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Elizabeth Warren Demands Amazon Censor Best-Selling Books

Elizabeth Warren Demands Amazon Censor Best-Selling Books

Authored by Paul Joseph Watson via Summit News,

Senator Elizabeth Warren is demanding Amazon censor best-selling books because they contain information that challenges the official…

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Elizabeth Warren Demands Amazon Censor Best-Selling Books

Authored by Paul Joseph Watson via Summit News,

Senator Elizabeth Warren is demanding Amazon censor best-selling books because they contain information that challenges the official narrative on coronavirus.

Warren wrote a letter asserting that Amazon was complicit in spreading “COVID-19 misinformation” because it allows people to buy books authored by people like Dr. Joseph Mercola, who has been targeted by the mainstream media as a purveyor of “dangerous” fake news about COVID and vaccines.

“During the week of August 22, 2021, my staff conducted sample searches on Amazon.com of pandemic-related terms such as ‘COVID-19,’ ‘COVID,’ ‘vaccine,’ ‘COVID 19 vaccine,’ and ‘pandemic,’” Sen. Warren wrote in a letter addressed to Amazon’s CEO Andy Jassy.

“The top results consistently included highly-ranked and favorably-tagged books based on falsehoods about COVID-19 vaccines and cures.”

Of course, the claim that these are “falsehoods” is a completely arbitrary assertion made by Warren and her staff, with no objective standard of proof required.

Mercola was again singled out for condemnation.

“[Dr. Mercola] has posted over 600 articles on Facebook casting doubt on COVID-19 vaccines and been subject to multiple federal investigations (with one false- advertising investigation leading to a $2.95 million consumer settlement). But Amazon’s algorithms promoted ‘The Truth About COVID-19’ as a best seller and top result in response to common pandemic-related search terms,” Warren wrote.

As Cindy Harper highlights, Warren’s efforts to have Amazon ban books follows a similar effort by Rep. Adam Schiff, who claimed that 10 per cent of Amazon search results related to vaccines returned “misinformation” (a description again solely determined by Schiff and his staff).

At what point did we enter an era where the very thing that drove scientific progress for hundreds of years – challenging the official orthodoxy – is now treated as heresy?

Putting people on lists with terrorists and sex traffickers before deplatforming them from social media sites is not enough.

Erasing information published by actual doctors and scientific experts that dares to question the ever-shifting goalposts of what “the science” says is also insufficient.

Now the digital book burnings must begin.

*  *  *

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Tyler Durden Tue, 09/14/2021 - 14:51

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Potential COVID-19 Treatment Found in Llama Antibodies

The need to uncover effective COVID-19 treatments remains imperative, as case counts remain steady eighteen months into the pandemic. Recent findings point to unique antibodies produced by llamas—nanobodies—as a promising treatment. The small, stable,…

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A significant milestone in the COVID-19 pandemic was crossed this week. The number of deaths in the United States due to COVID-19—more than 675,000—has surpassed the number of deaths that occurred during the 1918 flu pandemic. In addition, there are still roughly 150,000 new cases every day. Eighteen months into the pandemic, the need for effective treatments against COVID-19 remains as great as ever.

One possible treatment, neutralizing single domain antibodies (nanobodies), has significant potential. The unique antibody produced by llamas is small, stable, and could possibly be administered as a nasal spray—an important characteristic as the antibody treatments currently in use require administration by infusion in the hospital. Now, new research shows that nanobodies can effectively target the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

The team from the Rosalind Franklin Institute found that short chains of the molecules, which can be produced in large quantities, showed “potent therapeutic efficacy in the Syrian hamster model of COVID-19 and separately, effective prophylaxis.”

This work is published in Nature Communications in the paper, “A potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing nanobody shows therapeutic efficacy in the Syrian golden hamster model of COVID-19.

The nanobodies, which bind tightly to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, neutralizing it in cell culture, could provide a cheaper and easier to use alternative to human antibodies taken from patients who have recovered from COVID-19.

