‘Lilliputian’ skyscraper: white graphene for hydrogen storage

Jul 12 17:07 2018 Print This Article

This story comes from Rice University (Texas, US). From a March 12, 2018 news item on Nanowerk,

Rice University engineers have zeroed in on the optimal architecture for storing hydrogen in “white graphene” nanomaterials — a design like a Lilliputian skyscraper with “floors” of boron nitride sitting one atop another and held precisely 5.2 angstroms apart by boron nitride pillars.

Caption Thousands of hours of calculations on Rice University’s two fastest supercomputers found that the optimal architecture for packing hydrogen into “white graphene” involves making skyscraper-like frameworks of vertical columns and one-dimensional floors that are about 5.2 angstroms apart. In this illustration, hydrogen molecules (white) sit between sheet-like floors of graphene (gray) that are supported by boron-nitride pillars (pink and blue). Researchers found that identical structures made wholly of boron-nitride had unprecedented capacity for storing readily available hydrogen. Credit Lei Tao/Rice University

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About Article Author

Frogheart

FrogHeart provides commentary about nanotech, science policy and communication, society, and the arts. Run by Maryse de la Giroday, a science communications consultant and writer, FrogHeart is one of the largest independent scince blogs in Canada. Since the websites launch in 1994, Giroday's list of clients includes Océ NV, Telgate Systems, Nortel Networks, Redback Systems, Forintek, Gretag AG, Inetco Systems, and Creo Products (which later became part of Kodak). She has also taught in SFU’s Writing and Communications Program. Giroday earned a Bachelor's degree in Communications from Simon Fraser University in 1992 and a Masters in Creative Writing and New Media from De Montford University in Leicester, UK.

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