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COVID Falls From G7 Agenda – Focus Now On Russia, Russia, Russia

COVID Falls From G7 Agenda – Focus Now On Russia, Russia, Russia

Remember at the beginning of this year when you could not turn on the TV…

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COVID Falls From G7 Agenda - Focus Now On Russia, Russia, Russia

Remember at the beginning of this year when you could not turn on the TV or log on to the web without being bombarded by a non-stop wave of covid fear mongering? 

Remember when you couldn't even ask questions about the validity of the claims made by Anthony Fauci, the CDC and others without getting booted from social media? 

Remember the insanity and the zealotry of the devout covid cult sitting in their cars with masks on, walking around outside with their masks on, and then getting right in people's faces when they didn't have a mask on?

The covid pandemic event was a near perfect combination of induced fear in the minds of cowards, along with induced authoritarianism in the minds of people who, deep down, desperately want to control everyone else around them.

Where did all the hype go?  It disappeared in a matter of weeks once the corporate media gave up on the narrative.  There were a few reasons for this...

First, the Infection Fatality Rate of covid was far too small to warrant all the doom mongering.  With an average IFR of only 0.27% (recently adjusted to 0.23%), the vast majority of people have nothing to worry about from the virus.  Second, the lie of the “pandemic of the unvaccinated was exposed.  In fact, states and countries that actually tracked “breakthrough infections” showed that the vaccinated were far more likely to get infected than people who were not vaccinated and had natural immunity.  Third, the vaccine passport efforts failed in the US at the federal level and in red states, and thus, the rest of the world saw that half the country could function perfectly fine without medical tyranny.

Once there is a working example that defies the medical tyranny model, other countries are going to demand answers for why they have to remain in lockdown while some people can be free?  Only a few nations with the most extreme authoritarianism (like China) continue to enforce lockdowns and vax controls.  

All the excuses for lockdowns and forced vaccinations fell apart in the US, and any further push for vax passports was inspiring millions of Americans to potentially take up arms.  So, the establishment walked away from the plan.  It was as simple as that.

This abandonment of the precious covid program has been made evident in the latest G7 summit, which does not seem to have covid listed as a topic of discussion, and the pandemic has so far been completely overshadowed by other concerns.  World leaders have clearly moved on and are not even wearing masks for show anymore (If the vaccines actually work, what do you need a mask for?  If they don't work, then why take one?).  Instead, the subject of Russia and the war in Ukraine is dominating G7.  Secondary topics include climate change and “gender equality.”

The notion of covid as a nothing-burger issue seems to fall in line with shifts in public focus.  Inflation is currently on the top of the list of biggest problems facing the US (and most other countries), followed by violent crime.  Covid rates at the very bottom of the list in polling.  

The G7 summit will surely touch on inflation and other economic issues, but they appear intent on doing so only as a way to blame Russia for our economic decline.  To reiterate a fact that Joe Biden and many other world leader refuse to admit to:  The inflation crisis started WAY before Russia invaded Ukraine.  While sanctions against Russia will definitely expound on supply chain problems, the bigger issue is central bank fiat printing and too many dollars chasing too few goods.  

The Ukraine situation is also fading as a subject of widespread outrage among Americans.  Europe is more immediately affected because of their dependency on Russian oil and natural gas, but questions are rising about why we should be so focused on Ukraine when there are much bigger problems closer to home.  Overall, establishment politicians continue to ignore the one issue that the majority of the world wants answers and solutions for, which is economic decline.  But, in order to offer answers, they would first have to acknowledge the true gravity of the threat, and they're not going to do that until it's far too late to do anything about it. 

Tyler Durden Tue, 06/28/2022 - 08:47

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International

Apple Reportedly Shifting Watch And MacBook Production To Vietnam

Apple Reportedly Shifting Watch And MacBook Production To Vietnam

Wary of soaring tensions surrounding out-of-favor countries like China,…

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Apple Reportedly Shifting Watch And MacBook Production To Vietnam

Wary of soaring tensions surrounding out-of-favor countries like China, multinational corporations such as Apple are diversifying production to places with less geopolitical risk.

