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Bank of America Study Finds 84% of Employers Now Say Offering Financial Wellness Tools Helps Increase Employee Retention

Bank of America Study Finds 84% of Employers Now Say Offering Financial Wellness Tools Helps Increase Employee Retention
PR Newswire
CHARLOTTE, N.C., Sept. 27, 2022

97% of employers feel responsible for employee financial wellness, with 91% seeing …

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Bank of America Study Finds 84% of Employers Now Say Offering Financial Wellness Tools Helps Increase Employee Retention

PR Newswire

97% of employers feel responsible for employee financial wellness, with 91% seeing higher employee satisfaction when offering resources to manage overall wellbeing

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Sept. 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ --  Bank of America today announced findings from its 12th annual Workplace Benefits Report, "Navigating a New Era of Financial Wellness." The report revealed that 84% of employers now say that offering financial wellness tools can help reduce employee attrition, and 81% say wellness tools help attract higher quality employees. This is critical to employers, as 46% have seen an increase in resignations over the past year. In addition, approximately one in three employees have switched jobs or thought about switching jobs in the past year.

The report also explored the impact of the current economic and inflationary environment on employees' financial wellness, revealing that 62% of employees are stressed about their finances. In addition, 80% of employees are concerned about inflation, and 71% feel the cost of living is outpacing growth in their salary or wages. This is having an impact on employees overall feeling of financial wellness. After the percentage of employees who feel financially well bounced above pre-pandemic levels in February 2022 (57% vs. 55% in 2019), the percentage dropped to a 5-year low of 44% in July 2022.

"Offering comprehensive benefits and wellness programs can be critical for employers looking to reduce attrition, can empower employees to take control of their personal finances, and improve employee satisfaction," said Lorna Sabbia, Head of Retirement and Personal Wealth Solutions at Bank of America. "We are committed to partnering with employers to provide financial wellness solutions through a holistic and integrated approach that's actionable for every employee."

Based on a nationwide survey of 824 employees and 846 employers conducted in February, and a second survey of 478 employees conducted in July, the Workplace Benefits Report examines trends related to workplace financial benefits and wellness programs.

Employers are embracing financial wellness programs and expanding support

In response to increased stress about financial wellness, employers continue to embrace programs to expand support for their employees. For example, 91% of employers see higher employee satisfaction when they offer resources to manage overall wellbeing. Other top employer findings include:

  • Employers feel an increased sense of responsibility for the financial wellness of employees. 97% of employers feel responsible for employee financial wellness (up from 95% in 2021, and from 41% in 2013) – with two-thirds (62%) going as far to say they feel extremely responsible (up from 56% in 2021). Employees agree with this sentiment, as 82% say employers should play a role in supporting their financial wellness.
  • Wellness programs result in tangible benefits for employers and employees. 80% of employers agree that offering financial wellness support can result in more satisfied, loyal, engaged and productive employees. Employers who take it a step further and broaden their wellness programs to include mental and physical wellness resources are seeing noticeable improvements in productivity (50%), employee stress (43%), employee morale (41%) and employee creativity and innovation (36%).
  • Equity grants are powerful recruitment and retention incentives. 76% of employers believe equity compensation is a differentiator for employee recruitment and retention, and 44% of employees who participate in equity compensation plans say it was an important reason for accepting the job.
  • Health care remains an opportunity. 84% of employers feel very responsible for their employees' understanding of retirement healthcare needs and costs, and 89% of employers who offer Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) contribute to their employees' savings. Healthcare education is an opportunity, with only 54% of employers communicating about these topics at least once a year.
  • Access to investment advice. With four-in-ten employees saying they want access to advice from an investment professional, 62% of employers are now offering employees access to investment advice services (up from 55% in 2021).
  • Heightened focus on D&I programs. 74% of employers believe that diversity and inclusion programs are important for retaining talent, and half (50%) of employers currently offer diversity and inclusion programs.

