Connect with us

Economics

Job Seekers More Likely to Apply to Companies That Prioritize Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, Survey Shows

Job Seekers More Likely to Apply to Companies That Prioritize Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, Survey Shows
PR Newswire
TROY, Mich., May 18, 2022

National survey reveals Americans expect employers to remove discriminatory hiring practices
TROY, M…

Published

on

Job Seekers More Likely to Apply to Companies That Prioritize Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, Survey Shows

PR Newswire

National survey reveals Americans expect employers to remove discriminatory hiring practices

TROY, Mich., May 18, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Nearly three in four Americans say they are more likely to seek employment with companies that are committed to breaking down discriminatory hiring practices, according to an annual survey conducted by staffing and workforce solutions provider Kelly.

Kelly today revealed the findings from its annual Equity@Work survey that show Americans want companies to provide greater access to work for underemployed talent groups including job seekers with criminal backgrounds, those on the autism spectrum, veterans, older workers, and women. More than 4 in 5 (83%) agree employers should do more to remove barriers that keep job seekers in these talent groups from being hired or promoted.

"Companies are in desperate need of skilled talent. At the same time, millions of qualified job seekers face significant barriers to employment," says Kelly Vice President and Equity@Work Program Manager Pam Sands. "It's time employers provide fairer access to work for these talent groups. Our survey results indicate it will have a positive impact on their ability to identify skilled workers across the board."

Nearly 33% of working-age Americans have a criminal offense on their record that often disqualifies them from finding employment. The unemployment rate among adults on the autism spectrum is around 85%. Veterans without four-year degrees often struggle to find civilian employment. Older job seekers can find it challenging to transition careers and there are nearly two million fewer women in the labor force due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Kelly, which places 350,000 job seekers every year, launched its Equity@Work initiative in 2020 to remove systemic employment barriers for these Americans. Its survey of 1,020 adults in the U.S. shows companies can benefit from hiring policies that embrace these talent groups:

  • 76% of Americans say they are more likely to support businesses committed to breaking down barriers to work.

  • 72% say they are more likely to seek employment with companies committed to eliminating these barriers.

  • 80% say employers should value the relevant skills military veterans have acquired and factor them into hiring decisions.

  • 71% say they are more likely to support businesses that make employment opportunities available to individuals on the autism spectrum.

  • 70% say employers should eliminate or reduce blanket-bans that automatically reject job seekers who have minor, non-violent offenses on their criminal record.

  • 62% agree that women forced out of the workforce due to the pandemic face reduced earning potential and advancement opportunities when they return to work.

  • More than half of Americans (52%) say Baby Boomers face issues of ageism at work.

"The message is loud and clear: Americans expect companies to do better," Sands says. "Recruiting from these underrepresented talent groups is not just the right thing to do, it's good business."

For full survey results and information on Kelly's Equity@Work initiative, visit EquityAtWork.com.  

Equity@Work Survey Methodology
The survey was conducted online by Atomik Research. 1,020 adults in the U.S. completed the survey between Feb. 15 and 21, 2022. The overall margin of error fell within +/- 3 percentage points with a confidence interval of 95%. Researchers implemented sample quotas based on gender identity, geographical regions, age groups and ethnicity to reflect similar statistically representative ratios based on U.S. Census reports.

About Kelly®
Kelly (Nasdaq: KELYA) (Nasdaq: KELYB) connects talented people to companies in need of their skills in areas including Science, Engineering, Education, Office, Contact Center, Light Industrial, and more. We're always thinking about what's next in the evolving world of work, and we help people ditch the script on old ways of thinking and embrace the value of all workstyles in the workplace. We directly employ nearly 350,000 people around the world and connect thousands more with work through our global network of talent suppliers and partners in our outsourcing and consulting practice. Visit kellyservices.com and let us help with what's next for you. Follow Kelly on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Media Contact
Christian Taske
248-561-8823
christian.taske@kellyservices.com

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/job-seekers-more-likely-to-apply-to-companies-that-prioritize-diversity-equity--inclusion-survey-shows-301550042.html

SOURCE Kelly Services, Inc.

Read More

Continue Reading

Economics

Expert on Bath & Body Works: ‘an easy double the next three years’

Bath & Body Works Inc (NYSE: BBWI) might have been painful for the shareholders this year, but the road ahead will likely be a rewarding one, says…

Published

on

Bath & Body Works Inc (NYSE: BBWI) might have been painful for the shareholders this year, but the road ahead will likely be a rewarding one, says the Senior Vice President and Portfolio Manager at Westwood Group.

BBWI separated from Victoria’s Secret

The retail chain separated from Victoria’s Secret in 2021, which, as per Lauren Hill, clears the way for a 100% increase in the stock price in the coming years. On CNBC’s “Closing Bell: Overtime”, she said:

[Bath & Body Works] has really strong pricing power. They have 85% of their supply chain in the United States and with the Victoria’s Secret brand now gone, I think it’s a wonderful buy; an easy double the next three years.

Last month, the Columbus-headquartered company reported results for its fiscal first quarter that topped Wall Street expectations.

