How do nanoparticles interact with the environment and with humans over time?

May 14 15:05 2019 Print This Article

I meant to get this piece published sooner but good intentions don’t get you far.

At Northwestern University, scientists have researched the impact engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) might have as they enter the food chain. An October 18, 2019 Northwestern University news release (also on EurekAlert) by Megan Fellman describes research on an investigation of ENPs and their interaction with living organisms,

Personal electronic devices — smartphones, computers, TVs, tablets, screens of all kinds — are a significant and growing source of the world’s electronic waste. Many of these products use nanomaterials, but little is known about how these modern materials and their tiny particles interact with the environment and living things.

Now a research team of Northwestern University chemists and colleagues from the national Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology has discovered that when certain coated nanoparticles interact with living organisms it results in new properties that cause the nanoparticles to become sticky. Fragmented lipid coronas form on the particles, causing them to stick together and grow into long kelp-like strands. Nanoparticles with 5-nanometer diameters form long structures that are microns in size in solution. The impact on cells is not known.

Read More

About Article Author

Frogheart

FrogHeart provides commentary about nanotech, science policy and communication, society, and the arts. Run by Maryse de la Giroday, a science communications consultant and writer, FrogHeart is one of the largest independent scince blogs in Canada. Since the websites launch in 1994, Giroday's list of clients includes Océ NV, Telgate Systems, Nortel Networks, Redback Systems, Forintek, Gretag AG, Inetco Systems, and Creo Products (which later became part of Kodak). She has also taught in SFU’s Writing and Communications Program. Giroday earned a Bachelor's degree in Communications from Simon Fraser University in 1992 and a Masters in Creative Writing and New Media from De Montford University in Leicester, UK.

  Categories:

Related Items

Innovation Guelph receives $1.9 million federal investment for women entrepreneurship

Innovation Guelph, which supports local entrepreneurs through funding and programming, has received $1,879,983 from the federal government. The government’s investment is part of its $2 billion Women’s Entrepreneurship Strategy, which aims to double the number of women-owned businesses by 2025 ...

Declining Calcium Levels in Freshwater Lakes Have Negative Impacts on Some Species

A new global study evaluated how calcium concentrations are changing in freshwater lakes around the world. The study revealed that in widespread areas in Europe and eastern North America, calcium levels are declining towards levels that can be critically low for the reproduction and survival of ma ...

A nanocomposite biomaterial heart valve from the University of British Columbia (Canada)

I wish the folks at the University of British Columbia (UBC) would include more technical/scientific information in their news releases about research. For those who do like a little more technical information, I included the paper’s abstract at the end of this post. A March 25, 2019 news item on ...

Ankle exoskeletons good for people who need to do a lot of walking or running on the job

For people who need a little extra ankle support, this might be useful in the, hopefully, not too distant future. The new ankle exoskeleton design integrates into the shoe and under clothing. Submitted photo. Courtesy of Vanderbilt University Credit: Matthew Yandell A March 22, 2019 news item on Sc ...

S|W: The SaaS Weekly – SaaS vendor lock-in is here

The SaaS Weekly is a weekly newsletter covering major SaaS news from Canada and around the globe. Subscribe to S|W using the form at the bottom of this page to ensure you don’t miss out on the most important SaaS news every week! Focus FS to have global reach following partnership with Germany- ...

The Law Bytes Podcast, Season One in Review: The Copyright Episodes

Copyright law and policy was an important part of season one of the Law Bytes podcast with several episodes devoted to Canadian reforms as well as international developments. The Canadian copyright review figured prominently: Episode 4 featured clips from my appearance before the Standing Committee ...

Yes, It's Due to Human Activity: New Research 'Should Finally Stop Climate Change Deniers'

Read time: 4 mins By Tim Radford for Climate News Network European and US scientists have cleared up a point that has been nagging away at climate science for decades: not only is the planet warming faster than at any time in the last 2,000 years, but this unique climate change really does have ...

UCP slaps Alberta Teachers Association … probably not for the last time

David J. Climenhaga Almost completely missed in media coverage of Friday's purge of NDP appointees to agencies, boards and commissions by Alberta's United Conservative Party government was the revelation that the same day the government abruptly cancelled a three-year-old memorandum of agreement ...

An art/science and a science event in Vancouver (Canada)

We’re closing off August 2019 with a couple of talks, Curiosity Collider features an art/science event and Café Scientifique features a discussion about protease research. Collider Café: Art. Science. Hybrids. on August 21, 2019 From an August 14, 2019 Curiosity Collider announcement (received ...

A solution to the problem of measuring nanoparticles

As you might expect from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) this research concerns techniques for measurements. From an August 15, 2019 news item on Nanowerk (Note: Links have been removed), Tiny nanoparticles play a gargantuan role in modern life, even if most consumers ...