Employees seeking programs to help alleviate financial strain and plan for the future

Employees express uncertainty about current economic conditions and are taking actions to relieve financial strain:

  • Employees are dipping into savings due to financial strain. Half of employees have taken action in the last six months due to financial strain, including tapping into emergency savings (21%), working additional hours (21%), looking for higher paying jobs (20%) and taking out a 401(k) hardship withdrawal (6%).
  • Retirement remains a top concern, driving action. As of July 2022, 56% of employees are confident they will reach their retirement goals, down from 69% in February 2022. Seventy-four percent say investing in their 401(k) and other accounts will help them build a retirement nest egg, and 61% are contributing enough to maximize their employer match.
  • Education about Social Security is an opportunity. Only 38% of employees say they understand social security benefits. Even among Baby Boomers, 41% still do not understand social security. While 48% of employees indicate they are not getting enough education about the program, only 40% of employers offer employees social security support and education.
  • Employees are more optimistic about their intermediate, longer term future. When looking at the next 2-3 years, most employees said they felt optimistic about their financial (56%), social (60%), and mental (62%) well-being.
  • Digital tools play a key role in driving employee engagement. Employees are seeking out digital tools that offer personalized support, and employees find tools that can provide streamlined information and help track and set financial goals most useful. Fifty-two percent of employees prefer to use a digital app to manage their finances.

Financial wellness levels vary based on employees' ethnicity, gender and generation

Employees continue to show differences in financial wellness when viewed by gender, ethnicity or generation. Though the financial wellness gap has closed for women, it has expanded for minorities since February. Top findings include:

  • Women lag men but are closing the gap when planning for long-term goals. Women continue to trail men in their feelings about financial wellness and preparedness. For example, 54% of men and 69% of women do not understand social security benefits. Despite this, the financial wellness gender gap is closing. As of July 2022, women were less likely to feel financially well than men by five percentage points (42% of women vs. 47% of men), down from 10 percentage points in 2021 (47% of women vs. 57% of men) and 17 percentage points in 2020 (41% of women vs. 58% of men).
  • Minorities have seen a greater negative impact to their feelings of financial wellness. Employees across various ethnicities reported significant drops in their perceptions of financial wellness, with minorities reporting more significant declines. For example, 49% of White/Caucasian employees feel financially well (compared with 56% in February), followed by 37% of Asian employees (67% in February), 33% of Hispanic/Latino employees (47% in February) and 32% of Black/African American employees (50% in February).
  • Feelings of financial wellness have declined across generations this year. Since February, feelings of financial wellness have declined significantly across generations, with Gen Z/Millennials at -15%, Gen Xers at -14% and Baby Boomers/Silent Generation at -10%.

Bank of America's Retirement & Personal Wealth Solutions organization serves more than 26,000 companies of all sizes and more than 5.9 million employees as of December 31, 20211. Bank of America offers institutional client employees a range of financial benefit programs and solutions to help them pursue their financial future.

More findings, including action steps for employers, are available in the Bank of America 2022 Workplace Benefits Report.

Workplace Benefits Report Methodology

Escalent surveyed a national sample of 834 employees who are working full-time and participate in 401(k) plans, and 846 employers who offer both a 401(k) plan and have sole or shared responsibility for decisions made in the plan. The survey was conducted between February 3, 2022 and February 28, 2022. To qualify for the survey, employees had to be current participants of a 401(k) plan and employers had to offer a 401(k) plan option. Neither was required to work with Bank of America. Bank of America was not identified as the sponsor of the study. Bank of America Retirement & Personal Wealth Solutions help employers and employees to take action and work toward their financial goals today and into retirement.

July 2022 Pulse Study Methodology

Escalent surveyed a national sample of 478 employees who are working full-time and participate in 401(k) plans. The survey was conducted between July 5, 2022 and July 19, 2022. To qualify for the survey, employees had to be current participants of a 401(k) plan. They weren't required to work with Bank of America. Bank of America was not identified as the sponsor of the study. Bank of America Retirement and Personal Wealth Solutions help employers and employees to take action and work toward their financial goals today and into retirement.