Bath & Body Works is a reopening play

The stock currently trades at a PE multiple of 6.64. Hill is convinced Bath & Body works is a reopening name and will perform so much better as the world continues to pull out of the pandemic. She noted:

Customers have missed buying their scented products in store and as their social occasion calendars fill up, they are getting back out there and buying more gifts, including Bath & Body Works products.

Hill also dubbed BBWI a great pick amidst the ongoing inflationary pressures because of its reasonably priced products. Shares are down more than 50% versus the start of 2022.

The post Expert on Bath & Body Works: ‘an easy double the next three years’ appeared first on Invezz.

Read More

Continue Reading

Economics

Majority Of C-Suite Execs Thinking Of Quitting, 40% Overwhelmed At Work: Deloitte Survey

Majority Of C-Suite Execs Thinking Of Quitting, 40% Overwhelmed At Work: Deloitte Survey

Authored by Naveen Anthrapully via The Epoch Times,

A…

Published

on

Majority Of C-Suite Execs Thinking Of Quitting, 40% Overwhelmed At Work: Deloitte Survey

Authored by Naveen Anthrapully via The Epoch Times,

A majority of C-suite executives are considering leaving their jobs, according to a Deloitte survey of 2,100 employees and C-level executives from the United States, Canada, the UK, and Australia.

Almost 70 percent of executives admitted that they are seriously thinking of quitting their jobs for a better opportunity that supports their well-being, according to the survey report published on June 22. Over three-quarters of executives said that the COVID-19 pandemic had negatively affected their well-being.

Roughly one in three employees and C-suite executives admitted to constantly struggling with poor mental health and fatigue. While 41 percent of executives “always” or “often” felt stressed, 40 percent were overwhelmed, 36 percent were exhausted, 30 percent felt lonely, and 26 percent were depressed.

“Most employees (83 percent) and executives (74 percent) say they’re facing obstacles when it comes to achieving their well-being goals—and these are largely tied to their job,” the report says. “In fact, the top two hurdles that people cited were a heavy workload or stressful job (30 percent), and not having enough time because of long work hours (27 percent).”

While 70 percent of C-suite execs admitted to considering quitting, this number was at only 57 percent among other employees. The report speculated that a reason for such a wide gap might be the fact that top-level executives are often in a “stronger financial position,” due to which they can afford to seek new career opportunities.

Interestingly, while only 56 percent of employees think their company executives care about their well-being, a much higher 91 percent of C-suite administrators were of the opinion that their employees believe their leaders took care of them. The report called this a “notable gap.”

Resignation Rates

The Deloitte report comes amid a debate about resignation rates in the U.S. workforce. Over 4.4 million Americans quit their jobs in April, with job openings hitting 11.9 million, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. In the period from January 2021 to February 2022, almost 57 million Americans left their jobs.

Though some are terming it the “Great Resignation,” giving it a negative connotation, the implication is not entirely true since most of those who quit jobs did so for other opportunities. In the same 14 months, almost 89 million people were hired. There are almost two jobs open for every unemployed person in the United States, according to MarketWatch.

In an Economic Letter from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco published in April, economics professor Bart Hobijn points out that high waves of resignations were common during rapid economic recoveries in the postwar period prior to 2000.

“The quits waves in manufacturing in 1948, 1951, 1953, 1966, 1969, and 1973 are of the same order of magnitude as the current wave,” he wrote. “All of these waves coincide with periods when payroll employment grew very fast, both in the manufacturing sector and the total nonfarm sector.”

Tyler Durden Sat, 06/25/2022 - 20:30

Read More

Continue Reading

Spread & Containment

Optimism Slowly Returns To The Tourism Sector

Optimism Slowly Returns To The Tourism Sector

Coming off the worst year in tourism history, 2021 wasn’t much of an improvement, as travel…

Published

on

Optimism Slowly Returns To The Tourism Sector

Coming off the worst year in tourism history, 2021 wasn't much of an improvement, as travel remained subdued in the face of the persistent threat posed by Covid-19.

According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), export revenues from tourism (including passenger transport receipts) remained more than $1 trillion below pre-pandemic levels in 2021, marking the second trillion-dollar loss for the tourism industry in as many years.

As Statista's Felix Richter details below, while the brief rebound in the summer months of 2020 had fueled hopes of a quick recovery for the tourism sector, those hopes were dashed with each subsequent wave of the pandemic.

And despite a record-breaking global vaccine rollout, travel experts struggled to stay optimistic in 2021, as governments kept many restrictions in place in their effort to curb the spread of new, potentially more dangerous variants of the coronavirus.

Halfway through 2022, optimism has returned to the industry, however, as travel demand is ticking up in many regions.

You will find more infographics at Statista

According to UNWTO's latest Tourism Barometer, industry experts are now considerably more confident than they were at the beginning of the year, with 48 percent of expert panel participants expecting a full recovery of the tourism sector in 2023, up from just 32 percent in January. 44 percent of surveyed industry insiders still think it'll take until 2024 or longer for tourism to return to pre-pandemic levels, another notable improvement from 64 percent in January.

Tyler Durden Sat, 06/25/2022 - 21:00

Read More

Continue Reading

Trending