RESP

What’s the best TFSA investing strategy for a young professional?

Q. I’m a 28-year-old speech-language pathologist making around $5,000 per month after tax. I have been aggressively saving for the past two years and was able to fully pay off my $32,000 student loan debt during that time as well. I currently have $10,000 in my TFSA and I am not sure what to do w ...

When you should take a break from investing

Q. For the last three years, I have been investing with a Couch Potato portfolio using ETFs. I’m about to get married and hopefully start a family. Would the Couch Potato still be a good strategy during what I know will be high-expense years, with a mortgage, children and so on in the near future ...

An easy guide to income splitting for seniors

Q. My husband and I are both retired. He still has income from his business, and I have cashed in all of my RRSPs but one. My question is: Can Hubby cash one of his RRSPs (and pay taxes, of course), but then turn around and buy a spousal RRSP for me? Would that be worth doing? Then I could cash thi ...

ETFs that limit losses in an investment portfolio: are they for real?

Q. We would like to find a product that will offer good, solid downside protection. I purchased the Invesco S&P 500 Downside Hedged ETF (PHDG), but I’m not sure if just leaving it in our portfolio is a good idea. We have a small account and never use stop losses, so we need a good product. — Re ...

What to do when financial advisors doesn’t live up to their promises

Q. My husband and I had a combined investment portfolio of about $750,000. We agreed to a 0.75% fee to our advisor, which amounted to $5,600 last year. Despite that cost, our portfolio is now worth $732,120. This advisor claimed that 4% was his expected gain for us, and he has fallen far short. Any ...

What to do when financial advisors don’t live up to their promises

Q. My husband and I had a combined investment portfolio of about $750,000. We agreed to a 0.75% fee to our advisor, which amounted to $5,600 last year. Despite that cost, our portfolio is now worth $732,120. This advisor claimed that 4% was his expected gain for us, and he has fallen far short. Any ...

Can I have a multi-generational RESP?

Q: I have an existing RESP for my children, but they may not use all the money. Can I add grandchildren (once born) to the same RESP and keep this going in terms of growth and returns? — Frank A:  A Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP) is a great way to save for a child or grandchild’s pos ...

Using asset allocation ETFs for your RESP

One-fund ETF portfolios can be ideal for education savings [MoneySense] ...

How to use ETFs in your child’s RESP

Q. Several years ago, an advisor recommended I hold a Canadian dividend ETF in an RESP for my son. Would this still be a good approach for someone just starting an RESP for their baby, or is there a better alternative, given the increasing number of ETF options? – Pete in Halifax A. In many ways, ...

Millennial homebuyers and seniors among the winners of Budget 2019

The Liberals’ last budget of this mandate sets the stage for the October federal election and includes a sprinkling of money for voters across a wide spectrum. But there are also gaps in spending for some groups. Here’s what the budget does and doesn’t do, for five key voting groups: Veterans ...