Financial Wellness at Bank of America

At Bank of America, we know that supporting the physical, financial and emotional wellbeing of our employees in their personal life also supports them in their work life — so they can be the best at work and at home. When it comes to financial wellness, we believe that the more informed people are about their money, the clearer their financial outlook can be. This applies not just to our clients, but to our employees, as well. This is why we offer robust financial offerings to our employees that focus on driving better behaviors across life priorities and the financial spectrum — budgeting, planning, saving, investing and more. Our competitive financial benefits – including 401(k) plans that include a company match, retirement advice2, health savings accounts3, banking4 and investing5 programs, educational resources and financial wellness tools – help employees address money issues in the here-and-now, prepare for retirement and help protect their family over the long term.

1Source: Global Wealth and Investment Management Finance. 
2Investment advice on 401(k) assets is only provided to plan participants through certain investment advisory programs as directed by plan sponsors. 
3Made available through Bank of America, N.A. 
4Bank products are available from Bank of America, N.A., and affiliated banks. 
5Investment products are available from Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated.

Bank of America

Bank of America is one of the world's leading financial institutions, serving individual consumers, small and middle-market businesses and large corporations with a full range of banking, investing, asset management and other financial and risk management products and services. The company provides unmatched convenience in the United States, serving approximately 67 million consumer and small business clients with approximately 4,000 retail financial centers, approximately 16,000 ATMs and award-winning digital banking with approximately 55 million verified digital users. Bank of America is a global leader in wealth management, corporate and investment banking and trading across a broad range of asset classes, serving corporations, governments, institutions and individuals around the world. Bank of America offers industry-leading support to approximately 3 million small business households through a suite of innovative, easy-to-use online products and services. The company serves clients through operations across the United States, its territories and approximately 35 countries. Bank of America Corporation stock (NYSE: BAC) is listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

For more Bank of America news, including dividend announcements and other important information, visit the Bank of America newsroom and register for news email alerts.

www.bankofamerica.com

Retirement and Personal Wealth Solutions is the institutional retirement business of Bank of America Corporation ("BofA Corp.") operating under the name "Bank of America." Investment advisory and brokerage services are provided by wholly owned non-bank affiliates of BofA Corp., including Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (also referred to as "MLPF&S" or "Merrill"), a dually registered broker-dealer and investment adviser and Member SIPC. Banking activities may be performed by wholly owned banking affiliates of BofA Corp., including Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC.

Investment products:

Are Not FDIC Insured       Are Not Bank Guaranteed       May Lose Value

© 2022 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. MAP#4942964

Reporters may contact:
Don Vecchiarello, Bank of America
Phone: 1.980.387.4899
don.vecchiarello@bofa.com

 

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Global Wages Take A Hit As Inflation Eats Into Paychecks

Global Wages Take A Hit As Inflation Eats Into Paychecks

The global inflation crisis paired with lackluster economic growth and an outlook…

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Global Wages Take A Hit As Inflation Eats Into Paychecks

The global inflation crisis paired with lackluster economic growth and an outlook clouded by uncertainties have led to a decline in real wages around the world, a new report published by the International Labour Organization (ILO) has found.

As Statista's Felix Richter reports, according to the 2022-23 Global Wage Report, global real monthly wages fell 0.9 percent this year on average, marking the first decline in real earnings at a global scale in the 21st century.

You will find more infographics at Statista

The multiple global crises we are facing have led to a decline in real wages.

"It has placed tens of millions of workers in a dire situation as they face increasing uncertainties,” ILO Director-General Gilbert F. Houngbo said in a statement, adding that “income inequality and poverty will rise if the purchasing power of the lowest paid is not maintained.”

While inflation rose faster in high-income countries, leading to above-average real wage declines in North America (minus 3.2 percent) and the European Union (minus 2.4 percent), the ILO finds that low-income earners are disproportionately affected by rising inflation. As lower-wage earners spend a larger share of their disposable income on essential goods and services, which generally see greater price increases than non-essential items, those who can least afford it suffer the biggest cost-of-living impact of rising prices.

“We must place particular attention to workers at the middle and lower end of the pay scale,” Rosalia Vazquez-Alvarez, one of the report’s authors said.

