“Living” bandages made from biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers

May 15 14:05 2018 Print This Article

A February 16, 2018 news item on Nanowerk announces research from a Russian team about their work on “living” bandages,

In regenerative medicine, and particularly in burn therapy, the effective regeneration of damaged skin tissue and the prevention of scarring are usually the main goals. Scars form when skin is badly damaged, whether through a cut, burn, or a skin problem such as acne or fungal infection.

Scar tissue mainly consists of irreversible collagen and significantly differs from the tissue it replaces, having reduced functional properties. For example, scars on skin are more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation, are not elastic, and the sweat glands and hair follicles are not restored in the area.

The solution of this medical problem was proposed by the researchers from the NUST MISIS [National University of Science and Technology {formerly Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys State Technological University})] Inorganic Nanomaterials Laboratory, led by PhD Anton Manakhov, a senior researcher. The team of nanotechnology scientists has managed to create multi-layer ‘bandages’ made of biodegradable fibers and multifunctional bioactive nanofilms, which [the bandages] prevent scarring and accelerate tissue regeneration.

Read More

About Article Author

Frogheart

FrogHeart provides commentary about nanotech, science policy and communication, society, and the arts. Run by Maryse de la Giroday, a science communications consultant and writer, FrogHeart is one of the largest independent scince blogs in Canada. Since the websites launch in 1994, Giroday's list of clients includes Océ NV, Telgate Systems, Nortel Networks, Redback Systems, Forintek, Gretag AG, Inetco Systems, and Creo Products (which later became part of Kodak). She has also taught in SFU’s Writing and Communications Program. Giroday earned a Bachelor's degree in Communications from Simon Fraser University in 1992 and a Masters in Creative Writing and New Media from De Montford University in Leicester, UK.

  Categories:

Related Items

Removing more than 99% of crude oil from ‘produced’ water (well water)

Should you have an oil well nearby (see The Urban Oil Fields of Los Angeles in an August 28, 2014 photo essay by Alan Taylor for The Atlantic for examples of oil wells in various municipalities and cities associated with LS) , this news from Texas may interest you. From an August 15, 2018 news item ...

Fracking Wastewater Spikes 1,440% in Half Decade, Adding to Dry Regions’ Water Woes

Read time: 7 mins Between 2011 and 2016, fracked oil and gas wells in the U.S. pumped out record-breaking amounts of wastewater, which is laced with toxic and radioactive materials, a new Duke University study concludes. The amount of wastewater from fracking rose 1,440 percent during that perio ...

Killing bacteria on contact with dragonfly-inspired nanocoating

Scientists in Singapore were inspired by dragonflies and cicadas according to a March 28, 2018 news item on Nanowerk (Note: A link has been removed), Studies have shown that the wings of dragonflies and cicadas prevent bacterial growth due to their natural structure. The surfaces of their wings ar ...

All Aboard BCI's Gravy Train?

Norm Farrell of In-Sights reports, The Gravy Train Accelerates:BC Investment Management Corporation (BCI), the public pension fund manager in this province increased compensation costs by 30% per dollar of funds managed in fiscal year 2017-2018. It already paid extravagant salaries before this late ...

Dalhousie University’s (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada) 200th anniversary with Axel Becke whose discoveries apply to nanotechnology and pharmaceuticals

To celebrate its 200th, Dalhousie University has developed the Dalhousie Originals 200th anniversary storytelling project featuring a number of prominent intellectuals and scientists associated with the university. Axel Becke, whose work has had an impact on nanotechnology and more, is one of them ...

One-Sided Story: Lobbyist Data Shows Music, Movie and Publisher Groups Account For 80 Per cent of Registered Copyright Meetings in Canada Since 2015 Election

Canadian Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez travelled to Toronto last week, providing an opportunity for the newly-named minister to meet with cultural groups. With many of the biggest rights holder groups tweeting out the meet and greet (CMPA, Writers Guild, Access Copyright, ACTRA, ACP), the visit ...

New Method for Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Could Reduce Costs

Long-term groundwater monitoring can be a complex, and potentially costly, practice requiring frequent sampling and laboratory analysis. A new method developed by scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and Savannah River National Laboratory a ...

Actuaries Climate Index Shows Growth in Climate Extremes

The latest Actuaries Climate Index data, reported by organizations representing the actuarial profession in Canada and the United States, showed that the five-year moving average of climate extremes across the two countries reached a new, record high in autumn 2017. “Increased precipitation and c ...

What do we teach while the world is burning?

Lizanne Foster I usually spend August thinking about what I'll do when I'm back at school again in September but lately all I can think about is 48 C rain. I keep wondering about what lessons would prepare my teen students for a world where hot water falls from the sky, where oceans are too warm ...

See Nobel prize winner’s (Kostya Novoselov) collaborative art/science video project on August 17, 2018 (Manchester, UK)

Dr. Konstantin (Kostya) Novoselov, one of the two scientists at the University of Manchester (UK) who were awarded Nobel prizes for their work with graphene, has embarked on an artistic career of sorts. From an August 8, 2018 news item on Nanowwerk, … Nobel prize-winning physicist Sir Kostya Nov ...