Nikkei Asia spoke to three sources with direct knowledge of Apple's plans to shift Watch and MacBook production out of China to Vietnam for the first time. 

Apple suppliers Luxshare Precision Industry and Foxconn have already piloted a production run of the Watch in northern Vietnam. 

The move by Apple is a further win for the Southeast Asian country as it already produces iPads and AirPods. 

Two sources told Nikkei Asia that Apple had requested suppliers to set up a MacBook test production line in Vietnam. They said progress in constructing laptop production in the country has been "slow, partly due to pandemic-related disruptions but also because notebook computer production involves a larger supply chain."  

"AirPods, Apple Watch, HomePod and more ... Apple has big plans in Vietnam, apart from iPhone manufacturing," one of the people with direct knowledge of Apple's plans said. "The components for MacBooks have become more modularized than in the past, which makes it easier to produce the laptops outside of China. But how to make it cost-competitive is another challenge."

This trend is called "friendshoring." While it's a play on "offshoring," this isn't about companies moving operations back to the US and Europe, but rather seeking foreign alternatives that retain the benefit of low labor costs but with less international controversy. 

Apple's production diversification comes as the US and China already had an increasingly adversarial relationship before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan sparked anger with Beijing. The fact is, geopolitical and trade war tensions aren't going away anytime soon and will only push Apple further away from China. Though reshoring production to the US is unfeasible because of labor costs, maybe robotics can offset some of those costs or perhaps set up shop in Mexico, where there's abundant cheap labor and healthy demographics. 

A recent Rabobank analysis of friendshoring showed that chief beneficiaries would include countries like Vietnam, India, Brazil, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Mexico, Turkey, Egypt, and South Africa.

Apple's Tim Cook appears to have learned a valuable lesson this year that high exposure of supply chains to China during Beijing's zero-Covid policies and worsening geopolitical tensions with the West is a dangerous cocktail, and the need to diversify production in a trend dubbed friendshoring is essential for survival in a multi-polar world. 

Tyler Durden Wed, 08/17/2022 - 18:30

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International

Apple Reportedly Shifting Apple Watch And MacBook Production To Vietnam

Apple Reportedly Shifting Apple Watch And MacBook Production To Vietnam

Wary of soaring tensions surrounding out-of-favor countries like China,…

Published

on

Apple Reportedly Shifting Apple Watch And MacBook Production To Vietnam

Wary of soaring tensions surrounding out-of-favor countries like China, multinational corporations such as Apple are diversifying production to places with less geopolitical risk.

Nikkei Asia spoke to three sources with direct knowledge of Apple's plans to shift Watch and MacBook production out of China to Vietnam for the first time. 

Apple suppliers Luxshare Precision Industry and Foxconn have already piloted a production run of the Watch in northern Vietnam. 

The move by Apple is a further win for the Southeast Asian country as it already produces iPads and AirPods. 

Two sources told Nikkei Asia that Apple had requested suppliers to set up a MacBook test production line in Vietnam. They said progress in constructing laptop production in the country has been "slow, partly due to pandemic-related disruptions but also because notebook computer production involves a larger supply chain."  

"AirPods, Apple Watch, HomePod and more ... Apple has big plans in Vietnam, apart from iPhone manufacturing," one of the people with direct knowledge of Apple's plans said. "The components for MacBooks have become more modularized than in the past, which makes it easier to produce the laptops outside of China. But how to make it cost-competitive is another challenge."

This trend is called "friendshoring." While it's a play on "offshoring," this isn't about companies moving operations back to the US and Europe, but rather seeking foreign alternatives that retain the benefit of low labor costs but with less international controversy. 

