Swiss Utility In LNG Supply Talks With Canada's Goldboro Project

Aug 16 14:08 2018 Print This Article

Axpo, a Swiss utility and energy trader, said on Aug. 16 it was in talks with a Canadian company planning to build a LNG terminal on the country's East Coast for a 10-year supply deal.

If the talks lead to a Sales and Purchase Agreement (SPA), they would help boost the chances of the $7.6 billion Goldboro project being built by Pieridae Energy to become the first LNG export terminal on Canada's East Coast.

Canada is rich in oil and gas but has yet to export LNG to Asia from its West Coast or across the Atlantic from its East Coast in commercial quantities despite major companies planning 20 export terminals.

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