 2020.
  • The median expectation regarding a year-ahead change in taxes (at current income level) increased by 0.4 percentage point to 4.9%.
  • Median year-ahead expected growth in government debt decreased by 0.4 percentage point to 10.7%.
  • The mean perceived probability that the average interest rate on saving accounts will be higher 12 months from now decreased to 34.1% from 35.7%.
  • Perceptions about households’ current financial situations compared to a year ago improved slightly in July, with slightly fewer respondents reporting being financially worse off than they were a year ago. Respondents were also more optimistic about their household’s financial situation in the year ahead, with fewer respondents expecting their financial situation to deteriorate a year from now.
  • The mean perceived probability that U.S. stock prices will be higher 12 months from now increased to 34.3% from 33.8%.

In summary, while this survey clearly is meant to serve political means (i.e., collapsing gas price expectations), it fails to be even remotely coherent, with most respondents expecting unemployment to fall further. Newsflash: that means no recession, it also means gas prices soar from here.

But since we doubt anyone except us will have read the fine print of the survey, the media will be happy to pump the headline that "inflation expectations" are collapsing for one simple reason: it makes both Biden and the Fed look good. As for the final outcome of current fiscal and monetary policies, let's just check back in one year and see where inflation truly is in the summer of 2023.

More in the full NY Fed report here.

Tyler Durden Mon, 08/08/2022 - 12:40

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Economics

US Shale Defy Calls To Boost Output As They Funnel Profits To Shareholders

US Shale Defy Calls To Boost Output As They Funnel Profits To Shareholders

US shale is still acting with restraint in terms of production…

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US Shale Defy Calls To Boost Output As They Funnel Profits To Shareholders

US shale is still acting with restraint in terms of production growth despite President Biden's calls to increase supplies to squash energy prices that were driven up due to soaring demand, decarbonization efforts, lack of refinery capacity, limited spare capacity, and, of course, geopolitical uncertainty surrounding Russia's invasion of Ukraine. 

ConocoPhillips, Pioneer Natural Resources, and Devon Energy recorded soaring profits in the second quarter, though many of these top shale oil and gas producers were reluctant to boost capital spending to increase output despite elevated prices for crude, according to Financial Times

Executives of these companies are under pressure from Wall Street to return record profits in the form of dividends and share buybacks to investors rather than increasing capital expenditures to boost production. It comes after years of burning cash and issuing equity to survive the multiple boom-bust cycles that paralyzed the shale industry. 

Then there was the chaos of slumping crude oil demand in the virus pandemic lockdowns, and WTI plunged below $0 per barrel for the first time. US shale drillers have rearranged their priorities from exceptional growth rates to stable rates that attempt to prevent another dark winter. The capital that would typically be deployed for drilling is being rerouted to shareholders:

"Unless we have shareholders that come in and say, look, we absolutely — we do not like these big dividends. We do not like your share repurchase program. We want you to go back to a growth model," Rick Muncrief, chief executive of Devon Energy, a top shale producer, told investors. "Until we see that, I see no reason to change our strategy." 

Other shale executives reiterated Muncrief's message as they all remain defiant to the Biden administration's request to increase production. In response, Biden and other western politicians have slammed shale companies' decision not to increase output. 

According to the Energy Information Administration, US crude production is around 12.1 million barrels a day. Production levels remain 800,000b/d from the pre-coronavirus pandemic highs. 

Occidental Petroleum is another shale company concentrating on debt repayments and cleaning up its balance sheet than expanding production. 

"We don't feel the need to grow production," said the company's chief executive Vicki Hollub. "We feel like one of the best values right now is an investment in our own stock." Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway has bought a 20% stake in the company, helping equity value to double over the past year. 

"This year has marked a reversal in the shale industry's fortunes after hefty losses during the pandemic, although fears of a recession have once again cast a cloud over its prospects," FT said. 

Shale also has another problem: its inability to raise production due to bottlenecks in the industry. 

Last month, Halliburton Co.'s CEO Jeff Miller warned oilfield equipment market is so tight that oil explorers are limited to the amount of production they can bring online. 

Miller said oil companies don't have enough fracking equipment for newly leased wells this year. He said diesel-powered and electric equipment are in short supply, "making it almost impossible to add incremental capacity this year." 

similar message was conveyed by Exxon Mobil, whose CEO said that global oil markets might remain tight for another three to five years primarily because of a lack of investment since the pandemic began.

"Availability of frac fleets is one of main bottlenecks impeding oil and natural as production growth for the next 18 months," Robert Drummond, chief executive officer of fracking firm NexTier Oilfield Solutions, recently told Reuters

... this bottleneck is due to several years of divestment and decarbonization -- making the days of shale roaring back to life over for now.   

So shale execs funnel profits back to shareholders instead of boosting production -- and even if they were to increase output, there are severe bottlenecks in the equipment space that inhibits bringing on new rigs. 

Making matters worse for the Biden administration, OPEC+ only increased production last week by a measly 100k barrel per day in output for September - considerably less than the 300-400k increase expected by many. This means OPEC+ has limited spare capacity, so crude prices should stay elevated overall. 

Tyler Durden Mon, 08/08/2022 - 12:15

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