“Fighting against the deterioration of real wages can help maintain economic growth, which in turn can help to recover the employment levels observed before the pandemic. This can be an effective way to lessen the probability or depth of recessions in all countries and regions,” she said.

Tyler Durden Mon, 12/05/2022 - 20:00

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Metaverse comes in second place as Oxford’s word of the year

The term describing an internet-enabled virtual world lost to "goblin mode" in 2022 — "a type of behavior which is unapologetically self-indulgent, lazy,…

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The term describing an internet-enabled virtual world lost to "goblin mode" in 2022 — "a type of behavior which is unapologetically self-indulgent, lazy, slovenly, or greedy."

“Metaverse” has come in second to “goblin mode” as the Oxford University Press’ 2022 word of the year after the process was opened up to voters for the first time ever.

In a Dec. 4 announcement, Oxford Languages said the viral term “goblin mode” beat out “metaverse” and #IStandWith to become its 2022 word of the year. According to Oxford’s research, usage of the term metaverse “increased almost fourfold from the previous year in the Oxford Corpus,” driven in part by Facebook’s rebranding to Meta in October 2021.

Metaverse lost to goblin mode, which went viral in February, as it seemingly “captured the prevailing mood of individuals who rejected the idea of returning to ‘normal life’” following COVID-19 lockdowns being lifted in many areas. #IStandWith took third place in the contest, driven by social media hashtags including #IStandWithUkraine following Russia’s invasion of the country in February.

“As we grapple with relatively new concepts like hybrid working in the virtual reality space, metaverse is particularly pertinent to debates about the ethics and feasibility of an entirely online future," said Oxford Languages. "A worthy opponent to ‘goblin mode’, ‘metaverse’ gained voting traction with crypto communities and publications. We see the term continue to grow in use as more voices join the debate about the sustainability and viability of its future."

In the video pitch for ‘metaverse’ released in November, Oxford said the term dated back to “the science fiction novel Snow Crash by Neil Stephenson,” released in 1992.

More than 300,000 people cast votes between the three terms shortlisted by Oxford Languages.

Related: The metaverse is happening without Meta's permission

“NFT,” or nonfungible token, won Collins Dictionary’s contest for the word of 2021, while “vax” took first place as Oxford’s chosen word that the same year. The latest results seemingly represent a change in social media fervor around the crypto-related terms, which was reportedly falling in the first quarter of 2022.

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United Airlines stock has a 50% upside from here: Morgan Stanley

United Airlines Holdings Inc (NASDAQ: UAL) is keeping in the green on Monday in an otherwise down market after a Morgan Stanley analyst said 2023 could…

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United Airlines Holdings Inc (NASDAQ: UAL) is keeping in the green on Monday in an otherwise down market after a Morgan Stanley analyst said 2023 could be a “goldilocks” year for the air carrier.

United Airlines stock has upside to $67

Ravi Shanker sees upside in the airline holding company to $67 that translates to a near 50% premium on its current stock price.

He upgraded United Airlines stock to “overweight” this morning because he’s convinced that international travel will recover swiftly in 2023.

Earnings recovery post pandemic has kept pace with, if not led, peers and messaging has been very confident. We expect more normalised, just right conditions in 2023, stabilizing at level more favourable to earnings that market is pricing in.

Shanker expects continued leisure demand next year while business travel, he wrote, could exceed levels last seen before the COVID pandemic.

UAL has outperformed peers year-to-date

According to the Morgan Stanley analyst, prices will ease in 2023 as capacity returns. CASMxF trajectory was among other reasons cited for the bullish call.

United Airlines stock is roughly flat for the year at writing versus other major airline stocks in the red. Still, Shanker continues to see its current valuation as attractive. His note reads:

United Airlines Holdings Inc seems on track to exceed its 2023 guidance and to hit its 2026 guide issued eighteen months ago – something even the biggest UAL bulls may have considered difficult at the time.

In October, the Chicago-headquartered air carrier reported its financial results for the third quarter that handily topped Street estimates.

The post United Airlines stock has a 50% upside from here: Morgan Stanley appeared first on Invezz.

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