“Nanobodies have a number of advantages over human antibodies,” said Ray Owens, PhD, head of protein production at the Rosalind Franklin Institute. “They are cheaper to produce and can be delivered directly to the airways through a nebulizer or nasal spray, so can be self-administered at home rather than needing an injection. This could have benefits in terms of ease of use by patients but it also gets the treatment directly to the site of infection in the respiratory tract.”

Credit: Rosalind Franklin Institute

The research team was able to generate the nanobodies by injecting a portion of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein into a llama called Fifi, who is part of the antibody production facility at the University of Reading. They were able to purify four nanobodies capable of binding to SARS-CoV-2. Four nanobodies (C5, H3, C1, F2) engineered as homotrimers had pmolar affinity for the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Crystal structures showed that C5 and H3 overlap the ACE2 epitope, while C1 and F2 bind to a different epitope.

Regarding their effectiveness against variants, the C1, H3, and C5 nanobodies all neutralized the Victoria strain, and the highly transmissible Alpha (B.1.1.7 first identified in Kent, U.K.) strain. In addition, C1 neutralizes the Beta (B.1.35, first identified in South Africa).

When one of the nanobody chains was administered to hamsters infected with SARS-CoV-2, the animals showed a marked reduction in disease, losing far less weight after seven days than those who remained untreated. Hamsters that received the nanobody treatment also had a lower viral load in their lungs and airways after seven days than untreated animals.

“Because we can see every atom of the nanobody bound to the spike, we understand what makes these agents so special,” said James Naismith, PhD, director of the Rosalind Franklin Institute. If successful and approved, nanobodies could provide an important treatment around the world as they are easier to produce than human antibodies and don’t need to be stored in cold storage facilities, added Naismith.

“Having medications that can treat the virus,” noted Naismith, “is still going to be very important, particularly as not all of the world is being vaccinated at the same speed and there remains a risk of new variants capable of bypassing vaccine immunity emerging.”

The researchers also hope the nanobody technology they have developed could form a so-called “platform technology” that can be rapidly adapted to fight other diseases.

The post Potential COVID-19 Treatment Found in Llama Antibodies appeared first on GEN - Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News.

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Researchers explain how nanomaterial aids antibody response, study it as antibody factory

AMES, Iowa – The researchers’ original task was to figure out how certain polymer nanomaterials provided for a low-inflammatory immune response and yet were able to boost antibody production as part of a single dose of vaccine. Credit: Nanovaccine…

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AMES, Iowa – The researchers’ original task was to figure out how certain polymer nanomaterials provided for a low-inflammatory immune response and yet were able to boost antibody production as part of a single dose of vaccine.

Credit: Nanovaccine Institute

AMES, Iowa – The researchers’ original task was to figure out how certain polymer nanomaterials provided for a low-inflammatory immune response and yet were able to boost antibody production as part of a single dose of vaccine.

Once they learned how these nanomaterials just 20 to 30 billionths of a meter in size acted as vaccine-aiding adjuvants, they decided to take the next scientific step.

Could these same tiny adjuvants carry real-world antigens to the immune system’s B cells and turn them into antibody-secreting factories? In addition, could this be an alternative way to produce laboratory antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic applications?

The answers were yes. Cell-culture experiments with the technique produced antibodies against key antigens from the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 and the bacterium that causes pneumonic plague.

The initial observation and subsequent discovery show how researchers affiliated with the Nanovaccine Institute based at Iowa State University look at their research from many perspectives:

“This is a great example of the healthy tug of war between a basic research finding about the mechanism of antibody production and a translational benefit that we may have invented a new antibody-production platform,” said Balaji Narasimhan, the director of the Nanovaccine Institute, an Iowa State Anson Marston Distinguished Professor in Engineering and the Vlasta Klima Balloun Faculty Chair. “The Nanovaccine Institute is burning both sides of that candle.”

The journal Science Advances recently published the researchers’ findings. First author is Sujata Senapati, a former Iowa State doctoral student in chemical and biological engineering. Corresponding authors are Narasimhan and Surya Mallapragada, an Iowa State Anson Marston Distinguished Professor in Engineering, an associate vice president for research and the Carol Vohs Johnson Chair in Chemical and Biological Engineering. (See sidebar for the full research team.)

Grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a part of the National Institutes of Health, supported the researchers’ work.

It’s like a ladder

It was clear to the researchers that these nanomaterials – “pentablock copolymer micelles,” according to the researchers’ paper – helped B cells initiate antibody production. (Micelles are structures that self-assemble in water or oils as their molecules align because of their water-loving or water-hating properties.)

“From our studies, we understood very early on that these self-assembling micelles are different from the other types of adjuvants out there,” Senapati said. “What we didn’t know was the reason behind this unique type of immune response generated by them and that to me was the most intriguing part of this project.”

Mallapragada said the researchers were able to tailor the chemistry of the nanomaterials, creating “micelles with added functionality.”

One of those functions is the ability of positively charged micelles to associate with multiple antigens and directly interact with receptors on B cells, according to the paper. This cross-linking of the B cell receptors led to better antibody production and an enhanced immune response to a vaccine.

“These micelles act like a scaffold to cross-link two receptors,” said Michael Wannemuehler, an associate director of the Nanovaccine Institute and an Iowa State professor of veterinary microbiology and preventive medicine.

He said the cross-link is strong and stable, like a ladder hooked at both ends, and is effective at stimulating antibody production by the B cells.

That cellular activation came without the inflammatory response that accompanies other vaccine adjuvants, potentially producing a “‘just right’ immune response” that could be “critical in the rational design of vaccines for older adults” who often suffer from chronic inflammation, according to the paper.

Making lab antibodies

Now that the researchers understood the “behind-the-scenes” mechanism of the micelles’ antibody boost, Senapati said they wanted to see what else they could find.

“The next obvious step then was to test our hypothesis with antigens from some real-world pathogens and see if these micelles could be potentially used to produce antibodies against them,” she said.

They used the micelle scaffolds to present antigens for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes pneumonic plague, to B cells in culture.

Those cells began generating “laboratory-scale quantities of therapeutic antibodies” against the two antigens, “further expanding the value of these nanomaterials to rapidly develop countermeasures against infectious diseases,” according to the paper.

Those antibodies could potentially be used for diagnostic test kits or for treatments such as the monoclonal antibodies that have been developed to treat COVID-19, Wannemuehler said.

“There are different ways to produce antibodies,” Narasimhan said. “The method we found is an alternative that could be quite powerful if it’s generalized to other diseases. It could be a plug-and-play platform.”

Because it’s an effective vaccine adjuvant and antibody producer, the paper says the nanomaterial platform developed by the study team is “a highly versatile tool in the development of multiple countermeasures against emerging and reemerging infectious diseases.”

– 30 –

The research team

In addition to Balaji Narasimhan, Sujata Senapati, Surya Mallapragada and Michael Wannemuehler, the research team includes Ross Darling, a former Iowa State doctoral student in veterinary microbiology and preventive medicine; and Kathleen Ross, the core facility manager for the Nanovaccine Institute.

Read the paper

“Self-assembling synthetic nanoadjuvant scaffolds cross-link B cell receptors and represent new platform technology for therapeutic antibody production,” Science Advances, Aug. 4, 2021; Volume 7, Issue 32

 


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Addressing the HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Working in partnership will be key, says Alex Kalomparis, vice president, public affairs, international at Gilead Sciences. 2021
The post Addressing the HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia appeared first on .

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Working in partnership will be key, says Alex Kalomparis, vice president, public affairs, international at Gilead Sciences.

2021 marks 40 years since the first cases of HIV were reported. In that time, over 79 million people have been diagnosed with HIV, with more than 36 million dying from AIDS-related illnesses, more than any other infectious disease.

While there has been incredible progress in the HIV response, nearly 38 million people are living with HIV, with more than a million new cases every year, jeopardising the goal to end AIDS as a public health threat by 2030.

HIV places enormous burdens on the communities it affects most, straining health systems and government budgets. In the era of the global COVID-19 pandemic, where health systems are already stretched to breaking, it is tempting to cut costs in other areas, including HIV. If commitment to the HIV response wanes, the progress we have made is at risk, leading to increases in new infections in regions that can least afford to tackle them.

