New Study Examines Water Governance: Could Less Be More?

Feb 12 17:02 2020 Print This Article

Researchers from the Universities of Geneva (UNIGE) and Lausanne (UNIL) analysed water governance in six European countries from 1750 to 2006.

The researchers found that there has been an inflationary trend in the number of regulations, and that—far from improving the situation—this has led to serious malfunctions in the system.

The use of natural resources, such as water, has been regulated for centuries with the aim of improving the management and behaviour of private and public actors on an ongoing basis. But, does the never-ending introduction of new regulations really have a positive effect? Or, does a surfeit of rules cause malfunctions and lead to disturbing overlaps?

In an attempt to answer these questions, researchers from UNIGE and UNIL analysed water governance regulations in six European countries from 1750 to 2006. The results, published in the journal Ecological Economics, show that rules designed to improve resource management eventually come into conflict in the long run, creating an equal number of positive and negative effects until the system falls apart. At this point, the only way out is for the state to overhaul governance.

Read More

About Article Author

Water Canada

Water Canada is an influencer, a networker, and a newsmaker. Their editors and researchers know the industry. More importantly, they know the people implementing plans and projects on the frontlines. Thousands of readers turn to Water Canada for exclusive, insightful content that speaks to Canada’s water expertise, connects the country’s decision-makers, and promotes better water management and stewardship of the world's most important natural resource. The publication continues to be a trusted and reliable source for more than 35,000 professionals who follow Water Canada in print and online.

Related Items

“E” vs “SG” in ethical investing: how sustainable is mollification-by-cherrypicking

In the great game of whack-a-mole that is capital raising in Canada’s oil patch, it must be frustrating, for those whose full-time job when there isn’t a global pandemic is whacking the moles of ESG criteria on which they feel their companies may be vulnerable to criticism and hence subject to ...

Did wind-generated electricity displace gas-generated electricity in Ontario in June 2019?

Financiers of green energy projects often claim in public filings that the energy generated by the projects they have financed has avoided some definite number of tons of CO2 emissions. Run the numbers, and you usually find they have assumed some annual capacity factor, say 35 percent in the case o ...

Brilliant Light Power – Commercialization Status

by Daryl Roberts A potentially paradigm-shifting technology has been under development at an R&D firm in NJ called Brilliant Light Power.   For people monitoring the situation, the question currently is about the status of commercialization.   It is not a publicly held firm, but is in mid-stage ...

Emergency: The Citizen's Guide to Climate Action

Here is the link to the video of my public talk hosted by Academics for Climate - University of Regina held via Zoom on April 28, 2020 entitled 'Emergency: The Citizen's Guide to Climate Action'. This Zoom talk is part of the Academics for Climate Community Series: Towards a Better Understandi ...

The state of COVID-19 testing

In these unprecedented times, we know that controlling the spread of novel coronavirus requires social distancing and testing. While all of us are doing our parts to stay at home, there’s a lot of confusion, chaos and frustration surrounding coronavirus testing in the US.  Before going further, ...

Market Update: Investors Optimistic as Global Economies Reopen

The quickest bear market in the history of the US S&P 500 turned into the best 50-day bull market rally in history in May. By market close on June 3, 2020, the S&P 500 Index was up 37.7% from its March 23, 2020 low. This bullish investor sentiment has been based on the continued decline in new coro ...

A deep retrofit of homes and buildings is the megaproject Canada needs

Ramping down carbon emissions from homes and buildings can help us rebuild Canada’s economy after the pandemic. ...

Rebuilding Canada’s economy includes energy resiliency in remote communities (blog)

This is the moment to create a roadmap for a society that is more resilient to these macro shocks – whether they are brought about by a pandemic or climate change. Canada’s response must support a more resilient, healthier economy that is competitive and shows economic strength in a decarbonize ...