Apple's production diversification comes as the US and China already had an increasingly adversarial relationship before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan sparked anger with Beijing. The fact is, geopolitical and trade war tensions aren't going away anytime soon and will only push Apple further away from China. Though reshoring production to the US is unfeasible because of labor costs, maybe robotics can offset some of those costs or perhaps set up shop in Mexico, where there's abundant cheap labor and healthy demographics. 

A recent Rabobank analysis of friendshoring showed that chief beneficiaries would include countries like Vietnam, India, Brazil, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Mexico, Turkey, Egypt, and South Africa.

Apple's Tim Cook appears to have learned a valuable lesson this year that high exposure of supply chains to China during Beijing's zero-Covid policies and worsening geopolitical tensions with the West is a dangerous cocktail, and the need to diversify production in a trend dubbed friendshoring is essential for survival in a multi-polar world. 

Tyler Durden Wed, 08/17/2022 - 18:30

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Economics

Reduced myocardial blood flow is new clue in how COVID-19 is impacting the heart

Patients with prior COVID may be twice as likely to have unhealthy endothelial cells that line the inside of the heart and blood vessels, according to…

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Patients with prior COVID may be twice as likely to have unhealthy endothelial cells that line the inside of the heart and blood vessels, according to newly published research from Houston Methodist. This finding offers a new clue in understanding covid-19’s impact on cardiovascular health.

Credit: Houston Methodist

Patients with prior COVID may be twice as likely to have unhealthy endothelial cells that line the inside of the heart and blood vessels, according to newly published research from Houston Methodist. This finding offers a new clue in understanding covid-19’s impact on cardiovascular health.

In a new study published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, Houston Methodist researchers examined the coronary microvasculature health of 393 patients with prior covid-19 infection who had lingering symptoms. This is the first published study linking reduced blood flow in the body and COVID-19.

Using a widely available imaging tool, called positron emission tomography (PET), researchers found a 20% decrease in the ability of coronary arteries to dilate, a condition known as microvascular dysfunction. They also found that patients with prior COVID-19 infection were more likely to have reduced myocardial flow reserve – and changes in the resting and stress blood flow – which is a marker for poor prognosis and is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular events.

“We were surprised with the consistency of reduced blood flow in post covid patients within the study,” said corresponding author Mouaz Al-Mallah, M.D., director of cardiovascular PET at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, and president elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology. “The findings bring new questions, but also help guide us toward further studying blood flow in COVID-19 patients with persistent symptoms.”

Dysfunction and inflammation of endothelial cells is a well-known sign of acute Covid-19 infection, but little is known about the long-term effects on the heart and vascular system. Earlier in the pandemic, research indicated that COVID-19 could commonly cause myocarditis but that now appears to be a rare effect of this viral infection.

A recent study from the Netherlands found that 1 in 8 people had lingering symptoms post-covid. As clinicians continue to see patients with symptoms like shortness of breath, palpations and fatigue after their recovery, the cause of long covid is mostly unknown.

Further studies are needed to document the magnitude of microvascular dysfunction and to identify strategies for appropriate early diagnosis and management. For instance, reduced myocardial flow reserve can be used to determine a patient’s risk when presenting with symptoms of coronary artery disease over and above the established risk factors, which can become quite relevant in dealing with long Covid.

Next steps will require clinical studies to discover what is likely to happen in the future to patients whose microvascular health has been affected by COVID-19, particularly those patients who continue to have lingering symptoms, or long COVID.

This work was supported, in part, by grants from the National Institutes of Health under contract numbers R01 HL133254, R01 HL148338 and R01 HL157790.

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For more information: Coronary microvascular health in patients with prior COVID-19 infection. JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. (online Aug. 16, 2022) Ahmed Ibrahim Ahmed, Jean Michel Saad, Yushui Han, Fares Alahdab, Maan Malahfji, Faisal Nabi, John J Mahmarian, John P. Cook, William A Zoghbi and Mouaz H Al-Mallah. DOI: www.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcmg.2022.07.006

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