“An epidemic somewhere is an epidemic everywhere”

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen the temptation to focus on one’s own backyard, isolate oneself from the rest of the world, and believe one is safe and protected. We know now that this protection is an illusion. Regardless of the protections we erect in our own countries, allowing public health crises to persist in other parts of the world threatens our own progress and safety.

The message is clear: an epidemic somewhere is an epidemic everywhere. To find our way out of a pandemic, we must broaden our ideas of how to respond, and address the problems and inequities that allow diseases to thrive in other parts of the world. To be effective, our response must be global.

The same is true for HIV. HIV has persisted for 40 years, and is still here because root problems continue to drive the epidemic: stigma and discrimination, poverty, lack of access to services and treatments, lack of access to education, and the marginalisation of the people and communities most at risk of HIV. These are not issues that can be addressed by any one government, group, or company. They can be addressed only in partnership with one another, and by engaging those key marginalised communities in our effort to end the HIV epidemic.

Whilst the global community has the tools it needs to meaningfully address new HIV infections, HIV is on the rise in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). Unlike other regions in the world, rates of HIV in EECA have increased, with infections up by 72 per cent, and AIDS-related deaths up by 24 per cent since 2010.

Working with the Elton John AIDS Foundation

However, across EECA, a range of community partners are making significant contributions in the fight against HIV, such as the first wave of the RADIAN ‘Unmet Need’ fund and Model City grantees, previously announced in 2020. In the first nine months of the programme, these partners have already reached more than 12,000 people from vulnerable communities directly with services, initiating life-saving care in over 2,000 people living with HIV.

RADIAN, a ground-breaking partnership between Gilead Sciences and the Elton John AIDS Foundation, works with local experts to target new HIV infections and deaths from AIDS-related illnesses in EECA in the communities most vulnerable to HIV.

Focusing on the groups most affected by HIV in EECA (eg men who have sex with men, transgender people, sex workers, and people who use drugs), RADIAN engages with groups led by these communities and are sensitive to the difficulties unique to the region.

“We all have one common goal: ending HIV”

Anne Aslett, CEO of the Elton John AIDS Foundation, is clear that for the partnership to reach its goals, it’s crucial to listen to and amplify the voices of people for whom HIV is a tangible, daily reality.

“They understand better than anyone the challenges associated with the virus, and what works to stop it. No matter where we are in the world, we must partner with them, and follow their leadership. We are proud of our RADIAN partnership with Gilead, to champion the vital work of communities to bring an end to the AIDS epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.”

Companies like Gilead Sciences provide industry leading expertise, while Governments bring an understanding of health systems and funding, developing an infrastructure that enables access.

However, these efforts need community leadership because they know best how to ensure people can access those systems to get tested, and adhere to medication. They understand the fears and sensitivities, the strengths and stigma within those communities, the nuances that make the difference in linking their members to the care they need. No two regions of the world experience the ‘same’ HIV epidemic. People living with HIV are critical to the success of any HIV response.

This autumn, RADIAN will launch a campaign telling the inspirational stories of ordinary, yet remarkable, community members who are taking action to turn the tide of the HIV epidemic in EECA.

We all have one common goal: ending HIV. It is crucial that we all understand the role we can play to achieve this. Our access to global networks of public health expertise, government funding, and innovative HIV treatments are meaningless unless they are used in service of people living with, and at risk of, HIV. They are the core of any successful response, regardless of country or region. Working in partnership with them is the key to ending HIV. By respecting them as leaders and giving them the seat at the head of the table, we make our work more effective and responsive to local needs, bringing us closer to the end of the HIV epidemic globally.

About the author 

Alex Kalomparis is vice president, public affairs, international at Gilead Sciences. He joined the company in January 2017 and is responsible for all communications and patient advocacy activities across Africa, Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. Prior to that Alex held senior communication roles with a number of consumer and pharmaceutical companies, including Unilever, Rolls Royce, Novartis, Roche, AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline.

The post Addressing the HIV epidemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia appeared first on .

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